Site-Specific Brief (Personal Practice)

As I have stated in a previous post:

(http://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.
com/2013/09/30/second-year-introduction/
),

on Monday 30th September 2013, I started my second year of photography at Coventry University. During this day, I was given access to our three main assignments that we need to complete in order to pass this module. This post is dedicated to the Site-Specific brief (personal practice), which accounts for 40% of this module.

As with all of my previous projects, the first step that I have taken in completing the task is highlighting and annotating the brief. The main points that I found have been written below:

“40%”

“… Make a piece of work…”

“… Integrates your personal interests with an assigned site in Coventry.”

“… Download a map…”

“… Encouraged to research your site fully before you start taking photographs.”

“… Local social and cultural history, myths and/or the landscaped geography…”

“… Lens based…”

“… Needs to be original to you.”

“… Explore your own photographic direction and investigate an area of photography which interests you.”

“The presentation of your project should be appropriate to its development.”

“… November 25th…” 

“… Formally present your final assignment on this date.”

“Failure to present your work will affect your final grade.”

“… Evidence your ongoing research on your blog and write a summative 300 word reflective statement about your assignment.”

After defining which parts of the brief were the most important in order for me to successfully complete this task, I then thought that the next, best step to take would be to mind-map my personal photography interests which I will be able to explore in further detail using this brief. Below, I have bullet pointed my main interests that I think could be used to answer the given brief:

  • Landscape photography
  • Urban/architecture photography
  • Macro photography
  • Street photography

After listing my main interests, I then thought that the next step I should take was to have a look at the 15 maps we were given as resources in order to see if any of them could be used as a way of conveying my chosen styles. Each of these maps were given to us in a road map layout, making it difficult to interpret the landscape within the given area. That is why I decided to use the satellite settings on Google Maps to enable me to increase my understanding of the given areas. Having done this for all of the 15 maps, I then went through a phase of elimination where I decided which areas I thought would be the best locations for me to use. I managed to narrow the 15 down to a mere four areas, all of which can be found in both a road map and a rough satellite map, below:

Map 2:

Map 2 Image

Map 2 Satellite

Map 6:

Map 6 Image

Map 6 Satellite

Map 13:

Map 13 Image

Map 13 Satellite

Map 15:

Map 15 Image

Map 15 Satelitte

After narrowing the large list of maps down to only four locations that I was interested in, the next step that I took was pairing up which location I thought best suited my photography interest. This list can be found below:

  • Map 2 – Urban/architecture, street, possible macro?
  • Map 6 – Urban/architecture, street, possible macro?
  • Map 13 – Urban/architecture, street, macro
  • Map 15 – Urban/architecture, street

Once realizing that I could pretty much create a project of any form of my specialist photography within these four areas, I decided that the best thing to do would be to come up with some more specific ideas based on my general knowledge that I had of the areas and the geographical landscapes portrayed through the Google Map images. These ideas can be found below, along with the numbered map where I think they could take place:

  • General urban photo shoot emphasizing the run down areas of Coventry – Maps 2, 6, 13, and 15
  • Architectural photo shoot showing the contrast between the historic/rundown and modern buildings found around Coventry – Maps 2, 6, 13, and 15
  • Documentary photo shoot photographing student houses/accommodation accompanied by portraits of individuals that live there; one artifact of two images – Mainly Map 15

After much consideration, I decided that I would like to explore my second idea (the architectural photo shoot showing a contrast between the historic/rundown and modern buildings found around Coventry) for this modules site-specific project. This is because, when looking at my three original ideas, I feel that this particular plan would enable me to explore research with a greater depth whilst also allowing me to experiment with a wider range of architectural subjects.

Once I had decided upon my final idea that I wished to take forward, the next, obvious step was to pinpoint which of the maps I was going to use. After re-visiting both the road and satellite maps of each area (and using my individual knowledge of the regions), I concluded that the area in which I am going to conduct my photo shoot is going to be within the site of Map 6.

Map 6 Satellite

Following my decision, I then thought that the best consequent step would be to take my idea to lecturer Caroline Molloy in order to see if it was an acceptable plan. Within this short meeting, along with agreeing to the idea, she managed to give me a range of questions that she wanted me to answer when researching the area. These can be found below:

1)    When were they built?

2)    Why were they built like that?

3)    Who funds them?

4)    Why have they been maintained/introduced?

After receiving these research questions, I then thought that the best step would be to use Google Maps as primary resource tool, which will enable me to narrow down some of the buildings I wish to explore within my research and photo shoot. Below I have placed screenshots of particular buildings that I thought would be of interest:

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My next planned step is to, therefore, conduct research about these individual buildings within the area of Map 6, which will enable me to answer the above research questions and hopefully add depth to my photo shoot.

Below I have listed some of the research that I conducted about the individual buildings and the relevant information that I actually found followed by where I sourced the information:

RESEARCH FOUND:

7 Little Park Street – Coventry, CV1 2UR

  • Was built around the 1720s-30s for a silk merchant
  • Similar window decorations to that of Stoneleigh Abbey (designed by the Smith brothers, William and Francis, in 1720-1726)
  • Listed building – 5th February 1955

7 Little Park Street

60 Whitefriars Street – Coventry, CV1 2DS

  • The “Coliseum” Café and Dance Hall
  • The Gaumont Palace was built incorporating the failed “Coliseum” Cafe and Dance hall next door (1920-22) which hit financial difficulties after trying to extend and build a theatre
  • The unfinished project was acquired and demolished by Bristol Provincial Cinematograph Theatres Ltd in 1928 who’s architect W H Watkins designed what is now know as the Ellen Terry Building (please see below)
  • It was extended towards Jordan Well in 1931 to form the Gaumont Palace
  • The top floor by the dome had an open garden which had a lawn, flower boarder & a pond with gold fish
  • It was the home to the Coventry Bridge Society
  • Three letters on the plaque above the door “FTH” – Francis H Turner, builder
  • Ballroom was completely destroyed in the Easter raid of 1941 and was never rebuilt

60 Whitefriars Street

Benedictine Court – Priory Place, Coventry, CV1 5SE

  • Many areas built by 2003
  • Additional builds are currently taking place
  • Residents
  • Waterwindow
    • Designed by Susanna Heron
    • 1998-2003
  • Youell House
    • Built by current city architect – unknown
    • Ruins were uncovered
    • Digs started in 1999 and were supervised by Margarat Rylatt and George Demidowicz
  • Millennium Causeway
    • Looks down to millennium place – where Whittle Arch is located
    • May be named this because in 1043 Leofric and Godiva founded a Benedictine monastery for twenty four monks

