352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research

 As discussed in my one-to-one session with Anthony (on 14th January 2015 and 11th February 2015), I will be splitting my research into five suggested research groups (and three groups I feel may be appropriate): Academic, Location, Photographic, Technical, Representation of the Land, Personal, Equipment and Editing Software, and Presentation Options. (Please note: some of the resources included within these research sections can link to more than one of the research categories stated above. In this case, I have simply included them in the research section that suits the aspect of the work that I am looking at for my FMP).

This blog post is therefore dedicated to the research that I have conducted into different photographers/artists/writers that can offer me inspiration for experimentation in technical aspects I may not have used before (including photographic techniques, and the use of text, audio, or video). Within this research section you will find the name of the photographers/artists/writers and the projects that I have researched, examples of their work (if applicable), a link to their website, and brief reflections on their work followed by how I may use them as inspiration for my FMP.

 



PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES:

 

The Marshes” by Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th October 2014), he suggested that I look at Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig’s “The Marshes”

  • After the discussions that we had in this one-to-one session, I knew that Matt Johnston not only wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to the aesthetics of Lustig’s images, but that he also wanted me to look into the general concept behind the project and to reflect on some of the more unique aspects included in the final photobook output (please note, I was unable to get a hold of this photo book in video form, hence the inclusion of photographs instead)
  • I therefore decided to conduct some brief online research into the concept surrounding this particular project, and soon found a review by Josh Loeb that provided me with the relevant information I was after (the link to this review can be found below)
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include research that discuses the concept of the project, the aesthetics of the images, as well as reflections on some of the more unique aspects included in the final output, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (all of which can be found below):

 

http://hackneycitizen.co.uk/2013/07/05/marshes-samuel-wright-josh-lustig-review/

 

The Concept:

  • After reading the review by Josh Loeb, it provided me with information suggesting that “The Marshes” book includes a combination of photographs by Josh Lustig and short fiction stories by Samuel Wright that depict the unfamiliar marsh lands in Hackney
  • Discussing the main theme of “wildness” the photographs and text included in the book have been split into a main story called “Best Friend” (“which uses the relationship between two schoolboys as a vehicle for portraying wildness”) and a variety of different short stories that not only relate to the overarching theme of wildness, but also further discuss some of the other topics illustrated in the main story
  • Looking into the concept surrounding this photobook, I therefore think that Matt Johnston suggested I research this particular section of the publication (it’s concept) as it can relate to my FMP through the fact that it photographically and textually explores a particular landscape – within my FMP, I am photographically “exploring” or documenting the Lake District, and can use text to further evidence the methodology and concept behind my project

 

The Photographs (by Josh Lustig):

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  • In relation to Josh Lustig’s photographs that have been included within this photobook, the first thing that the viewer may notice is the fact that Lustig’s images are displayed in black and white
    • This photographic decision, along with the fact that many of the images appear to be slightly underexposed, can be used by the viewer to represent the dark and mysterious atmosphere elicited by the typically unknown location of the Hackney marshes, which can in turn be used to enhance the symbolization of “wildness” portrayed within the images (which, as suggested above, is the main theme surrounding this particular piece of work)
  • After noticing the black and white colouration of the images, the viewers then focus on the subject of the photographs and soon notices that all of Lustig’s images can be categorized under the umbrella term of landscapes
    • However, as the viewer continues through the book, they not only see that Lustig has captured images of the more “stereotypical”, vast landscapes, but he has also captured images of more condensed landscapes that focus on certain aspects which can be found in the vastness of the location previously displayed (for example, a singular tree, or a pile of branches, etc.) – these condensed photographs are not only distinguishable from the vast landscape images through their subject matter, but they are also noticeably different through their chosen layout because, as the viewer will see, the images depicting the vast landscapes tend to be printed at a much larger size to those depicting smaller and more specific landscape features
      • The inclusion of these varying types of landscape photographs (vast and condensed) provides the viewer with a greater understanding about the particular “unfamiliar” landscape that has been photographed (the Hackney Marshes) which, along with the text included within the book (discussed in more detail below), allows the viewers to gain a more contextualized understanding of the concept behind the project (the exploration of the wildness associated with this particular place)
  •  Although Lustig has included varying types of landscape photographs within this particular project (including vast and condensed), all of his images have been photographed using a documentarian aesthetic which can be seen through the “straight-forward” composition of the images
    • Within each of the photographs, Lustig also documents the landscapes in relatively mundane and everyday natural conditions (including non-dramatic lighting and weather conditions such as cloudy skies and mist) which, although this can be used to enhance the documentary style of photography, can also be used to suggest the natural “wildness” portrayed by the landscape
    • However, with this being said, Lustig also experimented with capturing his photographs using a slightly more “creative”, lower down perspective (that can be seen through the majority of his images), which provide the viewer with an unusual and sometimes angular perspective on the landscape that they may not have noticed/considered if exploring the location themselves
    • These chosen aesthetic aspects (the natural conditions and the lower perspective) can therefore be used by the viewer to suggest that these particular landscape subjects are those that have simply been observed by the two boys introduced in the main accompanying fictional narrative
      • This idea of the boys observing and exploring the “wildness” of the landscape can also be enhanced through the inclusion of photographs that elicit a slightly more voyeuristic feel to the images through the obvious “peering” through tangled branches in order to focus on a particular landscape aspect – these specific voyeuristic photographs can also be used by the viewer as a symbolic reference to the age and curious stage of life that the fictional characters are most likely experiencing at the time of this documentation

 

The Photo Book:

 

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Please note, for this particular section of research regarding “The Marshes” photobook, I have decided to spend my time focusing on the more unique aspects of the book (such as included pamphlets) as well as any features that I feel will be relevant for my FMP, rather than the more specific layouts of the book (for example, where the photographs are situated on the page). With this being said, if I later decide to create a book for my FMP exhibition piece, I plan on revisiting my gained knowledge from this particular example by Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig.

