350MC Working with Photography in Context – Creating the Presentation

This blog post has been created in order to present the development and process behind the creation of my visual presentation for the 350MC Working with Photography in Context module. In this post, you will be able to find copies of the presentations that I created (and which essay they accompany) followed by reflections on aspects within the presentation (and whether these aspects/changes were influenced by any feedback), and feedback that I gained on each of the visual presentation drafts.

To see all of the drafts that I have created for the Symposium essay, please view my “350MC Working With Photography In Context – Writing the Essay” post at https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/350mc-working-with-photography-in-context-writing-the-essay/, and for a more detailed analysis of the general development undertaken throughout this module (including original ideas, one-to-one and group tutorials, research, and developments of my idea), please view my “350MC Working With Photography In Context – Development Of Idea” at https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/350mc-working-with-photography-in-context-development-of-idea/.

 


 

Presentation Draft One:

Presentation – Draft 1

Accompanying Essay – (Remembrance: Landscape Photography and Memory – Draft 1)

 

Aspects within the Presentation:

Title Slide (Slide 1):

  • Included a title page to introduce both the paper and myself to the audience (pretty self-explanatory)

Quote Slides (Slides 2-4, 9 and 14-15):

  • Included slides with important quotes from the presentation in order to get the key points (of the presentation) across to the audience
    • As the audience will both hear and see the quote, it will enhance the quotes importance whilst also emphasizing it’s relevance to the section of the talk, as the audience will be able to view the quote as it is being discussed further (they will be able to apply the new theories to the quote that is being displayed, keeping them informed and providing them with a greater understanding)

Introduction Slide to Case Studies (Slides 5 and 10):

  • Included an introduction slide to the photographers/case studies project to provide a clue for the viewer that the essay will be moving on from the more academic, psychological section, to an analytical, photographic section
    • This introductory slide also provides the viewer with an understanding that the following project is a chosen case study (rather than random photographs) which also enhances its importance within the presentation

Case Study Examples (Slides 6-8 and 11-13):

  • I obviously also used photographic examples of the case studies discussed in order to offer the viewer a visual example whilst continuing with the discussion, relating them to different theories
    • The case studies I chose obviously related to the overarching theme given throughout the presentation (landscapes and memories) whilst also relating to more specific theories discussed prior to the case studies analysis
    • This allows the viewer to gain a greater understanding of the relevance of the case studies within the theories I have placed them in as they can identify what I am discussing
    • I also chose examples that greatly related to the idea of loss and remembrance (an underlying, overarching theme), through their photographic subject and titles, as the presentation is about reconnecting to lost loved ones
    • I also chose examples that greatly linked to theories discussed in previous sections (as suggested above)
      • For Ann Chwatsky, I placed her in the section discussing representations (in relation to memory triggers), which can be symbolized through the fact that she uses montages to create visual representations
      • For Mikael Levin, I placed him in the section discussing repetition (in relation to memory triggers), which can be symbolized through the fact that he is repeating his fathers past journey and therefore the landscape memory triggers he used

 

Feedback Gained:

(From Anthony Luvera in a Group Tutorial on 6th January 2015)

  • In this feedback session, I mentioned that I thought I need to add more slides (between quotes) too my presentation
    • I am planning on making slides that show the questions I pose to the audience at the beginning of some of the sections to allow them to relate the theory I go on to discuss, back to the question I am answering
  • The presentation istoo text heavy
    • I understand that you want to get the key quotes across, but at the moment it looks more like a lecturers presentation
    • You need visual examples to anchor the text
    • You can also get rid of the introductory artist slides (for example “Ann Chwatsky “WHEN I WAS A GIRL”…”) and simply incorporate this information into the titles given with the visual examples

 


 

Presentation Draft Two:

Presentation – Draft 2

Accompanying Essay – (Remembrance: Landscape Photography and Memory – Draft 5)

 

Changing Aspects within the Presentation:

Title Slide (Slide 1):

  • I have included an “Example Title” slide as I am currently going through the process of rethinking my title

Question Slides (Slides 2 and 14):

  • Added question slides because (as suggested above in the Group Tutorial with Anthony), I wanted to include slides that show the questions I pose to the audience at the beginning of some of the sections to allow them to relate the theory I go on to discuss, back to the question I am answering

Blank Slides (Slides 4, 6, 8, 10, 15, 17, 26):

  • I decided to add blank slides to reduce the fact that it was so text heavy (as suggested above in the Group Tutorial with Anthony)
  • I also wanted to add blank slides because I thought that some of the theories I move on to discuss didn’t necessarily relate to the quote on the screen (they instead introduced another section of the essay, for example), so I thought that if I kept the quote up it would cause confusion within the audience
    • I therefore thought that placing a blank slide would minimize the risk of confusion and allow the audience to focus primarily on what I am discussing at the time
  • I also decided to add a blank slide at the end of my presentation in order to symbolize the end of the talk

Photograph of Old Photos (Slide 7):

  • I included this photograph of the old photos to add a more visual aspect to the presentation, reducing the fact that it is so text heavy (as suggested above in the Group Tutorial with Anthony)
    • I chose this particular photograph (of old photos) as it relates to the discussion on memory triggers and how they are associated with reverie memories
      • Photographs document the event that is stored within a memory, meaning that they are, obviously, related to the memory
    • I do, however, plan on taking my own photograph of some landscape photographs that act as my own, personal memory triggers, in order to represent the subjective and personal characteristic that is associated with memory and memory triggers

Removal of Introduction Slide to Case Studies (Slides 10 and 17):

  • As suggested in the Group Tutorial with Anthony above, I removed the Introduction Slide to the Case Studies (that included information on the photographer and the project)
  • I instead added another blank slide to act as a break between the textual slides and the case study (symbolizing its importance in a similar, but not as obvious, way as the introduction slide in the previous draft)

Adding Case Studies Information:

  • Again, as suggested above in the Group Tutorial with Anthony Luvera, I incorporated the information from the “Introduction Slide” to the Case Studies in the caption underneath the case study image examples
    • I also removed the text that was included with the photograph in Ann Chwatsky’s examples and added it to the caption I created in order to create a more uniformed presentation
    • These captions also enhanced the professionalism of the presentation format, which also, obviously, increased the professionalism of the presentation in itself

Main Concluding Points (Slides 24-25):

  • I included the main concluding points as two separate slides in order to enhance it’s importance as a philosophical viewpoint whilst also symbolizing to the viewer that it is the beginning of the conclusion

List of References (Slides 21):

  • I also included a list of references of the quotes and visual examples towards the end of my presentation to allow the viewer to gain an understanding of where I got them from incase they wish to either read up on the theories I discussed or simply find the photographs I included

 

Feedback Gained:

(From Kate McMillan in a One-to-One Tutorial on 20th January 2015)

  • Include more examples of the photographers work
  • Remove the blank slides – people can multi-task
  • In terms of visual aids, you could just show an image of the landscape
    • As long as it is given context through what you’re saying at the time
    • You use an image like you use a quote, it solidifies and evidences what you’re saying
    • An image is like a gift to a visual audience – it helps break up the philosophical theory that you’re presenting to them

 


 

Presentation Draft Three:

Presentation Draft Three Plan:

 

Presentation – Draft 3

Accompanying Essay – (A Pathway to the Past – Draft 16)

 

Changing Aspects within the Presentation:

Removing the Blank Slides:

  • As suggested by Kate McMillan in a one-to-one tutorial above, I decided to remove the blank slides as “the audience can multi-task”
    • Instead, the quotes will remain on the screen whilst I am discussing the following theories which will offer the audience the opportunity to relate the quotes to the theories discussed

Added Photograph of Old Photos Sooner (Slide 3):