Benedictine Court

Britannia Hotel – Fairfax St, Coventry, CV1 5RP

  • Was the De Vere hotel – designed in sympathy with Coventry Cathedral

Britannia Hotel - Fairfax Street

Browns – Earl St, Coventry, CV1 5RU

  • 1998 the site of the unfinished pre-war museum was taken over by the pub/restaurant
  • One of Coventry’s most successful 1990s buildings

Browns - Earl Street

Coventry Cathedral/St Michael’s – Priory St, Coventry, CV1 5FB

  • The majority of the great ruined churches and cathedrals of England are the outcome of the violence of the dissolution in 1539
  • St. Michael’s church finally became a cathedral in 1918 when the diocese of Coventry was created under Bishop Yeatman-Biggs
  • On 14th November 1940, the city of Coventry was devastated by bombs dropped by the Luftwaffe
  • The cathedral burned with the city, having being hit by several incendiary devices
  • Decision to rebuild the cathedral was taken the morning after the destruction
  • First post-war building to be listed
  • The new Cathedral was designed by Sir Basil Spence
  • Built between 1951-1962
  • Consecrated in 1962
  • Combines the old cathedral spire and ruined nave with the new building which is situated beside it
  • Glass screen etched by John Hutton

Coventry Cathedral - Priory Street

Coventry Cathedral - Priory Street 2

Coventry City Council – Council House, Earl St, Coventry, CV1 5RR

  • Edward Garrett and H.W. Simister designed the new Council House in Tudor style
  • Building began in 1913 but its completion was delayed by the First World War
  • Foundation stone was laid on 12th June 1913
  • Building was finished in 1917
  • Was not officially opened until 11thJune 1920
  • Prominent features of the exterior such as the corner clock tower, the statues of Godiva, Leofric and ‘Justice’ above the entrance, and smaller figures elsewhere on the building were not added until 1925-26
  • The clock
    • Was damaged during an air raid in 1941
    • Is wholly mechanical, with no electrical parts at all

Coventry City Council - Earl Street

Coventry Crown Court – Much Park Street

  • No information can be found
  • Photography is prohibited – I will therefore not be taking photographs of this particular building

Coventry Crown Court - Much Park Street

Earl of Mercia – 18 High St, Town Centre, Coventry, CV1 5RE

  • Originally the London and Midland Bank, Limited
  • Erected in 1869
  • Elizabethan style
  • The current pub, Earl of Mercia, was opened on 27th July 2000
  • This Wetherspoon pub takes its name from Leofric, Earl of Mercia,

Earl of Mercia - High Street

Hay Lane – Coventry, CV1 5RF

  • Home to one of the oldest pubs in Coventry – The Golden Cross
  • The Golden Cross – 8 Hay Lane, Coventry, CV1 5RF
    • One of the longest alcohol-serving venues in England
    • Dates back to 1583
    • In 1661 it was reported as one of 137 inn’s/alehouses in Coventry
    • During the 1900s it underwent extensive restoration and reconstruction
    • In February 1955 it was became a listed building
    • Extension in 1968 doubled the venues size

Hay Lane

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum Jordan Well, Coventry, CV1 5QP

  • Sir Alfred Herbert
    • Set up a company in Coventry in 1888 to make components and tools for Coventry’s cycle industry
    • One of the biggest and most successful in the world
    • Knighted in 1917
  • In 1938 Herbert gave £100,000 to the City to build an art gallery – this building was not completed because of the Second World War
  • After the war, Herbert gave a further £100,000 for a new scheme to build a gallery
  • He laid the foundation stone in 1954
  • Built between 1954-1959
  • Opened in 1960
  • Re-opened in 2008 after a two-phase redevelopment

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum - Jordan Well 2

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum - Jordan Well

Holy Trinity Church – 5A Priory Row, Coventry, CV1 5EX

  • 1600 sittings
  • First known reference was in 1113
  • The original Norman church was all but destroyed in a fire in 1257 – The North porch was the only part to survive
  • The rest of the church was entirely rebuilt during the 13th Century
  • Register dates from 1560
  • The spire and part of the tower fell down in 1666 but were quickly rebuilt
  • 1873 reredos (an altarpiece, or a screen or decoration behind the altar in a church) was erected
    • Designed by Sir Gilbert Scott, R.A.
    • In memory of John Bill
      • Born 1830
      • From 1838 Bill was a Holy Trinity feoffee (a trustee who holds a fief, or “fee”, that is to say an estate in land)
      • He was on the city council between 1836-47
      • He was also a Holy Trinity churchwarden in 1838
      • He died at Rome in 1870 aged 71 but was brought home for burial in Coventry cemetery
  • Managed to survive the Blitz more or less intact due to the bravery and persistence of Rev Clitheroe and a couple of others

Holy Trinity Church - Priory Row

Kirby House – 16 Little Park Street, Coventry, CV1 ?

  • Listed building
  • Built 1735
  • The front of the house dates back to around 1735, but the façade may have been taken from an earlier building
  • The name Kirby House comes from Thomas Hulston Kirby who bought it in 1874
  • Was damaged in the war
  • After much delay, it was extensively rebuilt in 1981 and the original façade was fortunately retained
  • Currently owned by the Citizen’s Advice Bureau

Kirby House - Little Park Street

Lady Godiva Clock – 26 Broadgate, Coventry, CV1 1NE

  • Lady Godiva
    • Wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia
    • She is mentioned in the Domesday survey as one of the few Anglo-Saxons and the only woman to remain a major landholder shortly after the conquest (1066-1086)
  • Lady Godiva’s Most Popular Legend
    • Then she rode forth, clothed on with chastity” – Tennyson
    • Sacrifice made in order to free the inhabitants of Coventry from the excessive taxation imposed by Earl Leofric (Earl of Mercia)
    • Leofric would grant her request if she would strip naked and ride through the streets of the town
    • She made a proclamation that everyone in the town should stay indoors and shut their windows
    • Just one person disobeyed her proclamation in one of the most famous instances of voyeurism – Peeping Tom
  • Peeping Tom
    • Bores a hole in his shutters so that he might see Godiva pass, and is struck blind
  • In the end, Leofric keeps his word and abolishes the onerous taxes
  • Many different, alternative legends
  • Lady Godiva Clock
    • In 1942, the market hall (designed in 1870), by then unstable, was dismantled and the clock mechanism was stored and then used in the Godiva clock
    • Erected in 1953
    • There have been protests that these figures are more suitable to a fairground and not in keeping with the dignity of Coventry

Lady Godiva Clock - Broadgate

Lloyds TSB – 30 High Street, Coventry, CV1 5RA

  • Offers a frontage based on a great triumphal arch
  • Built 1677
    • 1835 Establishment: deeds of settlement
    • The bank rapidly expanded, soon taking over local private bank Beck & Prime (est. 1790) – the bank offices were transferred to 30 High Street
    • In 1839 it took over the private bank of Goodall, Gulson & Co. (est. 1810)
    • Takeover – In 1879 an offer of amalgamation with Lloyds was accepted on terms very favourable to the Coventry & Warwickshire shareholders