 

  • This book is from a collection of 300 limited edition, hand-made books which, through it’s manufacturing and known uniqueness and specialty, not only heightens the permanence of the collection, but also enhances the personal importance of the collection and the artifact
  • Looking primarily at the stories included in “The Marshes” photobook, that have been written by Samuel Wright, as suggested in the review by Josh Loeb, Wright’s stories are: “tender and allusive, with the merest hint of the sinister” – however, as the viewer progresses through the reading of the book (and as suggested previously), this book includes two types of writing in the form of a main story and four short stories
  • In relation to the main story, “Best Friends”, this narrative has been written in a simple and sometimes poetic style that mainly focuses on the actions and dialogs between two young boys that are exploring the wildness of the Hackney Marshes (as briefly referenced above)
    • Looking at the simple aspects that have been included within this long piece of text (including the use of simple sentences and mere depictions of the dialog between the two boys), this style can clearly be used by the reader to reflect and reference the age of maturity of the two main characters
    • As for the more poetic aspects that have also been included in this particular text (including the use of metaphors and descriptive language to describe the boys actions and what they see, etc.), this can be used by the reader to suggest the childlike imagination that the boys would be experiencing at the young age documented within the narrative
    • Both of these textual styles (simple and poetic) therefore enhance the main concept of the story surrounding the boys adventures through the marshes, whilst also providing the viewer with text that has specifically been written in this manner in order to challenge the fictitiousness associated with the writing – what I mean by this is that the style of text has been carefully considered so that the viewer begins to question the fictitious aspect of the story through the fact that it appears to suggest a slightly modified documentation of a real event
  • With regards to the inclusion of the four other short stories throughout the main narrative, these particular sections have been clearly highlighted through the fact that they are displayed within smaller, thinner pamphlets throughout the book – this provides the viewer with a visual clue as to the fact that they are not actually a part of the main story
    • However, with this being said, the positioning of these short stories throughout the book can actually be used by the viewer to suggest that the short stories are still associated with ideas discussed in this section of the main story (as well as the fact that they are obviously related to the overarching theme of “wildness”)
    • These particular short stories have also been written in a differing style to the main “Best Friend” narrative included within the book
      • These short stories depict personal accounts that Wright experienced in the Hackney marshes, and they have therefore been written in a much more personal and poetic manner which elicits a similar sense to that associated with a diary
      • This varied style obviously provides the viewer with further evidence that these stories are not actually a part of the main narrative, and is simply a short story that has also been included
    • This personal documentation and style of writing (in conjunction with it’s inclusion in the main text) enhances the idea discussed above that the viewers may have begun to question the fictitiousness of the narrative – this is because the viewers can use these personal short stories as clues to suggest that the main text is in fact a revisited documentation of “real” past events and that the narratives included within this book have simply been branded as fictitious as Wright wanted to detach himself from the events discussed within the story
  • Now, looking back at the accompanying text (the main narrative and the short stories), although they incorporate a range of writing styles, this text has obviously been included within the book as a way of contextualizing the photographs, allowing the viewer to gain a greater understanding of the images through providing them with a visual reference to ideas discussed within the fictional stories

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • By looking at “The Marshes” by Samuel Wright and Josh Lustig, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP in a number of different ways, including the landscape image aesthetics and the use of accompanying text
  • As suggested above, Matt Johnston wanted me to research into the concept behind this particular piece as he thought that it related to my FMP – on reflection, I soon realized that it could easily be associated to my FMP,
  • As suggested above, after looking into the concept surrounding this photobook, I soon realized that Matt Johnston suggested I research this particular section of the publication (it’s concept) as it can relate to my FMP through the fact that it photographically and textually explores a particular landscape – within my FMP, I am photographically “exploring” or documenting the Lake District, and can use text to further evidence the methodology and concept behind my project
  • In relation to the photographs taken by Lustig, as previously stated, Lustig uses a documentary aesthetic when capturing his landscape photographs which has provided me with another form of visual example that I can aim to achieve throughout the creation of my own landscape images because, as stated before, I want to create a piece of work that differs from the stereotypical representations of landscape (either through the experimentation of different creative techniques or more documentarian style photography) in order to reflect the personal aspect of the project: it is not a conventional project, but a personal one
  • Lustig’s inclusion of varying photographic landscape styles (including vast and condensed landscapes) to enhance the concept of the project (and therefore the audiences understanding) has also provided me with another form of inspiration because, as suggested in each of my proposals (please see in my please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”), I am planning on collecting natural materials whilst conducting my FMP (which could act as the “condensed landscape”) and could later experiment with the inclusion of these aspects in order to see if they enhance the narrative of my project
  • As also discussed above, Lustig carefully considered the aesthetics of his images (including the composition, perspective, natural conditions, lighting, etc.) in order to symbolize some of the fictional concepts provided by the accompanying text – I could therefore apply this particular technique to my FMP as I could consider the technical elements of my photographs in order to represent the overall feel of the memory that I associate with the landscape
  • Finally, in relation to Wright’s written work, by looking at “The Marshes”, I have not only gained knowledge surrounding the importance of accompanying pieces of text in order to provide the viewer with a contextualized understanding of the project they are witnessing, but I have also gained an understanding regarding the importance of choosing the appropriate style of writing in order to reflect and represent the concept or narrative discussed throughout the project
    • Please note, I will be conducting more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects through the use of textual techniques, which can be found under the “Text” section of this blog post)

 


 

Camera Work” by Alfred Stieglitz (introduced to within the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post)

Please note, as briefly suggested above, in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post, whilst reading “Landscape as Photograph” by Estelle Jussim and Elizabeth Lindquist-Cock, I was introduced to a collection of magazines called “Camera Work” (that were edited by Alfred Stieglitz), which I thought may be beneficial for me to research into for my FMP. After deciding this, I then conducted some brief research into the magazines and soon came across a book called “Camera Work: The Complete Photographs” that offered a selection of the works that Stieglitz included within a variety of his magazines. For this particular piece of research, I therefore plan on spending time reflecting on the generalized aesthetics of the images included within this book, before discussing how this could apply to my FMP.