  • I decided to add this photograph sooner in order to offer the audience a visual representation of what I was discussing (how “individuals can control the past through the use of mundane, everyday objects”), which was suggested by Kate in the previous one-to-one session

Repeated Photograph of Old Photos (Slide 6):

  • I decided to keep this photograph to illustrate the “memory trigger” section that I used it for within the previous draft as, when looking back over this section, I couldn’t really think about what else could be used to illustrate this section (that relates it back to photography)
  • However, I am unsure whether I can/should use the same photograph twice in one presentation so I plan on asking for Anthony Luvera’s feedback

Adding Diagrams (Slides 5, 9, and 17-18):

  • I included more academic diagrams in order to aid the audiences understanding of the complex psychological theories that I discuss within the presentation
    • This solidifies what I’m saying by providing the audience with evidence about the theories I discussed (as suggested by Kate in the previous one-to-one session)
    • Some of these diagrams also had to be created, by myself, as I couldn’t find any simple diagrams that I could use to illustrate this complex theory in such a short period of time
      • I therefore took time considering the section I was looking to visually represent and created diagrams that I thought encapsulated the main points of the discussed process whilst also trying to keep it relatively simple so that the audience could understand it
      • However, as I made them myself, I need to talk to Anthony to see if I can include these within my presentation

Adding Personal Landscape Photographs (Slides 8, 15 and 25):

  • I included some personal landscape photographs in order to provide the audience with “ a visual gift” (as described by Kate in the previous one-to-one session)
  • The photographs that I chose illustrate what is being discussed at the time which allows the audience the opportunity to apply the theories discussed to the visual example I have up on the screen
    • I decided to use my own photographs as the overarching theme to this presentation is about using landscape photographs as personal memory triggers
      • As this topic of memory and memory triggers is so subjective and personal, I decided to use my own photographs (that I knew act as personal memory triggers) in order to represent this very important aspect of the memory subject
      • However, I am unsure whether I am “allowed” to use my own photographs within the presentation so I am planning on asking for Anthony’s opinion
    • Slide 8 (Snowy Mountain at Sunset)
      • This photograph has been chosen as this section discusses ideas surrounding (landscape) photographs and how they can act as such powerful memory triggers through the photographic trace – I feel that this photo represents the discussion as this photograph acts as a very powerful memory trigger for me
      • I also chose this photograph as, half way through the section, I say “… landscapes progress through stages of change” which I feel is represented through the fact that this landscape has been photographed with snow on and at sunset which symbolizes an example of how it can change
    • Slide 15 (Mountain and Tarn)
      • I decided to choose this photograph for this section as I take time discussing landscapes in themselves (not as a photograph) and how people “best remember memories through their association with different places” – the place photographed in this image acts as a very personal memory trigger for me
    • Slide 25 (Mountains and Road)
      • I wanted to “end” (“end” is in “” because I have still included the blank slide to emphasize the finishing of the presentation) with a landscape photograph taken by myself (if it is allowed) in order to represent the two main aspects of the presentation:
        • That it’s about landscape photographs and personal memory triggers (this photo provides me with a personal memory trigger)
        • And that this presentation has been written and presented by me
      • I chose this particular photo as I thought it greatly related to my final concluding statement about “providing people with a pathway to the past” – this can be symbolized through the inclusion of the road (the “path”) and the idea of an individual travelling towards the past through it’s use of perspective (travelling) and darkened horizon (the past)

Adding More Examples of Case Studies (Slides 10-13 and 19-23):

  • As suggested by Kate in the previous one-to-one session, I also decided to add more examples of the photographers/case studies work in order to provide the audience with a greater understanding of the collection/project as a whole as well as offering them more examples and time to relate these pieces of work to the theories I discussed

Main Concluding Points (Slides 24):

  • Similar to the previous presentation draft, I decided to included the main concluding question that I have been discussing within the presentation to enhance it’s importance as a philosophical viewpoint whilst also symbolizing to the viewer that it is the beginning of the conclusion

 

Email to Anthony – Questions Regarding Changed Aspects:

As suggested above, after making this particular presentation draft, I had a couple of questions that I wanted to run by Anthony. I therefore decided to send him an email with these question which he later answered/offered feedback on in a one-to-one tutorial the following day (please see below).