Lloyds TSB - High Street

NatWest 24 Broadgate, Coventry, CV1 1NE

  • Classic Portico
  • Built in 1929-1930
  • Listed building – 10th June 2010
  • “It is designed by the acknowledged partnership of FCR Palmer, working with WFC Holden and has a high degree of architectural sophistication, combining classical motifs from a number of sources into an accomplished whole”
  • “The building survived war time bombing”

Natwest - Broadgate

Phoenix 122 Gosford St, Coventry CV1 5DL

  • Called “Phoenix” as this is a symbol taken on by the city to suggest that the city raised from the ashes after being bombed
  • 1906 – when the building was completed
  • Formerly the Sir Colin Campbell Pub

Phoenix - Gosford Street

Priory Hall – Fairfax Street, Coventry, CV1 5FD

  • Oldest Coventry university accommodation
  • Built in the style that became known as “Brutalist”
  • Built by city architect Arthur Ling
  • Built in 1966

Prioiry Hall - Fairfax Street

Priory Row – Priory Row, Coventry, CV1 5EX

  • The timber used for these buildings has been accurately tree-ring dated to around 1414-15
  • They were built around 1648 by Rev. Bryan of Holy Trinity
  • In1414, the ground level at that point in front of the priory was many feet lower than the cottages now stand
  • They also contain 17th century cellars, not the typical vaulted ones of medieval times
  • 7, 8, and 9 Priory Row
    • Number 7 – where John Gulson (philanthropist) lived
    • Number 8 – contains warren of cellars that may relate to the cathedrals foundation
    • Number 9 – “The Dean’s House”; badly damaged during Second World War
  • 11 Priory Row
    • Very badly damaged during the blitz of 1940
    • It is now where the Dean of Coventry Cathedral lives
    • Listed building – 5 February 1955

Priory Row

The Ancient Coventry Cross – Cuckoo Lane, Coventry, CV1 5RN

  • Original was erected in 1541 on a site that was occupied by a previous monument dating from 1423 – this monument was demolished in 1510 but there are no records as to why
  • In 1753 and 1755 the top two stages were removed to avoid danger of collapse
  • 1771 demolition was finally authorized
  • Replica was proposed to be built in 1930s – building was withheld due to different circumstances
  • Not until 1960’s when the replica was actually built

The Ancient Coventry Cross

The Ellen Terry Building – Jordan Well, Coventry, CV1 5RW

  • Previously the Gaumont Palace from when it was built in 1931
  • 1931 Classic Art Deco cinema façade
  • Designed by W H Watkins
  • It became the Odeon after refurbishments in 1967
  • Odeon was opened on October 5th 1931 with “The Millionaire”(Warner Bros. 1931) starring George Arliss
  • (The Odeon having relocated to the new “Skydome” in 1999)
  • It is now the Ellen Terry Arts and Media Building of Coventry University
  • Named after famous Victorian actress from Coventry who was born in 1847

The Ellen Terry Building - Jordan Well

The Establishment – Bayley lane, Coventry, CV1 5RN

  • Was originally the County Hall
  • Built between 1783-1784
  • The stone courtroom faces Cuckoo Lane – designed by Samuel Eglington
  • Occupied by the County Hall until 1989
  • Infamous as the place where the last public hanging in Coventry and Warwickshire took place
  • Building lay empty between 1988-2000
  • Listed building

The Establishment - Cuckoo Lane

The Flying Standard – 2-10 Trinity St, Coventry, CV1 1FL

  • In 1424, the council ordered the making of a bullring so that local butchers could bait bulls before slaughter – it is now under Trinity Street
  • The Spotted Dog Pub was open from 1841 until 1930 and demolished in 1934 – moved/changed license approximately 12 times
  • Original buildings of Great Butcher Row were demolished in 1937
  • Current building was built in 1938 by City Architect Donald Gibson
  • The name of this Wetherspoon pub recalls the Standard motor car, part of a range of models made in Coventry, from 1903 until the 1960s – in 1936, the Flying Standard model was made
  • For many years this was the premises of Timothy White’s the Chemist, but in 1999 it opened as a Wetherspoons pub
  • Pub opened on 9th November 1999

The Flying Standard - Trinity Street

The Hub – 4 Jordan Well, Coventry, CV1 5QT

  • Hawkins/Brown were the architects
  • Opened in 2011
  • Student union building
  • The Hub is the greenest building on campus and sets the standard for best practice in sustainable building design, construction and operation
  • Its ‘green credentials’ include: ground source cooling, natural ventilation, solar water heating, grey water harvesting, with rain water used in toilets, and a green roof
  • The Hub has achieved a BREEAM status of Excellent (BREEAM status is widely used to measure a building’s environment performance)
  • The £32m Hub is part of the £150m redevelopment programme at the city centre campus

The Hub - Jordan Well

Whitefriars Old Ale House – 114-115 Gosford Street, Coventry, CV1 5DL

  • One of the earliest timber-framed buildings in Coventry
  • Dated to the fourteenth century
  • Has been recently converted into a pub – 2001
  • (It’s new name, Whitefriars, has no known historical association with the building)

White Friars Old Ale House - Gosford Street

Whittle Arch (on Millennium Place) – 41 Hales St, Coventry, CV11

  • It is named after and commemorates Sir Frank Whittle, the pioneer of the jet engine, who was born in Coventry
  • Signifies vapour trails from jet engines
  • Architect was MacCormac Jamieson Prichard
  • Built in 2003
  • Statue of Sir Frank Whittle stand just below it
  • (MacCormac Jamieson Prichard also designed the glass bridge which is in close proximity to the arch, however, this structure is not included in my chosen map so, unfortunately, I will no be able to photograph it)

Whittle Arch - Hales Street

General Coventry information that may be useful:

  • Famous for it’s three spires – ruined cathedral, Holy Trinity, and Christ Church
  • During the Second World War one in ten of all dwellings were destroyed and the centre of the City was razed to the ground
  • Sir Donald Gibson – designed the new city centre upon the concept of separating vehicular from pedestrian traffic
  • With the help and encouragement of many local organisations the City Council have been anxious to preserve the older buildings, which had miraculously escaped the ravages of war

RESOURCES USED:

7 Little Park Street

60 Whitefriars Street

Benedictine Court

Britannia Hotel – Fairfax Street

Browns – Earl Street

  • A Guide to the Buildings of Coventry: An Illustrated Architectural History by George Demidowicz