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  • As suggested above, “Camera Work: The Complete Photographs” includes a collection of images that have been taken from Stieglitz’s 50 issues of the “Camera Work” journal
  • Skimming through this book, it is clear to see that all of the images within this particular collection would be categorized under Pictorial Photography – as I’m sure you are aware, Pictorialism was an aesthetic movement within photography (that occurred around the 19th and early 20th century) and refers to a style in which the photographer has manipulated the photograph to “create” an image (rather than to, simply, document a subject)
  • Looking through this particular collection of photographs, I am going to be focusing primarily on the range of landscape photographs included within this book (although, please note, most of what I am about to analyze and reflect upon can also reference the portraits included within this collection)
    • In relation to the composition and perspective of the images, it is obviously hard to pinpoint a singular technique, as all of these images are from different photographers – however, looking through the book, it is clear to see that the composition has been experimented with, before being carefully considered, to not only enhance the “created” and manipulated ideology associated with Pictorialism, but to also enhance the portrayal of the concept captured within the photograph
    • With regards to the lighting of the images, again, it is very difficult to find a generalized technique throughout the variety of photographers work, but, with this being said, when looking through the book it is clear to see that many photographers have spent time experimenting with the exposure (as well as dodging and burning techniques) within their images
      • As you will see from the images included above, many of the images within the book appear to be slightly underexposed in order to elicit a more dramatic and eerie atmosphere, whereas others are considerably overexposed, portraying a more pure and angelic emotional association – both of these techniques therefore help in the viewers reading of the image as they can begin to associate the concept or narrative portrayed in these images with the emotional state that they elicit
      • In regards to the dodging and burning techniques, looking through this book, this form of manipulation has been embraced by the Pictorialist photographers in order to enhance certain aspect within their photographs, which allows the viewers to focus their attention on the features that the photographers chose
    • As you will also see from the images above, Pictorialist photographs tend to lack sharp focus (some more than others), which was an aesthetic technique used by photographers in order to clearly define their photography within the Pictorialism movement
      • However, with this being said, the lack of focus within the images have also been used in order to enhance the concept and narrative depicted by the photograph, and it has often been said that this particular aesthetic technique creates an image that elicits a great sense of emotion, whilst also symbolizing the creative ideology of an individual’s imagination – this is because this aesthetic technique obviously creates a clearly unfocused and faded image, which can be used by the viewer to represent the photographer’s imagination (the imagination has been represented with a faded aesthetic because imagination is subjective, meaning that the viewer would not be able to gain a clear understanding of the photographer’s imagination, and therefore the photographer’s complete intention with regards to the creation of this image)
    • Also, in relation to the colour of the images, as you will see, most of these images have been manipulated from black and white, in order to create images with a mainly brown (or blue) tint – this technique was employed by the photographers as another way of manipulating their images into the clearly defined realm of Pictorialsm
      • However, once again, looking at the examples used throughout the book, the photographers clearly took time in considering which colour to use in order to enhance the narrative of the image they have created
      • In relation to the landscape images in particular, most of the photographers have chosen a brown colouration, which has been used to enhance one of the landscapes natural pigments, making it appear slightly more realistic and relatable to the documented landscape (in comparison to a black and white image or a the use of a manipulated blue tint)
    • Finally, each of these particular aesthetics (the lighting, focus and colour) all add an aged sense to the images (as they can all be clearly defined as Pictorialst, which is associated with the 19th and early 20th centuries), whilst being used by the photographers as a way of eliciting and emotional intent into the viewers imagination

 

FMP Inspiration

  • By looking at the book “Camera Work: The Complete Photographs”, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP by gaining an understanding of the aesthetics included within Pictorial Photography which I could possibly use within the creation of my own images
  • The first piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from this particular book, is the idea of carefully considering the composition of the images in order to enhance the photographs concept
    • I could use this particular considered, compositional technique within my FMP landscape images in order to elicit the idea of returning to particular places in the lake district to help in the recollection of my personal memories
  •  Another piece of inspiration that I will be taking away from this book is the use of lighting in order to represent the narrative portrayed within the photograph
    • I could use this manipulation of light within my FMP in order to enhance the idea of the emotion that I associate with the particular memory I recall (for example, using darkened light to represent a more upsetting memory)
  •  However, the main piece of inspiration that I will be applying to my FMP is the use of a lack of sharp focus within the images
    • Although, as suggested above, I said that this could represent the imagination of the photographer, in relation to my FMP, I feel that this aesthetic technique could be used to represent the fading of my personal memories that I am trying to recollect through the revisiting of these particular places (I am therefore planning on experimenting with this particular technique throughout the developmental process of my FMP)
  •  Finally, the last bit of inspiration I will be taking away from this section of research is the use of a manipulated colouration of the images in order to enhance the age of the photograph
    • This is because, as it enhances the age elicited by the image, this technique could also, therefore, be used to represent something in the past which could be used within my FMP as a symbolic photographic reference to the past events I experienced with my Grandpa that are now stored within my fading memories (once again, I am therefore planning on experimenting with this particular technique throughout the developmental process of my FMP)

 


 

Roaming” by Todd Hido (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th October 2014), he suggested that I look at the Todd Hido’s “Roaming”

  • After the discussions that we had in this one-to-one session, I knew that Matt Johnston mainly wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to the aesthetics that Hido creates throughout this project
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore decided to conduct some brief research into his methodology of creation (in case I wish to try and recreate it for an experimental aspect within my FMP development) which can be found below in the format of an interview with Aaron Schuman for “Seesaw” Magazine
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include research that reflects on Hido’s methodology, as well as the aesthetics of his images, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (all of which can be found below):

 

http://seesawmagazine.com/roaming_pages/roaming_interview.html

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The Methodology:

  • When reading through this interview with Todd Hido (taken by Aaron Schuman), I was able to gain insight into the technique that Hido used in the creation of his “Roaming” photographs
  • Opening up that the project’s technique actually started accidentally, Hido explained that his images for this particular collection have been shot through a car window that was usually tinted with water and dirt in order to create an expressive landscape photograph
  • Reading this particular interview the discussed the methodology employed throughout Todd Hido’s “Roaming” work, has obviously allowed me to gain the relevant information that is required for me to experiment with the recreation of this technique throughout the development of my FMP

 

The Photographs:

  • In relation to the photographs included within Todd Hido’s “Roaming” collection, as suggested in the interview with Aaron Schuman, this particular series differs from the “classical” category of landscape photography and instead shows inspiration from both Pictorialist and Expressionist movements
  • After gaining information regarding the methodology behind the creation of his work, (as well as the aesthetics he has chosen to use throughout his images, discussed below) it is clear to see that this particular series mainly focuses on the concept of a “Journey”
  • Looking at the perspective throughout Hido’s images, (and as suggested in the interview with Schuman), Hido is often attracted to landscapes that offer a great sense of perspective and usually documents roads and pathways that stretch deep into the distance
    • This particular perspective provides the viewer with compositional leading lines, allowing them to feel as though they are being drawn into the photograph, which, along with the documentation of the road/path, provides the viewer with a connective association between Hido’s images and the main “Journey” concept of the collection
  • In relation to the composition of Hido’s images, as you will see from the examples above, most of his images incorporate a casual composition that embraces the use of a tilted frame
    • These compositional elements result in the creation of landscape images that appear to reference that of a snapshot aesthetic which, in conjunction with the perspective incorporated in the images (discussed above), as well as the methodology of the projects creation, further enhances this idea of “journeying” towards a particular destination – this is because it can be used to suggest that these images were simply quick snapshots of expressive landscapes that Hido experienced on his way to a different destination
  • When looking through this collection of images, the viewer will notice that Hido has included both coloured and black and white images
    • In relation to Hido’s choices about having some images in colour and others in black and white, I personally feel that he has simply decided on the colouration of the photographs depending on the colour that was captured within these documented landscapes
      • What I mean by this is that, by looking through the images, the photographs that have been included in colour offer incredibly dramatic (yet natural) colours (which would have clearly been lost in a black and white image), whereas the black and white photographs appear to be the more simple landscape images that look like they didn’t incorporate a variety of interesting colours
      • Also, the decision as to the colouration of the photographs have clearly not only been chosen through the aesthetic characteristics that they may create, but have also been chosen through the fact that they enhance a particular atmospheric feel that is associated with the image
    • Now, although the use of both colour and black and white images within a collection often creates an inconsistency within the series, affecting the flow and reading of the images, Hido has managed to maintain the consistency of his “Roaming” project through the constant use of other aesthetic techniques, as well as making sure his images still portray the same concept of “journeying”
  • In relation to the natural conditions that Hido uses throughout his series, as you can see, Hido tended to capture his images in more dramatic weather (including rain, snow and fog) whilst also experimenting with varying light (including diffused light, backlight, and shooting straight into the light)
    • With regard to the dramatic weather conditions he captured within his photographs, this not only allowed him to create images that elicited an eerie and moody atmosphere, but this also enhanced the projects methodology and concept of “journeying” – this is because it is not the stereotypical weather depicted in landscape photographs, and viewers wouldn’t therefore expect landscape photographers to be walking out in this particular weather (referencing the use of a car within this projects methodology whilst also hinting at the concept of “journeying”)
    • However, looking at the lighting that he has incorporated within his images, Hido tended to use diffused light in order to enhance the creative methodology he employed throughout the creation of his image (rather than including dramatic light that could distract from his technique), as well as backlighting and shooting straight into the sun in order to adapt the atmospheric appeal of the images (either creating more dramatic and eerie photographs or angelic and ethereal images)
  • Finally, looking into the expressive distortions that Hido used throughout his collection (the rain on the wind-shield and the long hand-held exposures), as suggested above, these can be used by the viewer as a representation of the overarching theme of “journeying” through the practical methodology and snapshot aesthetics used
    • However, looking into the symbolic representation that these particular techniques create, in association with the aesthetic features discussed above (including perspective, composition, colour, and natural conditions), this particular methodology has resulted in the creation of images that not only depict the physical act of “journeying”, but also the emotions attached with it – this is due to the fact that these images present a voyeuristic approach of peering into the distance through a barrier of water (that can be used to symbolize tears and sadness), enhancing the collections ability to elicit an emotional moodiness and sense of longing, which further provides the viewer with the conclusion that these images suggest places that hold an personal emotional connection

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • By looking at Todd Hido’s “Roaming”, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP by gaining an understanding of the creative aesthetics he employed which I could possibly use within the creation of my own images
  • The main piece of inspiration that I have gained from Todd Hido’s work is his particular use of expressive distortions in order to create images with a unique aesthetic that enhances the concept of his project – although as previously suggested, this particular technique was employed by Hido in order to symbolize the concept of a “journey” as well as it’s emotional attachments associated with the place, I personally feel that I could adapt the use of this technique within my FMP in order to represent the fading memories that have tinted the landscape I am documenting throughout my project
    • As suggested above, understanding the methodology behind Todd Hido’s work has therefore allowed me to gain the relevant information that is required for me to experiment with the recreation of this technique throughout the developmental stages of my FMP (which I am now planning to do)
  • Finally, another piece of inspiration that I have gained from Todd Hido’s work is the incorporation of a variety of different aesthetic techniques (including perspective, composition, colour, natural conditions, and lighting), not only to enhance the main theme behind the project, but to also symbolize the emotional aspects associated with the particular theme explored – I could therefore use this within my FMP as a way of carefully considering the aesthetics of my landscape images to highlight the idea of returning to a particular place in order to recollect personal memories, whilst also using the aesthetics to further symbolize the emotions associated with the particular memory I have recalled
    • An example of some of the main aesthetic elements that I feel I could relate to my FMP include:
      • The use of composition and perspective to suggest traveling to a particular destination – I could apply different compositional techniques to my FMP in order to symbolize the idea that, whilst visiting these different locations within the Lake District, they are triggering my psychological journey to the memories of my Grandpa
      • The use of natural conditions and lighting in order to represent the narrative portrayed within the photograph – I could use natural conditions and the manipulation of light within my FMP in order to symbolize the emotion that I associate with the particular memory I recall (for example, the use of darkened light to represent a more upsetting memory)

 


 

Impressions” by Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson (found when looking into Joe Cornish’s work in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Location Research” blog post)

Please note, as briefly suggested above in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Location Research” blog post, looking at the work of Joe Cornish, I was introduced to some of Cornish’s gallery tenants that included both Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson (who work together as collaborative landscape photographers). Whilst viewing their work, I soon noticed that they created representations of landscapes by focusing on pictorial, painterly and abstract techniques, and so, due to the relevance that I think it may hold in relation to my FMP, I therefore decided to incorporate their “Impression” projects into my research.