  1. As you will see, I have included two slides that include an image of a pile of photos – as I have included them twice, should I try and find a different photo or is it okay to use it more than once?
  2. I’ve also left space to include some landscape images (examples have been placed in to remind me!) – I was wondering if I was able to use my own photographs or if you would suggest I use a mixture of personal, archived family and professional images of landscapes?
  3. The Mediatory Memory Pathways – these are still in their beginning stages, but once I finalize them, do you think they are okay to include in the presentation? I’ve had a look and couldn’t find any “professional” diagrams… And I promise they make a lot more sense with the accompanying essay!

 

Feedback Gained:

(From Anthony Luvera in a One-to-One Tutorial on 3rd February 2015)

Below you will see a typed up documentation of the feedback Anthony offered me within this one-to-one tutorial, followed by a scan of the changes he suggested I make on the printed out copy of the presentation slides.

  • Why have you included quotes?
    • My answer – As this section of the essay discusses this question in more depth by relating to other theories, I thought it would be good to offer the viewer something visual to relate back to whilst I’m discussing these complicated ideas
  • You can go back to the same photo if you wish, as long as it fits with the section it accompanies in the essay
  • You can use your own photos as long as it serves the paper – you don’t want to use it as personal advertising, that’s not what the symposium is for
    • We’ll test to see if the photos fit during the dress rehearsals
  • The mediatory memory pathways are very well constructed and I agree that they are needed as visual representations for the complex idea you are discussing
  • Don’t think you need the question of “Why have I focused this discussion solely on LANDSCAPE photographs as an example of traces of the past” – instead you could use your own image which then gives you the opportunity to use the first person (as discussed above)
  • For the second and third memory pathway diagrams, you need to make them more distinguishable – perhaps change the title of them so that the audience knows what they’re looking t is different

 


 

Presentation Draft Four:

Presentation – Draft 4

Accompanying Essay – (A Pathway to the Past – Draft 20)

 

Changing Aspects within the Presentation:

Adding More Diagrams (Slides 2 and 8):

  • After I had made changes to the previous essay that I had written, I decided to add more diagrams in order to provide a visual representation of some of the more complex, psychological theories I was now discussing
  • This was to aid the audiences understanding of these more complex theories, which, as stated above in for the previous presentation draft, solidifies what I’m saying by providing the audience with evidence about the theories I discussed (as suggested by Kate in a previous one-to-one session)
  • These diagrams were also created, by myself, due to similar reasons above (I couldn’t find any simple diagrams that I could use to illustrate this complex theory in such a short period of time), which isn’t a problem as Anthony didn’t mention that it was in the previous feedback session!

Removal of First “Double Photo” of Old Photographs:

  • I also decided to remove the first of the double photo of the Old Photographs as I felt that this image didn’t fit with the altered section of the essay

Kept Personal Landscape Photographs (Slides 10, 15 and 25):

  • I also decided to keep the personal landscape photographs (after receiving the go ahead from Anthony in the previous one-to-one tutorial) as I felt that they served the paper (again, as suggested by Anthony)
    • This is because they symbolized the theories (and some of the phrases) that were being discussed in the section of the essay they were representing (see above for more information)

Removal of “Why have I focused this discussion solely on LANDSCAPE photographs as an example of traces of the past?” Question Slide (Slide 15):

  • As suggested by Anthony above, I decided to remove the “Why have I focused this discussion solely on LANDSCAPE photographs as an example of traces of the past?” slide as the following photo I used to represent the section that discusses the answer to the question obviously illustrates this question as well