Coventry Cathedral – Priory Street

Coventry City Council – Earl Street

Coventry Crown Court – Much Park Street

Earl of Mercia – High Street

Hay Lane

Herbert Art Gallery and Museum – Jordan Well

Holy Trinity Church – Priory Row

Kirby House – Little Park Street

Lady Godiva Clock – Broadgate

Lloyds TSB – High Street

NatWest – Broadgate

Phoenix – Gosford Street

Priory Hall – Fairfax Street

Priory Row

The Ancient Coventry Cross – Cuckoo Lane

The Ellen Terry Building – Jordan Well

The Establishment – Cuckoo Lane

The Flying Standard – Trinity Street

The Hub – Jordan Well

Whitefriars Old Ale House – Gosford Street

Whittle Arch – Hales Street

IDEA:

After completing all of this research, I began to have some ideas as to the details behind what I wanted to shoot. To begin with, I decided that the main aspect that I wanted to show the viewer was the change in architectural design through time. I then came up with two ways of doing this:

My first idea was to create a conceptual response to the architecture showing the main part of the buildings. This would hopefully allow the viewer to easily compare the changes in all of the buildings design and materials through looking for the similarities and differences within my images. This way would also mean that the images created could elicit a more creative style of showing the buildings in an everyday way, (possibly appealing to a wider audience) and portraying similarities between my images and the images shown in the historical books that I read when conducting my research.

My second idea, however, is to experiment with a more creative style of shooting for this particular subject. In this case, I would concentrate on individual features of the exterior and photograph them in a more abstract fashion. This would allow me to highlight key areas that I researched and features that show the change in architectural design in order for some viewers to understand and notice changes in general architectural designs through time. My plan for this idea is also to photograph these individual sections in such a way that the shapes within the images are portrayed similarly in both the historic and modern buildings (by centralizing the key aspects, for example), increasing the comparative nature between the two. Photographing this way will also, hopefully, enhance the viewers understanding of how the structures have changed and/or remained similar through the different architectural movements across the years.

As I have come up with two, very different ideas, I plan on photographing both of these in order to decide which concept I prefer for my final piece. Once the planning and photo shoot have taken place, I will then decide upon my favourite idea and give reasons as to why I have chosen to take that specific one forward.

PLANNING:

What am I trying to capture within my images?

As stated above, for this photo shoot, I plan on photographing similar subjects in two different ways. The first is similar to that of a conceptual shot, where I am aiming to capture the important, architectural part of the building in one frame, allowing the viewer to potentially understand roughly when the building was built, and the condition in which the building has been left.

For my second set of images, I am planning on photographing in a more abstract manner where I will focus on individual features of the exterior of the building. As stated above, I will try to photograph similar shapes on both the historic and modern buildings in order to make them more comparable to the viewer. Doing this, will hopefully mean that I, and the viewer, will be able to see how the shapes and designs of architecture have changed over the years.

After photographing these two styles, I will then decide which one I prefer and what I am going to do with them in order to create my final response to the brief.

What equipment will I need?

  • Canon EOS 600D
  • Tamron SP10-24mm lens – conceptual shot
  • Canon EFS 18-55mm – individual features
  • Light meter – to measure the light in order to find out the best settings in which to have my camera, whilst also giving the photographs the same lighting
  • List of buildings in which I am going to shoot
  • Coat, hat, scarf and gloves! – It’s going to be very cold outside!

What technical aspects will I need to consider?

As stated above, I will be using two types of lenses, which will mean that I will need to be confident in the use of both. I will also need to be careful when changing lenses, as, due to the shoot being outside, I do not want to incur any water damage. I will also be using my light meter in order to receive the correct manual settings for my camera for that particular lighting which should also allow all of my images to have continuity. Finally, for this photo shoot, I plan on using manual focus in order to experiment with the depth of field within my image.

PHOTO SHOOT:

Idea 1 – Conceptual style images

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Idea 2 – Abstract, creative style images

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After narrowing down both sets of my images into my favourites, and editing them, I then had to decide which type I preferred. Looking over them, I felt that they were all successful in showing what I had planned. Though, for me, personally, I feel that my abstract images are slightly stronger than my conceptual style images as I feel that these offer the viewer the opportunity to use their imagination in deciding on what building these specific features can be found. On the other hand, I think that both of these types of final images are effective depending on the context that is given to them. After all, context is king.

However, after much deliberation, and as I feel that both of these types of photographs are successful, I would like to try and incorporate both of them into my final product as I feel that the inclusion of both will widen the pieces context (visually and historically) and allow the viewer to appreciate two different styles of photography within one piece of work.

Did the research affect how you photographed?

For the photographing of the subjects, I feel that the research affected the creation of my abstract images more than those of the conceptual images. This is because throughout my research I found small snippets of information that were targeting individual features of the exterior of the building which meant that when it came to shooting, I would automatically look for these particular areas. The abstract photographs therefore showed a more visual response to some of the research that I found.

WHAT DO I PLAN ON DOING WITH MY IMAGES? – Possible Presentation Ideas

Now I have decided upon taking both types of images forward, I have spent time thinking about how I want to present my images as a final collection. After much consideration, I have decided that I am going to create both a photo book and an e-book. This is because, whilst conducting my research, I found that the majority of historical content was found within physical artifacts or books, whereas the majority of the information for the modern buildings I researched were found online. Creating both of these types of book will therefore anchor the differences in historical and modern that have been portrayed through the images of these buildings.

I have also roughly thought of an idea of how to present the photographs in relation to each other as well as their historical information. With presenting the images, I have thought of a number of ways that this can be done. The first is that I place the images in order of years starting from the oldest, moving up to the newest, like that of a timeline. The second idea is that I will be placing a triptych of the individual features of the building on the left hand page, and the conceptual style shots on the right hand page. (I have chosen a triptych rather than a diptych as the three images will be able to represent the three spires of Coventry). As for the historical information, instead of labeling them as their building name (as these have changed over the years) I have thought about naming them by their address, and date built. (I was originally planning on doing the date and the architect, but there was a bigger gap in my knowledge when it came to these two items). The inclusion of the address will also remind the viewer that this project was created to a site-specific brief, but if there is a gap in this information I will simply say that it is “unknown”.

However, even though I have taken the time to think of these ideas, I cannot say exactly what I am going to do until I start creating the photo books, as I cannot be certain as to how individual images will work together.