 

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  • http://www.leemingpaterson.com
  • When looking through Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson’s “Impressions” collections, as suggested above, the images included within these series differ from the stereotypical depiction of landscapes and instead represent the land in a pictorial, painterly and abstract way
  • Looking through the images, it is clear to see that Leeming and Paterson adapted their creative techniques in order to create photographic representations of the landscape that differ in the atmosphere they create and emotions they elicit
    • As you will see, these techniques have been carefully considered for each of the landscapes that they photograph, because, due to the fact that their techniques shield the true documentation of the landscape subject, they have employed creative techniques in order to represent certain aspects within the landscape depicted
    • Please note, although I am not 100% sure of the techniques they used to create these images, I have tried to use my photographic knowledge in order to gain an understanding in their methodologies so that I could attempt to recreate them as a part of the development for my FMP
    • As you will see from the images above, one of their simpler techniques is to use mist as an aesthetic tool in order to create and ethereal and dreamlike representation of the landscape they are portraying
    • Another technique (which I think they may have used but am slightly less certain in relation to the other two techniques I have suggested) is the layering of slightly altered landscape images in order to create a more textured representation of the landscape photographed, which can clearly be used by the viewer to symbolically reference the textures experienced in the landscape depicted
    • However, Leeming and Paterson’s main technique is the use of movement during the exposure of the landscape image that they are creating
      • As you will see from the photos included above, this technique has been used in two varying ways:
      • The first is the use of a sideways movement which creates a wave-like affect throughout the images – this obviously elicits a sense of movement within the images, but due to the specific directionality of this technique, it actually creates a softer flow that can be used by the viewer as a symbolic reference to the soft, flowing aspects that individuals may encounter within documented landscape (for example, a gentle wind or a running stream)
      • The second is the use of an up-and-down movement which creates a more jagged affect within the images – similar to the previous movement technique, this obviously elicits movement within the photographs but the specific directionality of this technique actually creates a harsher feel, which can be used by the viewer as a symbolic reference to the harsh aspects included within this particular landscape (for example, vibrant, contrasting colours or harsh weather conditions such as snow)
  •  Looking at the colour of the landscape images included within this collection, similar to the creative techniques that Leeming and Paterson used, these have been carefully considered (and in some cases slightly manipulated), in order to enhance aspects of the landscape that have been representationally portrayed in the photograph
    • For example, some of the colours appear more vibrant and dramatic whereas others appear a lot softer and have much subtler tones – this can be used by the viewer to suggest the time of year or the weather within this particular landscape, and can therefore symbolize the emotion associated with this landscape at this particular moment in time
  • In relation to the natural conditions (including weather and lighting) which have been captured within these landscape photographs, as the viewer will see, due to the creative and abstract techniques used, it is relatively difficult to determine the actual reality of the weather (apart from the mist that has been used as a creative tool) and lighting that was used when the landscape was documented – however, as the viewer continues through the reading of the images in this series, they begin to notice clues within the colouration of the images as to the weather and the lighting, which, as suggested above, can be used by the viewer to suggest the time of year or the weather within this particular landscape, and can therefore symbolize the emotion associated with this landscape at this particular moment in time
  •  However, in relation to the composition and perspective of each of their landscape photographs, although, as discussed above Leeming and Paterson clearly experiment with more creative techniques through other aesthetic aspects within their images, these particular features of their photographs seem to follow the classical “rules” of landscape photography including the use of the rule of thirds
    • The “classical” techniques have therefore been incorporated into their images in order to act as a compositional tool, which provides the viewer with a visual clue suggesting that these pictorial, painterly and abstract images are actually a more creative and representative documentation of landscape photographs
  • Finally, looking into the symbolic representations of these carefully considered aesthetic features, as the viewer will be able to see, each of these images elicit a dreamlike atmosphere which varies in intensity and meaning through the technicality of the creative aspect used
    • What I mean by this is that, as suggested above, the use of techniques varied (from the simple use of mist as an aesthetic feature, the possible layering of images, as well as the sideways and up-and-down movement of the camera through the exposure of the image), which either created a softer or harsher atmosphere elicited by the photograph – the softer creative techniques (including the mist and the sideways movement) can therefore be used by the viewer to suggest that this dreamlike state is associated with positive emotions, whereas the harsher techniques (including the possible layering of images and the up-and-down movement) can be used by the viewer to suggest that of a nightmare which is obviously associated to more negative emotions and feelings

 

FMP Inspiration

  • Very similar to Todd Hido’s “Roaming” work, by looking at the Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson’s “Impressions” projects, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP by gaining an understanding of the creative aesthetics they employed which I could possibly use within the creation of my own images
  • The main piece of inspiration that I have gained from Leeming and Paterson’s work is their particular use of creative techniques in order to create images with a unique and dreamlike aesthetic that can be associated with the landscape
    • Although as previously suggested, this particular technique was employed by Leeming and Paterson in order to symbolize the features within the landscape, as well as it’s emotional and dreamlike attachments associated with the place, I personally feel that I could adapt the use of this technique within my FMP in order to represent the fading memories that have tinted the landscape that I now experience (this therefore means that, through trying to gain an understanding of the methodology employed by Leeming and Paterson, I have been able to provide myself with information that is required for me to experiment with the recreation of this technique throughout the development of my FMP – which I am now planning on doing)
  •  Finally (again, very similar to Hido’s work) another piece of inspiration that I have gained from Leeming and Paterson’s work is the incorporation of a variety of different aesthetic techniques (mainly including colour, as the natural conditions and lighting are nearly indistinguishable and so are represented through the colours portrayed) to enhance the physical aspects of the landscape, as well as symbolizing the emotional and dreamlike aspects associated with this particular place
    • I could therefore employ this technique within my FMP as a way of using the aesthetics of my landscape images to symbolize the emotions associated with the particular memory I have recalled

 


 

Reconstructing The View” by Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014 and in the one-to-one tutorial with David Moore on 21st January 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th October 2014), as well as a one-to-one session I had with David Moore (on 21st January 2015), they both suggested that I look at Mark Klett and Bryon Wolfe’s “Reconstructing the View”

  • After the discussions that I had in each of the one-to-one sessions, I knew that both Matt Johnston and David Moore mainly wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to the concept behind the project, as well as the technical, aesthetic techniques employed by Klett and Wolfe
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore decided to conduct some brief research into the concept behind the creation of the project, which can be found below in the format of an Amazon book description
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include research that reflects on the concept surrounding the project, as well as the (technical) aesthetics of their images, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