Making the Memory Pathway Diagrams More Distinguishable (Slides 17-18):

  • As suggested by Anthony in the one-to-one tutorial above, I needed to make the two Memory Pathway Diagrams more distinguishable as they were very similar
    • To do this, I simply changed the title to offer the difference that I was discussing between the memory pathways, as well as changing the colour of the differentiated aspects of the diagram to clearly show which sections had changed
    • This allows the viewer to identify the changed aspects sooner which is necessary as the complex diagram is not displayed for a long period of time

 

Feedback Gained:

(From Anthony Luvera and Daniel Campbell Blight in a Dress Rehearsal on 18th February 2015)

  • This presentation was a very technical piece of writing and it evidenced the wide range of research you underwent throughout this module – It was very diligently researched and very well structured
    • However, because of this, for the first half of your presentation, I couldn’t necessarily tell that it was a photography presentation
    • So what I would say is that although it showed really good research, I think that you should illustrate it with the inclusion of more photographs
    • Not necessarily your own (which can be used a couple of times within the presentation) but I think you should use a number of examples to show how diverse landscape photography is
    • An example would be when you say “photographs of landscapes can act as memory triggers”, perhaps show an image of a landscape that is a personal memory trigger for you
    • You should use images so that the audience can look at them so that they illustrate the ideas that are resounding in the audience’s mind
    • This will also focus the presentation more on photography
  • I think the diagrams are very difficult to process in such a short period of time
  • Not sure you need the diagram slides and the quote slides because I feel your explanations are really clear – you’re language is clear enough, it makes sense
  • I’m also not sure about that question slide
  • I think you should just tinker with that section a little bit – the question is so broad and it doesn’t just relate to your topic
    • It feels kind of “left-field” – it relates, of course, but maybe don’t use the slide to add the emphasis on it
    • Just think about the question and how it relates to what you are talking about

 


 

Final Presentation:

Final Presentation Plan:

This presentation plan includes information about the changes to the visual presentation, which includes the process of analyzing the theories and language of each section, to see what kind of landscape photograph would best fit.

 

Remembrance: Landscape Photography and Memory Presentation – Holly Constantine

Accompanying Essay – (Remembrance: Landscape Photography and Memory – Holly Constantine)

 

Changing Aspects within the Presentation:

Title Page (Slide One):

  • For this presentation, I changed the title as it was suggested that the title for my previous essay didn’t really encapsulate the feel of the talk as it was too poetic and “cheesy”
  • I have also decided to keep the title slide up for the whole of the introduction (which has come about due to the removal of diagrams – see below), which, on review, I feel works as it is introducing the paper and allows the audience to understand how the title relates to the content of the paper

Removing Quote Slides:

  • As suggested by Anthony Luvera and Daniel Campbell Blight in the dress rehearsal above, I decided to remove the quote slides from my presentation (and replace them with appropriate landscape photographs – see below)
    • Although I originally thought that the inclusion of them would enhance it’s importance whilst also emphasizing it’s relevance to the section of the talk as the audience will be able to view the quote as it is being discussed further, it was suggested that quotes are usually used in longer lectures rather than short 10-minute presentations
    • I also decided to talk to members of the audience to gain their view-point on the matter and they suggested that the inclusion of quotes would just look like I’m reading off the screen and that the inclusion of photographic examples would allow them to be more stimulated by the talk as the can actively associate the quotes and discussions to the visual example displayed

Removing Diagrams:

  • As also suggested by Anthony Luvera and Daniel Campbell Blight I decided to remove the diagrams from the presentation (and replace them with appropriate landscape photographs – see below)
    • As suggested in the dress rehearsal feedback, they thought that there wasn’t enough time for the audience to fully grasp the concept of the diagram and that my explanations and language was clear enough to allow the viewers to make sense of what I was discussing without the need of the diagrams
    • I have therefore decided to replace the diagrams with appropriate landscape photographs that I feel illustrate the section and theories that I am discussing (please see below, under “Adding More Landscape Photographs” for more information)
    • However, as I know this is such a technical paper, I have decided to prepare myself with some answers to possible questions, including one that may offer the suggestion of including diagrams

