Alive: Rankin Faces Death and an Introduction into Referencing

On Monday 21st October 2013, I attended a day of uni which included the following: the first was a session in which we watched “A Culture Show Special – Alive: Rankin Faces Death” and the second was a small workshop where we were introduced to referencing for our essay brief.  After both of these, we were then given a practise task to complete by Thursday followed by another group research presentation. Below are the notes from all of these sittings:

“A CULTURE SHOW SPECIAL – ALIVE: RANKIN FACES DEATH“:

  • Want to photograph real people with real problems” – Rankin

Subjects:

  • Lesley
    • 42
    • 2 teenage sons
    • Breast cancer
    • Diagnosed 4 years ago (from when film was made)
    • Lives in Bolton
    • Friends say she’s “More glamorous now than she used to be
    • It’s not until she takes the wig off that you actually start to learn who she is” – Rankin
    • To me, once you’ve died it’s all about your soul, not your body. You can do what you want with my body” – Lesley
  • Sandra
    • 48
    • Husband
    • 16 year old boy
    • Suffolk
    • 2007 cancer spread everywhere
    • Developed a brain tumor on her cerebellum
    • Wants a disguise, don’t want people worrying about her or their pity
    • I’m still here, kicking and fighting, and at the end of our lives, we all go to the same place. It’s just a matter of time” – Sandra

sandra-by-rankin

 

  • John
    • There is a serious side to it, but you can’t let that get to you” – John
    • He is Rankin’s perfect subject
  • Jim
    • 68
    • End stage emphysema
    • Colchester
    • The saddest bit in my life at the minute, I just don’t see people anymore” – Jim
    • You don’t ever accept that you die, you can’t take it in” – Jim
    • You’re a clever bugger aren’t you?” – Jim said to Rankin
  • Wilko Johnson
    • Given 9 months to live
    • Attitude to that prognosis that caught the attention of the media
    • Realize that attitude may be unusual or something
    • Wife died of cancer nearly 4 years ago
    • Do believe we have a soul but it’s not immortal” – Wilko
    • If I thought I would have seen Irene, I would have killed myself 9 years ago” – Wilko
  • Lily Ebert
    • Born in 1930
    • Hungarian
    • So you’ve looked death in the eye” – Rankin, Lily replies with “More than once
    •  Auschwitz Concentration camp
      • Life was difficult
      • You try to help somebody, be kind to somebody, you get punished for it
    • Now, life must be so amazing” – Rankin, Lily replies with “It is
    • I got given a second chance” – Lily
    • Are you scared of death, now?”  – Rankin, Lily replies with “No. I am not afraid. No.
    • Surrounds herself with photographs – none of the people in them would have lived if she hadn’t survived
  • Louise Page
    • 42
    • Husband
    • When you love someone, you want to take away hurt, you don’t want to give hurt” – Louise
    • He needs to know that it’s okay to let me go” – Louise about husband
    • She’s very close to her emotions” – Ranking shooting her

louise-by-rankin

 

  • People should spend about 15 minutes a day thinking about death to get used to the idea – it’s a part of life
  • It’s the most ordinary thing in the world
  • Death is inevitable
  • Sure I’m going to get criticized by it, but I kind of don’t care” – Rankin
  • Rankin
    • Don’t normally bring himself into projects, but this one is different
    • Skull has always been the symbol of death – lost its original meaning through fashion

rankin-3567405

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO REFERENCING:

Module deadlines:

  • Essay on turnitin
    • No blog-booking
  • Groups – googledocs into PDF and excel spreadsheet of reflection
    • Put on CD
  • Practice – everything that is relevant for your site-specific, nothing else
    • Put on same CD as group PDF

Introduction to Referencing:

  • Why do we reference?
    • Demonstrates the integrity of the writing
    • Acknowledges work of other people
    • Gives read opportunity for you to trace through idea
    • Demonstrates you understand what you are writing about
    • Identify argument
    • Contextualize argument
  • Do’s and don’ts
    • Only reference what is useful
    • Quote or paraphrase – make sure it’s referenced
  • Reference style:
    • Depends on the publication you are writing for
    • Writing for CU so will use their referencing style
    • CU supports Reference works
    • Free web based software you can store references called Zotero
  • What do you need?
    • Authors full name
    • Title of the book or book chapter in the book
    • Date of publication
    • Publisher and location
    • Page number of any quotes
  • What happens when it’s an editor and not an author?
    • Look at author of chapter
    • Name, date, chapter, in _________ then same reference as usual
    • Find referencing guide on Moodle – CAW – long guide – page 17
    • If the book is edited, the name will go under the actual author, in alphabetical order
  • Abstracts
    • Can help you figure out whether you want to read the article or not
    • Can access from your computer using Locate

Questions to discuss about reading:

  • What’s the text about?
    • Different perspectives and the way people view the photograph
    • National Geographic example
  • How do you understand gaze?
    • Alters the viewers understanding of the image
    • Changes depending on our background
    • Interpreted in different ways
    • Something very subjective
    • Has a lot of different purposes
  • How many gazes are the authors discussing?
    • 7
    • Photographers gaze
    • Magazines gaze
    • Readers gaze
    • Non-western subjects gaze
    • Westerns gaze
    • Reflective gaze
    • Academic gaze
  • Which other authors are discussed whilst this author is discussing the gaze?
    • Laura Mulvey – Male gaze
    • John Berger – Male gaze
    • Gains
    • Tagg
    • Foucalt
    • Homi Bhabha
    • Susan Sontag
    • Geary
    • Lacan
    • Devereux
    • Metz
    • Barthes
    • Collins
    • Radway
    • Levine
    • Marcus and Cusham
    • Goffman
    • Maquet
    • Alvarado
    • Alloula, Burgin
    • Wolfe
    • May
    • Haraway
    • Adas
    • McCrane
    • Graham-Brown
    • Jameson

PRACTICE TASK:

  • Portrait workshop
  • Put on googledocs
  • Research Guardian and Harper Collins
    • Written information (about publications, types of images they like using) – Holly
    • Photos they usually use – Steve
    • Lighting Diagrams of photos that have been found – Matt
    • Possible image ideas – Lucy

Google Hangouts:

  • Gmail account – can create a profile
  • Similar to facebook – social media platform, interact with others, join subnetworks within platform called circles
  • Profile
    • Similar to facebook
    • Can include contact details if wanted
  • Circles
    • Add people into circle
    • Share information
    • Look at their profiles – if private, you will not be able to add
  • Links
    • Put links to other websites and pages
  • Suggestions
    • Who to follow
    • Much like twitter
    • General name seach
    • Small part of google+
  • Chat function
    • Similar to facebook – individuals or group
  • Video chat
    • Can have up to 10 people
    • Screenshare – biggest research tool in google hangouts
      • Collaboration
      • Shows what is on every persons screen
  • Converstaions can be live streamed
    • Allow other viewers to watch but not be on the video chat
    • Reach a wider audience
    • Can save a podcast for later publication
  • Hashtags and trends
    • Can expand contacts by using search for hashtags
    • Events
    • Photos
    • Status
  • Is it a good research tool?
    • Struggle to get used to it
    • Can be valuable when used correctly – sharing apps
    • Can discover areas of interest
    • Would be more beneficial just going straight to the primary research
    • Confusing?
    • Wouldn’t be your first choice
    • Too much hard work
    • If the company advertised it more it may be useful
    • Is an aid and assistant for your research
    • Collaboration is it’s best feature
Advertisements