Please note, although this particular piece of work is displayed as a photobook (which I was unable to attain in a video format, hence the inclusion of photographs instead), as suggested above, I have decided that for this section of my research, I will spend time focusing mainly on the photographs aesthetics rather than the layout of the publication.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Reconstructing-View-Grand-Canyon-Photographs/dp/0520273907

 

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The Concept:

  • After reading through the “Reconstructing the View” book description that can be found on Amazon, this provided me with information regarding the concept behind this particular project by Mark Klett and Bryon Wolfe
  • “Reconstructing the View” is a project by Klett and Wolfe that uses landscape photography to reflect on broader themes, such as “culture”, “the passage of time”, and “the construction of perception”, through the exploration of the Grand Canyon
  • Within this particular project, Klett and Wolfe used a “Rephotography” practice where they identified sites of historic photographs and made new images to those precise locations – the particular images that they used as a historical reference ranged in type and style and included historical photographs and drawings, photographs by well-known photographs (such as Edward Weston and Ansel Adams), souvenir postcards, and images from Flickr
  • Klett and Wolfe then used digital post-production to create a singular photographic document that incorporated both the found images and photographs of their own
  • After reading this particular Amazon book description that discussed the concept behind the creation of the project, I now understand why both Matt Johnston and David Moore suggested I look at it as a part of my research
    • For my FMP I am planning on using some of my Grandpa’s old photographs (in some way or another), in order to enhance the fact that he was the inspiration behind my passion for landscape photography within the Lake District – looking at this particular project by Klett and Wolfe, I could therefore experiment with this technique in order to see if the inclusion of my Grandpa’s images would enhance the reconnecting aspect of the project

 

The Photographs:

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  • In relation to the photographs included in this particular project by Klett and Wolfe, as suggested above, they are digital montages that have been created to include historical, found images, alongside their own photographs
    • This has resulted in the creation of large, almost panoramic images, which can not only be used by the viewer to suggest the vastness of the Grand Canyon subject, but could also symbolize the large pool of photographs that Klett and Wolfe searched through throughout the process of completing this particular project
  • As also discussed above, the found photographs (that have been chosen to be used as inspiration for the creation of Klett and Wolfe’s montages) vary in age and type, which provides the viewer with a greater contextual understanding regarding the themes of “culture”, “the passage of time”, and “the construction of perception” (that is suggested throughout this collection) – this is because the viewer is able to compare the similarities and differences between the found and created photographs (including when the were taken and the culture depicted in the image), which allows them to challenge any preconceived perception they may have had regarding this particular location and it’s history
    • This idea of “constructing perception” is also greatly enhanced through the physical creation of the output, as the viewer can clearly see that the image has been constructed in order to include two different types of perception regarding the same landscape
  • In relation to the composition and perspective of the images, although these are primarily determined by the found photographs that they wish to include, Klett and Wolfe also carefully considered the composition of the created montage in order to enhance, or slightly adjust, the narrative associated with the found photograph – what I mean by this is that Klett and Wolfe deliberately choose the location of the found photograph, in relation to the images that they created, in order to include more or less of the Grand Canyon landscape, to provide the viewer with more visual information that they can use to create an enhanced narrative related to the found image
    • Also, looking at the positioning of these found images, as you can see, they have been included in the montage to best fit in with the surrounding landscape, which often means that they appear slightly angled – this simply adds to the “constructive” concept related to this project as it enhances the methodology employed by both Klett and Wolfe at the time of production
  • Looking at the colour of the images included within this particular project, as the viewer can see, both the montages and the found images tend to vary between colour and black and white
    • As previously discussed within my research, colour is usually used within landscape photography in order to enhance the realistic representation of the land that is being depicted, whereas black and white landscape photographs are usually used in order to enhance the textural aspect of the landscape (whilst also being used as a tool to adapt the atmosphere elicited by the photograph) – as for the choice as to whether the montage was to be in colour or black and white, I personally feel that this decision was made based on the subject of the found image; this is because, as you can see, the montages that include found images that simply depict (textual aspects of) the landscape are usually seen in black and white (in order to enhance the texture), whereas the montages that include found photographs of people are usually seen in colour (in order to enhance a realistic representation of the person and the landscape)
    • As you will see from the selection of images above, most of the found images that have been incorporated into the montage are usually of a different colouration to the created image in order to enhance the differences witnessed in the found and created photographs (including the date it was taken, changes in culture, etc.)
    • However, there are some occasions throughout this collection where the found image and the digitally created montage are the same colour, which can be used to suggest that there are more similarities between the found and the created image than there are differences
  • Finally, in relation to the natural conditions (including weather and lighting) displayed within these montages, as the viewer looks through this collection they begin to notice that, on most occasions, Klett and Wolfe tend to try and match the natural conditions to those captured within the found photograph – this is because it enhances the idea that these very different images (the found and the created) are a documentation of the same place
    • However, with this being said, as briefly referenced above, some of the montages within this collection vary in the natural conditions they depict in comparison to the conditions included within the found photograph – this obviously enhances the difference between the found image and the created montage, which allows the viewer to further understand the “passage of time” concept associated with this project

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • By looking at Mark Klett and Bryon Wolfe’s “Reconstructing the View” project, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP by gaining an understanding of the creative aesthetics they employed which I could possibly use within the creation of my own images
    • As suggested above, the main piece of inspiration that I will be taking away from this particular section of my research is the creative methodology that they employed (using found images and including them in a digital montage alongside some of their own photographs) in order to represent the concept of “the passage of time” throughout their project – for my FMP I am planning on using some of my Grandpa’s old photographs (in some way or another), in order to enhance the fact that he was the inspiration behind my passion for landscape photography within the Lake District and, by looking at this particular project by Klett and Wolfe, I could therefore experiment with this technique in order to see if the inclusion of my Grandpa’s images would enhance the reconnecting aspect of the project (which I am now planning on doing)
      • Please note, when experimenting with this particular creative technique, I will also obviously consider the more specific aspects that I have reflected upon that can be found throughout this project, including the use of composition to enhance the narrative associated with the found photograph, as well as the capturing of similar and differing natural conditions, for example

 


 

Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroid’s” by Andrey A. Tarkovsky (suggested in the group tutorial with Emma Critchley on the 28th January 2014)

In a group tutorial that I had with Emma Critchley (on the 28th January 2015), she suggested that I look at Andrey A. Tarkovsky’s “Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroid’s”

  • After the discussion that we had in the group tutorial, I knew that Emma Critchley mainly wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to the fact that I was using polaroid’s within my FMP to document the methodology I underwent throughout the module
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research into the aesthetics and concept of the use of polaroid’s, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (all of which can be found below): 

Please note, although this particular piece of work is displayed as a photobook, as suggested above, I have decided that for this section of my research, I will spend time focusing mainly on the photographs as a series rather than the layout of the publication.