Removing the Concluding Question Slide (Slide 24):

  • As suggested by Anthony in the dress rehearsal, I also decided to remove the concluding question slide at the end og the presentation
  • Although I originally thought that, as seen from my previous presentation drafts, including this concluding question on a slide would enhance it’s importance by reminding the viewer about the main context of the talk, whilst also symbolizing the end of the conclusion, as I decided to remove all the other textual slides, I realized that keeping this one in would disrupt the flow of the presentation
  • I therefore decided, as with the other textual slides, to replace the slide with an appropriate landscape photograph that I feel illustrates the concluding paragraph I am discussing (please see below, under “Adding More Landscape Photographs” for more information)

Adding More Landscape Photographs (Slides 2-3, 5-7, and 15-17):

  • After the dress rehearsal feedback, I also decided to incorporate a lot more landscape photographs within my presentation
  • As, as suggested above, my essay is so academic, when I presented it with my previous, more technical draft of my presentation, I soon realized that the presentation came across very intense
    • The removal of most of the textual aspects, as well as the inclusion of more landscape images therefore allowed the intensity of my overall presentation to decrease
    • It also allowed the presentation to focus more on the idea of photography as it seemed very psychology based with the previous, more technical presentation – the academic paper was balanced with the use of the visual aids
  • As suggested above from opinions of possible audience members, the inclusion of these landscape images also allow the audience to feel more stimulated by the talk by allowing them the opportunity to actively associate the theories and quotes that I discuss to the visual example displayed on-screen
    • They act as a gift to the audience by breaking up the philosophical theory that I am presenting to them (as suggested by Kate in a previous tutorial) and they illustrate the resounding ideas that are occurring in the audience’s mind (as suggested by Anthony in the dress rehearsal feedback above)
  • I also decided to include a range of landscape images (from numerous individuals) in order to provide examples of the diversity of landscape photography as well as representing the fact that, although memory is a personal topic, many individuals can use landscape images as memory triggers
    • I took a lot of time considering what kind of landscape photographs to include for each section (based on the theories discussed and the language/phrases used) which can be found above in the scans for my “Final Presentation Plan”
  • The inclusion of all of these landscape photographs also meant that the presentation was able to focus more on photography (as also suggested above)

Adding an Extra Example of Ann Chwatsky’s Work (and Altering the Order) (Slides 10-14):

  • When I went through the dress rehearsal I also realized that I needed to add another Ann Chwatsky image as I had recently added another sentence to the section where I discussed her work which therefore required another example photograph
  • Once I added this image, I also decided to have a look through the order of the photographs to see if they worked well with the sentences they were illustrating
    • This resulted in a couple of changes to the order as (as stated above) I like to order them to specific words and phrases of the section that they illustrate (Please see “Final Presentation Plan” above for more information on planning the order of the images)
    • After doing this for Ann Chwatsky’s work, I also quickly looked through the work of Mikael Levin to see if his work was ordered appropriately for his section – after doing this I thought that the order was fine so kept it the same

Removing the Blank Slide at the End of the Presentation:

  • Finally, I also decided to remove the blank slide at the end of the presentation
  • Now, although I originally thought that this blank slide would symbolize the end of my talk, as stated above, I thought that it would be good for me to end the presentation on a personal photograph of mine (as it relates to the personal aspect of memory triggers that was discussed throughout the presentation and the section it represents, whilst also highlighting the fact that the presentation was by me)
  • Also, as I am on the events management team for the Symposium Event, after each presentation, we have decided to include a slide with the Collective Vision logo and the name of the speaker and their Twitter handle for the question and answer section (which essentially replaces the use of the blank slide anyway)
Advertisements