PHOTO BOOK RESEARCH:

In my 151MC module last year, one of my assignments was to create either a physical photo book or an e-book on a given theme. (Please find full details of the assignment at https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/assignment-one-photobooke-book/). As you can see from the research that I conducted for this particular brief, I have already analyzed a number of photo books and e-books. That is why, for this assignment, I will bring forward my knowledge from previous research, but will also take the time to look at a couple of photo books, and an e-book, that I enjoy, in order to heighten my understanding about them. Below you can find my analytical notes on the two books and e-book that I decided to look at:

PHYSICAL PHOTO BOOK ONE – Robert Haines Once Upon a Time in Wales

RH

  • Context (according to Dewi Lewis, http://roberthaines.com/my-book/) “…Taken around 1971/2, by 19 year old photographer Robert Haines, they record life in the Welsh valleys, in the village of Heolgerrig and nearby Merthyr Tydfil. Heolgerrig a very close-knit community with Welsh the first language. It was a mining community where most of the men worked underground and life seemed to revolve around the pub and the chapel. Merthyr Tydfil, once the ‘Iron Capital’ of the world, had a justifiable reputation as ‘tough’ with characters such as hard man, Melvin Webber, who died after being blasted by a shotgun, and ‘Mad’ Malcolm for whom no chemical substance was too strong.”
  • Material:
    • Both front and back cover are made from a typical, slightly spongy, hardback material
  • Binder:
    • Typical book binder with ridge – perfect binding
    • Black
    • Name of photographer (white text, capitalized) followed by title of work (red text, capitalized) and smaller font size showing publisher’s name (white text, lower case) – in order to distinguish the important information
  • Size:
    • 225 x 230 mm
  • Front Cover:
    • Black and white photograph taking up whole of the front cover
    • Photographers name and title of work (in same format as on binder) – found at the bottom of the cover, taking up less than 1/6 of the page, overlaying the image
    • Open to blank black card double page
  • First page:
    • Left page
      • Plan black card
    • Right page
      • White, typical photo book paper (plastic and slightly glossy) –the type of paper seen throughout
      • Once Upon a Time in Wales – small text (probably font size 16), found in the centre of the page aligned to the right
  • Title page:
    • Left page
      • Title of work followed by name of photographer
      • “First published in…”
      • Website of publisher
      • “All rights reserved”
      • Copyright
      • ISBN number
      • Design and layout, printed by
      • “With the support of…”
    • Right page
      • Title of work followed by name of photographer – slightly bigger text (probably font size 26), found in the centre of the page aligned to the right
      • Publishers name found bottom right corner
  • Photographs:
    • All black and white
    • Standard image
      • 185 x 122mm (portrait)
      • Aligned to the outer edge side
      • Small body of accompanying text (about person in image) found at top (when on the left page) and bottom (when on right page)
    • Some images
      • 345 x 222 mm (landscape)
      • Filling up one page and bleeding onto the other page
      • Small body of accompanying text found at top (when on the left page) and bottom (when on right page)
    • Pattern
      • 2 x two portrait images on one double page spread, followed by one larger image (taking up right page), followed by 2 x two portrait images on one double page spread, followed by one larger image (taking up left page)
      • Pattern breaks when the story of the individual has finished or when there is an important photo being shown (always shown as the large, landscape format)
  • Last double page:
    • Left page
      • Standard, majority image and text found in the rest of the book
    • Right page
      • Black card
  • Ends with blank black card double page
  • Back cover:
    • Same material as cover
    • Black
    • One of the larger (favourite?) images found at the top of the page, in the centre, surrounded by white border
    • Underneath this lies a brief description about the book written by Dewi Lewis (as stated above in ‘context’ section) followed by a summary of what the images show us (only two sentences)
    • Barcode/Price
  • WHAT I LIKED:
    • Typical texture of the book – nothing fancy, viewer knows straight away that it is a typical photo book
    • Size of the book – maybe slightly bigger for my own book?
    • Cropped photo used on front page – viewer knows straight away that it is a typical photo book
    • Simplistic front pages – suggests that the book is going to be an easy read
    • Inclusion of copyright and other professional elements to be seen on these first pages – also suggests that this book is professionally made
    • No large essay or foreword at beginning – I feel that these can occasionally take away from the images themselves, leaves nothing for the viewers imagination
    • The pattern and symmetrical feel of the book – rhythm shown throughout the book through the formatting of the images
    • Simplicity (photo and little body of text) – gave viewer detail of who/what the subject was but allowed imagination to take hold, giving each viewer an individual experience
    • Photo and context given on back page – gives the viewer a taster of what is inside the book whilst also giving context from another persons perspective
  • WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE:
    • The fact that it didn’t open completely flat – some images were lost in the gutter
    • Creating a pattern from the format of the images then breaking it – felt like it ruined the flow of the work, could it be symbolizing unexpected occurrences that took place within the village? Worked for this book but maybe not for mine if I am to compare subjects

PHYSICAL PHOTO BOOK TWO – Steffen Junghans Kapitulation Fotografien

SJ

  • Context – unsure due to language barriers
  • Material:
    • Both front and back cover are made from a typical, hardback material
  • Binder:
    • Typical book binder with ridge – perfect binding
    • Duck egg blue/grey
    • (Working from bottom to top) Publisher (white, same font as “important” information) followed by name of photographer (white), followed by title of work (white, first word bold, second word normal)
  • Size:
    • 204 x 225 mm
  • Front Cover:
    • Same colour as binder
    • Long, thin photograph, found toward the right, looks similar to that of a strip
    • Photographers name followed by title of work (underneath), found to left of strip image, near bottom of page
    • Publisher found underneath name and title in slightly smaller font, aligned similarly
  • Open to duck egg blue/grey card double page
    • On the left page are the initials of the photographer “S.J.”
  • First page:
    • Left page
      • Blank white page
    • Right page
      • Very small (probably font size 10) photographer name and title of work (same font as on front cover), found near the top to the right of the page
  • Title page:
    • Left page
      • Blank white page
    • Right page
      • Very small (probably font size 10) photographer name, first word in title of work is bold and of a larger font (probably font size 16) found on it’s own line underneath the name, rest of title of work in the same font type and size as photographers name, found in same place as on first page
      • Publishers name/logo found bottom right hand corner
  • Contents page:
    • Sections in book go from new to old pieces of work, also decrease in number of photos per section
    • Left page
      • Museum in which work was shown – Logo found in centre near top
    • Right page
      • Centrally aligned table of contents – page number then title
      • Table of contents title found to the right of the table of contents
  • Foreword:
    • Left page
      • Translation into English – very disjointed as it hasn’t been translated perfectly so some words are given as suggestions in brackets [ ]
    • Right page
      • Foreword in local language
  • Title page for each section:
    • Left page
      • Blank white page
    • Right page
      • Similar lay out to that of front cover but with title to the right of the strip image
  • Pieces of writing (shown before images and describes particular section that the viewer is about to witness):
    • No more than two columns on each page
    • Left page
      • Always rough translation into English
    • Right page
      • Local language
  • Photographs:
    • Very varied
    • Title usually placed at the top of the page closest to the outer edge of the book
    • Page numbers found at bottom of page closest to the gutter
    • Single image to one page – always found in the centre of the page
    • Some images take up the whole page and bleed onto the next in a double page spread
    • Some images just take up one whole page
    • Diptych and triptych are used – show a more detailed part of the bigger picture
    • Some images are shown two to a single page, one under the other
  • Last photographic double page:
    • Left page
      • Typical one photo to a page layout
    • Right page
      • Blank white page
  • Biography – left page
  • Register – right page
  • Last double page
    • Left page
      • Imprint
    • Right page
      • Blank white page
  • Ends with duck egg blue/grey card double page
    • On the right page are the initials of the photographer “S.J.”
  • Back cover:
    • Initials of photographer followed by publishers logo found near the top to the left of the page
  • WHAT I LIKED:
    • Typical texture of the book – nothing fancy, viewer knows straight away that it is a typical photo book
    • Simplistic front pages – suggests that the book is going to be an easy read
    • Simplistic titles of images – didn’t take away from the photo but gave the viewer enough context to understand what the image was about
    • Categories/collections of work introduced in same way – gave slight rhythm to the feel of the book
    • The fact that diptych’s and triptych’s were used – varied the piece of work but still enabled it to remain in context; also show a more detailed part of the bigger picture
  • WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE:
    • The fact that a contents page was used to highlight different collections – personally, I agree with Dick Higgins: “…it doesn’t contain a lot of works, like a book of poems. It is a work.”
    • The large amount of writing – although gave context, felt like it took away from the images slightly
    • Page numbers – again, I feel that this takes away from the image itself
    • The fact that it didn’t open completely flat – some images were lost in the gutter
    • No pattern was created through the formatting of the images – I felt like it was all very random and that there was no flow to the book
    • Language barrier