 

 

  • During the group tutorial that I had with Emma Critchley, as she suggested I research into the work of Tarkovsky, she also gave me some brief background information regarding this particular project – she told me that Tarkovsky was a film maker and that this book could be seen as a precursor to some of his films through the inclusion of polaroid’s that could be used to represent some of the Stills from his films
  • When looking through this particular collection, the viewer notices that Tarkovsky’s polaroid’s include a wide range of photographic subjects that vary from landscapes and urbanscapes to still-lives and portraits
    • The inclusion of these varying types of photographs can therefore be used by the viewer to gain a greater understanding regarding the creation of this project, and, as suggested by Emma Critchley, can also be used by the viewer to suggest that these are in fact Stills from some of the films that he had created
  • This idea of the polaroid’s acting like Stills from some of his films can be further enhanced through the decisive use of polaroid’s (rather then simply photographs) to capture these particular scenes – this is because polaroid’s are usually associated with the snapshot style of photography which, in relation to this particular project, can be used by the viewer to suggest that these polaroid’s have been “quickly” created as storyboard tools in the pre-production stages of some of his films
  • However, although this snapshot aesthetic, that is associated with the use of polaroid’s, can be used to further enhance this idea of depicting storyboard stills from some of his photographs, as the viewer looks at each of the images, they can easily see that the photograph has been carefully considered in terms of it’s composition, perspective, natural conditions and lighting – now, although this can be used as an argument against this idea of the snapshot, the use of these carefully controlled technical and aesthetic aspects of the image, along with the vibrancy of the colour captured within the photographs, combine to create an incredibly cinematic array of images that can further emphasize these polaroid’s relationship with the films that Tarkovsky created

 

FMP Inspiration

  • Now, although I feel like I could include more information regarding the specific use of some of the aesthetic aspects within the polaroid’s (such as the composition, perspective, natural conditions and lighting), after conducting this brief research into Andrey A. Tarkovsky’s “Instant Light Tarkovsky Polaroid’s” collection, I feel that I have gained the main piece of inspiration that I was looking for in relation to the use of polaroid’s within a photographic project
  • As discussed above, Tarkovsky’s polaroid’s have created a photographic project that can be used by the viewer to suggest the documentation of storyboard images that Tarkovsky considered throughout the pre-production stages of some of his films
    • This therefore relates to my FMP because, as previously suggested, I am using polaroid’s to document the methodology (or “pre-production”) behind my project, as a type of experimentation, to see if it enhances the concept and reconnecting aspect of the project
    • This project by Tarkovsky has therefore provided me with inspiration in terms of the aesthetics of polaroid images and has suggested that, although polaroid’s are associated with the snapshot aesthetic, they can also capture carefully considered images that are aesthetically beautiful

 


 

Richard Long (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with David Rule on the 11th February 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with David Rule (on 11th February 2015), he suggested that I look at the work of Richard Long

  • Now, although after the discussions I knew that he mainly wanted me to look at Richard Long’s work in relation to the “Land Art Movement” he was a part of (which I have previously researched, please see under “Research into the Land Art Movement” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post) as well as his use of text in his final outputs (which has still been included below under the “Text” section of this blog post), as I was looking into his images, I notice a very specific compositional methodology that he employed which I thought may be relevant to include within the development for my FMP
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research that reflects on the aesthetics of these particular images, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

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  • As suggested above, when looking through Richard Long’s images I noticed a very specific compositional methodology that I thought could be interesting to experiment with throughout the development of my FMP
  • Similar to the work of both John Gossage and Paul Gaffney (researched within the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Photographic Research” blog post), Long often employs the use of a “middle-of-the-road” aesthetic
    • Now, although this compositional methodology has primarily been used by Long as a way of documenting the piece of land art that he has created, (similar to both Gossage and Gaffney’s projects) the compositional structure of these images (including the use of leading lines), can be used by the viewer to symbolize the idea of travelling towards a particular destination, which can therefore be used to enhance the “Art of Walking” methodology employed by Long in the creation of his land art pieces (also discussed in previous research)
    • Also, similar to Gossage, the horizontal composition throughout these particular images vary (showing more or less of the foreground land situated ahead), which has usually been used by Long in order o enhance the importance of the ground photographed and therefore the piece of land art that he created (through including more of the land within the image)
      • However, within his collection of images that support this particular compositional methodology, there are also some photographs that have been equally split in half in terms of the foreground and the impressive landscape background – this particular technique can therefore be used by the viewer to suggest a balance between the simple path that Long has created, and the impressively beautiful landscape included in the background, thus enhancing the impressiveness and beauty of his created land art piece

 

FMP Inspiration

  • Once again, similar to Tarkovsky’s work (that I researched above), although I feel like I could include more information regarding the specific use of some of the aesthetic aspects within the Long’s images (such as the composition, perspective, natural conditions and lighting), after conducting this brief research into the “middle-of-the-road” composition employed by Richard Long, I feel that I have gained the main piece of inspiration that I was looking for in relation to the use of this particular compositional methodology
  • As suggested above (similar to both Gossage and Gaffney), Long used a “middle-of-the-road” composition within his landscape path photographs, which can be used by the viewer to suggest the travelling towards a particular destination
    • I could therefore apply this particular compositional methodology to my FMP as I could use it to symbolize this idea that, whilst visiting these different locations within the Lake District, they are triggering my psychological journey to the memories of my Grandpa
  •  However, as also discussed above, a slightly smaller piece of inspiration that I will also be considering in relation to this composition element, is Long’s use of an equally divided image in order to create balance between the path and the landscape
    • I could use this particular compositional element within my FMP in order to suggest that, although it is the landscapes that trigger the personal memories of my Grandpa, the paths that we walked on are just as important as, without these, the memory wouldn’t have been created (I am therefore planning on experimenting with these particular compositional techniques throughout the developmental process of my FMP)

