Technical Skills – Tuesday 9th October 2012

On Tuesday 9th October 2012, we had a variety of workshops and lectures that included an introduction to film development and darkroom practices. For me, this was one of the best days so far as I was completely new to both types of processes; it was like Christmas all over again!

Below are the notes that I took in both of the workshops.

Film Development:

The process of film development:

  • Developing the film – This is the only part of the process that can vary
  • Stop developing
  • Fix film
  • Wash film
  • Dry film

 

What happens if my photographs are under-exposed?

  • Over-develop them

 

What happens if my photographs are over-exposed?

  • Under-develop them

 

How to develop 120mm roll film:

  1. Go into the camera (darkroom) with the roll of film and the 120mm box that is needed for the machine
  2. MAKE SURE THE DOOR IS LOCKED
  3. Put the 120mm box on the side
  4. Start to unravel the film
  5. Hold onto the film and detach the film from the projective paper
  6. Drop the paper to the floor – keep a hold of that film!
  7. Roll the film up into a cigarette size, keeping the shiny side of the film on the outside
  8. Put the film into the 120mm box, leaving a finger-width of film on the outside
  9. Take out of the darkroom, making sure that the box lid is secured
  10. Stick the exposed part of the film onto the plastic using the blue tape
  11. Check the development times for your type of film and make sure that the machine is set up correctly
  12. MAKE SURE THE BAR FOR THE 120MM IS IN PLACE
  13. Put the plastic through the machine, until the box slots into the section, and close the door
  14. To check the film position, press number 5 on the keypad

 

How to develop 35mm roll film:

  1. Use the small machine on the desk to catch the end of the film
  2. Pull the end of the film out slightly and cut off the curved corner
  3. Stick the exposed part of the film onto the plastic using the blue tape
  4. Check the development times for your type of film and make sure that the machine is set up correctly
  5. Put the plastic through the machine, until it slots into the box and close the door
  6. MAKE SURE THE BAR FOR THE 120MM HAS BEEN REMOVED
  7. To check the film position, press number 5 on the keypad

 

The Dark Room:

Specific parts of the Enlargers:

  • Lens – Specific lens for 35mm film or 120mm film
  • Negative Carrier – This is found between the lens and the bulb and is the part of the enlarge that holds the negatives in place
  • Focusing Knob – This moves the lens closer and further away from the negative to focus it
  • Head Knob – This moves the head of the enlarger up and down to give a larger or smaller image
  • Aperture Ring – This is found on the lens and changes the aperture so that the light from the enlarger becomes dimmer and brighter
  • Easel – This is where the photo paper is placed for the enlarger to transfer an image
  • Magnifier – This is used to determine whether the projection of the image is in focus, before exposing it onto photo paper
  • Timer – This controls the exposure time of the enlarger

 

The Timer:

  • Time Dial – This is numbered 1 to 9 and is used to determine the number of seconds of the exposure time
  • Focus Button – This turns the enlarger on and enables us to view the projection and see if it is in focus
  • Run/Stop Button – This is the button that is used to expose the negative for the period of time set on the timer

 

Ilford Multigrade Print Developer:

  • Dilute 1 part developer to 9 parts water

 

Print Processing Times:

Ilford Multigrade Resin Coated

  1. Developer (1 to 9) – 1 minute
  2. Stop Bath (Water) – 30 seconds
  3. Fixer (1 to 9) – 2 minutes
  4. Wash (Running Water) – 2 minutes

 

Ilford Multigrade Fibre Based

  1. Developer (1 to 9) – 2 minutes
  2. Stop Bath (Water) – 30 seconds
  3. Fixer (1 to 9) – 2 minutes
  4. Wash (Running Water) – 1 hour

 

Two Types of Drying Machines:

  • Resin Coated Photo Print Dryer
  • Arkay Model 150 Fibre Based Print Dryer

 

Below are the four items that I exposed during this particular darkroom workshop; they all had an aperture of f/8

 

Darkroom Test – Exposure set for three seconds and exposed four times; going from left to right, the exposure times are 3 seconds, 6 seconds, 9 seconds, and 12 seconds.

 

Cathedral Test – Three second exposure

 

Final Cathedral Print – Three second exposure

Final Cathedral Bridge Print – Three Second Exposure

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