E-BOOK THREE – Travel Photography from Beyond LA by Pat Blake

e-book

  • http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/460088
  • Context – (according to Pat Blake) “This collection of images are from short trips mostly around southern California – outside of Los Angeles county – and Central California
  • Front Cover:
    • Black and white photograph taking up most of the page – white border surrounding it
    • Title and date found in the top left corner of the photograph in negative space
  • Sliding page transitions
  • First page:
    • Left page
      • Blank white page
    • Right page
      • Title
      • Date
      • Name of photographer
      • Photographers website
      • Small context
      • All found one under the other, small text (approximately size 12), found at the top-centre of the page
  • Straight on to photographs
  • Photographs:
    • ALWAYS the same layout
    • Left page
      • Title of photograph in the bottom right corner
    • Right page
      • Photograph always same position
      • Centre of the page
      • White border
      • Varies in size – similar size but some images are square/cropped
  • Last page:
    • Same layout to first page
    • Left page
      • Blank white page
    • Right page
      • Title
      • Date
      • Name of photographer
      • Photographers website
      • Small “About me” section
      • All found one under the other, small text (approximately size 12), found at the top-centre of the page
  • Back cover:
    • First photograph shown within the book takes up the whole of the back cover (no border)
    • Same information that has been placed on the first and last pages can be found in bottom right corner (negative space)
      • Title
      • Date
      • Name of photographer
      • Photographers website
  • WHAT I LIKED:
    • Cropped photo used on front page – viewer knows straight away that it is a typical photo book
    • Simplistic front pages – suggests that the book is going to be an easy read
    • No large essay or foreword at beginning – I feel that these can occasionally take away from the images themselves, leaves nothing for the viewers imagination
    • The pattern and symmetrical feel of the book – rhythm shown throughout the book through the formatting of the images
    • Simplicity (photo and little title) – gave viewer detail of the subject but allowed imagination to take hold, giving each viewer an individual experience
    • The page transitions used on the MagCloud website – simple, no page turning effects so it doesn’t look like it is trying to be a stereotypical book, it is proud to be seen as an e-book
    • The “About Me” section – gave the viewer background information about the individual, including what area’s of photography they are interested in
  • WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE:
    • No gutter line – cannot tell where the left and right pages separate
    • Minimal text – although I do not like long forewords or essays within a photo book, I felt like the context given at the beginning of the book was very brief and descriptive; this could possibly be elaborated further
    • The fact that there was no copyright or professional looking, “must-have” elements

WHAT WILL I WANT TO INCLUDE IN MY OWN PHOTO BOOK/E-BOOK?

  • Cropped photograph that takes up whole of the front cover – viewer knows straight away that it is a typical photo book
  • Simplistic text/font – seen throughout photo book
  • Simplistic front pages – suggests that the book is going to be an easy read
  • Inclusion of copyright and other professional elements to be seen on the first pages – also suggests that this book is professionally made
  • Little foreword in order to introduce the concept of this particular site-specific brief
  • The linear pattern and symmetrical feel of the book – rhythm shown throughout the book through the formatting of the images
    • This linear pattern would anchor the subject of the images (the buildings) by representing their architectural structure
  • Simplicity (photo and little body of text) – give viewer detail of what the subject is but allows their imagination to take hold, giving each viewer an individual experience
  • Use of triptych’s – will use these in order to show the more detailed and abstract features of the building (they will, however, always be laid out in the same format
  • Photo and context given on back page – gives the viewer a taster of what is inside the book whilst also giving context from another persons perspective
  • An “About Me” section – given towards the end of the book; reflect the position of the small foreword – adds to symmetrical feel and flow of the book

DEVELOPMENT:

After completing all of this photo book research and spending time analyzing each of them, I then found myself in a bit of a predicament. All of a sudden, I started coming up with lots of different ways in which I could present my final images, some more creative than others. These ideas can be seen below:

IDEA 1(original idea)

  • Photo book and e-book using MagCloud – uses both types of images, date order, possible timeline graphics

IDEA 2

  • Archive style folder – mainly only documentary style images used (abstract images can be included), sections for each date (labeled), date order, include research (tea-stained/burnt to add age)

IDEA 3

  • Scrapbook/archive book – mainly only documentary style images used (abstract images can be included), date order, hand written, stuck in

IDEA 4

  • Timeline – use both types of images, create in Photoshop, one long print, date order

Looking over all of these ideas, the two that stood out for me personally is my original photo book and e-book idea and the timeline, as these use both sets of images which is what I stated I wanted to do earlier. However, as I am seriously considering changing my idea, during my next day at university, I plan on asking my peers and lecturers for their opinion in which direction I should take my project.

FINAL IDEA:

After talking to both my peers and my lecturers, we have decided that the best path to take in completing this project is that of the photo book and e-book, my original idea. Below I have placed some of the comments that were made during this feedback session, which I will take on board and incorporate into my final piece:

  • Map at the beginning of the book
    • Give the viewer an idea as to where in Coventry these buildings can be found – relates to the fact that it is a site-specific task
  • Appendix at the back of the book
    • Showing some of the relevant information that I found
    • Look at the book Celebrity by Kenji Hirasawa for ideas of layout
  • If the perspective shown within the image does not add any compositional advantage to the photograph, change it either using a tilt-shift lens or in post production (Photoshop)
    • Use Photoshop
      • May need to re-shoot some images – WEATHER DEPENDENT
      • Use Photoshop – easier to understand than the tilt-shift lens
  • Do the layout of the images work – i.e. does the triptych work with the main image? YES.
    • The work isn’t a stereotypical photo book, it doesn’t appear as cohesive as simpler examples; it relates to the mix of buildings that is found within Coventry – it is not a cohesive, stereotypical city
  • Due to the time scale, is it acceptable to hand in a PDF as the “physical” version of the book?
    • Have a look at the print bureau
    • Does it take less time then that of MagCloud?
    • If so, get it printed from there – would rather you spend all of your time on creating the perfect book

What do I want to achieve and what do I want to receive from the viewer?

Creating both the photo book and e-book will allow me to achieve the main aspect that I wanted to show through comparing my images, that I stated earlier: I want to show the viewer the differences in architectural design through time through the use of different styles of photography (conceptual and abstract). Creating these photo books will also hopefully allow the viewer to engage their imagination, which is one of the key parts of any photo book that I enjoy (pointed out through my photo book research).

How will I achieve this?

In terms of achieving what I originally set out to do in my images (showing the viewer the differences in architectural design through time, which I feel like I completed successfully), I will also design the photo books in such a way as to anchor this main contextual point. For example, I plan on putting the images in date order of when they were built, along with the written date (to make it obvious for the viewer), and I am also considering the use of timeline graphics. As for the engaging of the viewer’s imagination, as stated above, I plan on showing the triptych of abstract images first (on the left hand page) as a quick conscious clue of the design and era of the building shown on the right page.

ORIGINAL PLANNED PHOTO BOOK (Before the Feedback Session):

I actually created this plan before the feedback session and so have posted the original drawing. However, I do intend on including the feedback that was given to me within this session (these can be found above).

Photobook Plan

RESEARCH INTO APPENDICES – Looking at Celebrity by Kenji Hirasawa

  • Context – Thermal imaging of people posing next to celebrity mannequins at Madame Tussauds in London
    • Do not find out the context until we reach the appendix at the back
  • Appendix
    • Found at the back after the images
    • Viewer is unsure of the context until they finish reading the appendix
    • Even then, they are still unsure until they realize that some of the celebrity’s that have been named have died
    • “In Order of Appearance” – relates to subject
    • Found central to the page (right hand page)

How will I incorporate this idea into my own book?

  • Will find it at the back of the book
  • Will include the current names of the buildings – will have to make this clear
  • Will also include what they were originally (if anything)
  • No timeline graphics – have been used throughout the book and so using it again will over do it

RE-SHOT CONCEPTUAL IMAGES: 

Unfortunately, when going to re-shoot some of my conceptual images in order to experiment with reducing the perspective in post-production, the weather was not as anticipated and so I was unable to achieve some successful shots. (The weather did, however, brighten up a lot closer to the deadline date but unfortunately, my final photo book had already been sent off for printing). This is why I have decided to experiment with the vertical perspective slider in Photoshop on some of my original images, but have kept approximately half of the images as the original (either due to the perspective being part of the composition of the image, or the Photoshop tool cropping the image too much). Below you can see the original images that I experimented with, along with the unsuccessful re-shot, edited images:

Original Perspective Photos:

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Re-shot Photos:

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FINAL PHOTO BOOK/E-BOOK:

Coventry Architecture: An Illustrated Timeline

By Holly Constantine

72 pages, published 11/17/2013

This book is my final product that I created for a site-specific brief that I was given during my second year studying Photography at Coventry University. It is a conceptual response to architecture within the City and shows an illustrated timeline of the buildings that I focused on.

SYNOPSIS OF PHOTO BOOK FEATURES:

After completing my physical photo book and e-book, the next and final step that I needed to take was to critically reflect upon my finished product(s). Below you will find summaries about why I chose to include certain aspects within my photo books, followed by a brief reflection discussing if I achieved what I set out to and if I would change anything to make the piece stronger.

Front Cover:

I decided to use a cropped version of one of my most successful conceptual images as the front cover. I wanted to do this because, when researching the layout of different photo books, I found that I, as a viewer, was more attracted to those that used an image on the front page. I therefore thought that the inclusion of this image would hopefully not only attract a number of viewers, but it would also enable the majority to understand that this book was indeed that of a photo book. I also chose this particular image because I thought that it gave the viewer a clue as to what the book was about without giving away all of its context.

Back Cover:

When looking at the back page of my final product, some viewers may be able to see that this layout has also been inspired by some of the photo books that I researched. I included a stereotypical blurb, written by Oliver Dowling, in order to highlight a part of the concept of this book from a perspective that was not my own. I also included one of my abstract images as I thought that this would hint to the viewer that my photo book doesn’t only consist of conceptual images. I also chose this particular image as, due to the fact that it is a photograph of a closed door, it can be used by different viewers to represent different things, depending on the type of photo book they were viewing (physical or e-book). What I mean by this is that with the physical book, most viewers will tend to read the blurb before they read the book, allowing this image to symbolize the opening and beginning of the book. Whereas, with the e-book, the majority of the viewers will tend to read the blurb last (as it is the last page shown) which means that the closed door will therefore symbolize the finishing of the e-book.

Images on the Front and Back Cover:

As the viewer may also notice, I decided to use a modern architectural conceptual image on the front cover and a historical abstract image on the back cover. I did this because it not only mirrors the layout inside the book (conceptual image on the right page and the abstract images on the left) but it also enables some viewers to create a subconscious idea about the timeline design that I used throughout the book (they obviously may not realize this until after they have read the book itself).

Colour Scheme:

I have also used a certain burgundy colour on the back page and some of my pages within the books. This layout is inspired by some of the photo books that I researched and the certain burgundy colour is representative of the colour used for some of the researched historical journals.

Layout of Simple First and Last Pages:

I wanted to set out this photo book in a similar way to that of a professional photo book in order to give it an aesthetic appeal and sense of professionalism. That is why I have included some simple first and last pages that include title pages, copyright, and links to blogs and any pages that I own. I also wanted to keep it simple at the start and end of the book because this layout can be used to indicate to the viewer the ends of the book whilst also giving the artifact consistency and a flow.

Written Page Formats:

As the viewer will eventually see, in regards to the written pages, I decided to keep the layout the same throughout. Having the title of the section on the left hand page, in the same position as to that of the timeline dates, also adds to the layout found throughout the book, once again enhancing the books consistency and flow.

Introduction:

The inclusion of an introduction is also a way of increasing the professionalism of my photo books. I wanted to include this self-written introduction as it gives the viewer a brief idea as to the contextualization behind my project and final product whilst also giving them a slight clue as to what to expect from the book itself.

Use of a Map:

I have decided to include a map of the area that I photographed in. This was suggested by the group feedback session as they thought that giving the viewer an idea as to where these buildings can be found would increase the successfulness of my photo book. The inclusion of this map also anchors the fact that this is a site-specific task and allows the majority of viewers to understand the importance this aspect played on the completion of the project.

Timeline Graphics:

I added the timeline graphics as a way of visually enabling most of the viewers to understand the context and aim (I want to show the viewer the differences in architectural design through time) behind the piece. This timeline also makes it easier for a number of viewers to understand that these images should be viewed as a collection rather than individually.

Abstract, Creative Style Photographs:

After I had taken these initial photographs, I felt that my abstract images were slightly stronger than my conceptual style images as I felt that these offer the viewers the opportunity to use their imagination. These photographs show the viewer details of the building that the majority would not normally notice on a first glance, which allows them to engage with their imagination in deciding where these specific features would be found. These images also allow the viewers to appreciate the individual features of the building before being confronted with viewing the building as a whole.

I have shown these abstract images in a triptych layout. This is because this can be used to represent the three spires that made Coventry famous. They have also been displayed in a horizontal, linear triptych as a way of representing the timeline on a smaller scale, whilst also representing the majority of linear shapes found within the exterior of the buildings themselves. These images have also, deliberately, not been lined up with the top of the conceptual photo on the right hand page as this would seem to give the viewer a faster leading line to the conceptual photo, allowing them to bypass these images quickly without taking them in. The triptych is also placed on the right hand page as, if the viewer were to be flicking through the physical photo book in the stereotypical fashion, it would be these pages that they would see and so would hopefully offer them clues about the book whilst grabbing their interest.

Conceptual Style Photographs:

Again, after I had taken these initial photographs, I felt that these images were also relatively successful but were not as successful as the abstract images when displayed individually. However, when displayed with the triptych of abstract images, the context of both the collection of images and the photo book widens visually and historically, offering the viewer a greater visual experience. These conceptual images also seem to act as a “spot the feature” photograph, meaning that the viewer can potentially take longer in appreciating this image by trying to spot the individual features shown in the abstract photos on the previous page.

The presentation of these conceptual images, as singular images, also appears to represent the bulk and size of the buildings. The fact that they have also been displayed as a solitary photograph also represents that I wanted the viewer to concentrate on this particular building at this point in time.

Photograph Information:

The first piece of information viewed next to the images is the date of when the construction of the building was taking place. This relates to my overall aim of this project (I want to show the viewer the differences in architectural design through time) and the timeline graphic that I used to in order to represent my aim visually. The next set of information given underneath the images is the address of the building. I wanted to use the address rather than the name of the building as, over time, the buildings name may have changed, and the inclusion of the address may also remind the viewers about the fact that this project was created to a site-specific brief.

Relevant Research given at the End of the Book:

Another feature of my book that was suggested during the group feedback session was that of the appendix at the back filled with any relevant research that I found for each of the individual buildings that I photographed. Within this appendix, I listed the buildings, in the order that they appeared within the photo book, by their current known name. This tiny amount of information already added to the history behind the individual buildings. I then included any information that I found that suggested visual changes (i.e. names or structures) to that specific building through time. Although throughout the book I was representing general changes in the design of the architecture over time, this section adds to the book by hopefully enabling the viewer to understand that this is in fact a generalization of architectural changes, and it shows that each individual building has its own historical timeline.

Biography:

Towards the end of the book, the viewer can also see that I have included a biography written, again, by Oliver Dowling. This has simply been included as it automatically adds professionalism and allows some of the viewers to understand any personal external factors that may have contributed to the completion of this project.

Physical Photo Book:

I wanted to create the physical photo book as a way of representing how I found the majority of the historical information: through historical journals. I also feel that a photo book has more value in the sense that it is an artifact, which means that it will be able to date both visually and through the information stored within it, also symbolizing that of the historical journals I used through my research.

E-Book:

I also wanted to create an e-book as I realized that for the majority of the more modern buildings, I found the research online rather than in collected artifacts. The e-book therefore represents the technology and software that I used to find this information whilst also giving the viewer hyperlinks to follow if they wanted to see the process behind the creation of the final products. They will essentially be conducting their own research, turning this e-book into a more interactive experience.

Creating both of these types of photo book has therefore anchored the differences in historical and modern that have been portrayed through the images of these buildings.

 

CRITICAL REFLECTION:

Overall, looking at both my photo book and e-book as completed products, I feel that they have been successful in showing what I wanted to achieve. (To reiterate, I wanted to show the viewer the differences in architectural design through time through the use of different styles of photography.) I feel that this has been achieved, not through my individual images, but through the collection of images along with the presentation and final products that I decided to use.

However, as with any project, I feel that there are always areas to improve upon. The main aspect in which I would change if I had the time or if I revisited this project, is that I would re-shoot my conceptual response images in order to be able to reduce the perspective in post-production. Although I feel that the inclusion of perspective in some of the images as a compositional technique actually enhances my personal response to the architecture, I feel that collaborating the images so that they are all similar, with no use of perspective, would make the collection more cohesive as a piece.

Also, when critically looking upon my completed physical photo book, there are some aspects that I am disappointed with. The first is the material of the pages. Unfortunately, with how thin the pages are and the glossy paper that was used, the viewer can not only see other images through the pages, but light is also being reflected off of the page. This means that both of these aspects take away from the individual images that are displayed on this particular page. I also found that the text on the physical photo book is a lot larger than expected which I unfortunately feel is another aspect that takes away from the images shown throughout the book. The justified text in some places also makes a number of lines difficult to read, taking the viewers concentration away from the images themselves. Another area in which I am highly disappointed in is that, due to the paper that this book has been printed on, the vibrancy of the colour within the images has also decreased, making both the images and the book slightly less aesthetically pleasing. Another aspect that I feel may have decreased the successfulness of the physical photo book is that of the perfect binding. Although this added to the professionalism portrayed by this artifact, it created off-centred images whilst also loosing some of the photographs and graphics in the gutter. I have also realized that for this to be a successful photo book, the covers should be hardback in order to add to the professionalism of the book. This is because, with the book being a soft copy, paired with the image on the front page, the viewer may be able to mistake this book as a brochure for that particular building (The Herbert Art Gallery and Museum).

After apprehending these problems that have come to light with the creation of the physical photo book, and for reasons stated above (under the “E-Book” section), I therefore feel that the e-book is the most successful final product of the two.