 


 

It For Others” by Duncan Campbell (suggested in Formative Feedback Session by Anthony Luvera on 4th March 2015)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IpQv2SFA0A

In the Formative Feedback Session that I had with Anthony Luvera (and the rest of the class) (on the 4th March 2015), he suggested that I look at the work of Duncan Campbell’s “It For Others”

  • Within this session, Anthony suggested that I should look at this particular film that explored the documentation of still-life objects (as well as other features), after discussing my ideas of collecting natural materials from the significant locations I am documenting throughout my FMP (which I proposed in each of my proposals–please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”)
  • After conducting some brief research into this particular film by Duncan Campbell (that won him the Turner Prize in 2014), after skimming through this 54 minute video, I soon realized that there were only a couple of sections within the video that I thought were relevant to my FMP
  • I therefore decided to try and find an alternative resource that discussed these particular sections, and soon came across a video (that was recorded by the Tate, which has been embedded below), which not only discussed the sections of the film that were relevant to my FMP, but also discussed the concept behind the project
  • Below you will therefore be able to find research that discusses the concept of the project (which was mainly taken from the video by the Tate), followed by a reflection on specific sections of the films that are relatable to my project, and how this research will be used for inspiration within my FMP:

 

The Concept:

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1&isUI=1

  • After watching this particular video created by the Tate in order to discuss the concept behind the winning project of the Turner Prize in 2014, Campbell suggested that this essay film was very open-ended and discussed ideas about objects and how you can understand certain histories through different objects – this particular ideology therefore relates to my FMP, as not only am I using found images from my Grandpa throughout the development of my FMP in order to gain an understanding of the history and memories associated with them, but as previously stated, I am also collecting pieces of materials from the locations in the Lake District that I can use as a memory trigger for the certain memories I wish to recall
  • Within this documentary film created by the Tate, Campbell suggested that his film was inspired by Chris Marker and Alan Resnais’ 1953 film called “Statues Also Die”, which was about traditional art from West Africa and looked at the relationship between the objects original symbolism of death and its commercialization and consumption by the colonial classes at the time
  • Campbell also discusses the fact that his “It For Others” film is relatively episodic and has been split into sections which are linked through their reference to the ideologies relating to “value”
    • Focusing on the sections of films that discuss the still-lives that are relevant to my FMP, the first part of the film, he suggests, responds to Chris Marker and Alan Resnais’ film and looks into the ideology surrounding replica (African) objects and how these objects still relate to the history of the country even though they have been commercialized
    • Whereas other parts of the film could be seen as opposite to this first section as they explored the idea of advertising objects (in different languages) and how these commodities have been filmed
      • Please note, these two film sections that look at still-life objects have been discussed in more detail below
  •  Campbell then says: “So I’m attracted to certain histories or certain stories, certain individuals” and shares the fact that he often sits through and watches a lot of archival material
    • This can therefore relate to my FMP as, for my project, I am attracted to the personal memories (a “certain history and story”) that I can associate with my Grandpa (the “certain individual”), and have also incorporated the use of archival aspects within my projects development in the form of my Grandpa’s old photographs and materials I have collected through my journeys up to the Lake District (as previously discussed)
  • Towards the end of this particular documentary film by the Tate, Campbell then goes on to say: “You become aware that this isn’t some sort of transparent window onto reality. What’s contained in these archives is actually highly constructed and partial… The histories are very important, but I also think it is very important to look at how those histories are constructed.
    • What this is essentially saying is that the histories explored within these archival materials are constructed and partial, meaning that they do not document the whole of an event and it is only what is captured within the frame, or within the singular object that now represents the entirety of the event
    • This can therefore relate to my FMP because I am obviously looking into the idea of recollecting my personal memories, that incorporate my Grandpa, which have become faded and fragmented over time, creating an altering version of the event in the past

 

The Film:

  • As suggested above, for my research of this particular piece of work, I have decided to simply focus on the sections of the video that look at still-lives of objects as I feel that it is these sections that include a greater relevance to my FMP
  • After watching the documentary video created by the Tate, as stated by Campbell, the first still-life section of the video responds to Chris Marker and Alan Resnais’ film and looks into the ideology surrounding replica (African) objects and how these objects still relate to the history of the country even though they have been commercialized
    • Within this particular section, the main subjects of the video are varying replica objects of African pieces of art that were used in the original 1953 film by Marker and Resnais
    • As the audience watches this particular section, they notice that the aesthetics of the film have been carefully considered to reflect and mirror the techniques used within the original film, in order to provide the audience with a visual clue that references the piece of work that acted as the main inspiration behind this project
      • As you will see, this section has been filmed in black and white (and in front of a black background) – this not only mirrors the colouration of the 1953 film, but (as suggested in previous research) highlights the textures of the object within the frame, creating a more realistic representation of the textural aspect of the object
      • In relation to the lighting of the objects, this too has been kept relatively similar to the original film and, when watching this particular section, there only appears to be one spotlight that has been directed at these objects – now, depending on the positioning of the objects (which does vary, as I will discuss below), this is not only used to enhance the detail and the texture of the object, but is also used to create a abstract documentations of pieces of art, whilst also eliciting a very dramatic and eerie atmosphere, which can be used to reference the nature of the object and the objects association with death
      • As suggested above, the positioning of the objects change in each of the shots (again creating a similarity to the original film) creating a varied composition and perspective (including long-shots, close-ups and angled perspectives) within the frame that creates a more visually interesting flow throughout the section – these positions have been chosen depending on the object being documented in order to produce a shot that encapsulates the object in reality, as well as enhancing more specific aspects of the object
      • In relation to the movement of the camera and the editing of the film in this particular section, as you will see from the video, Campbell has decided to use fast-paced cutting between each of the shots (and in some instances some fast-paced movements), whilst also deliberately capturing “amateur” filming “mistakes” such as jolts of the camera and un-smooth zooming – however, as suggested previously, these have all been deliberately chosen in order to reference the techniques used within the original film in order to enhance the idea that the 1953 film provided Campbell with inspiration for this project
      • Finally, within this section there is no music but a woman narrator that softly describes the histories and concept behind this particular section – this not only references the original film but it provides the audience with a contextual understanding surrounding this particular section, whilst offering the audience with an audible contrast to the “harsh” and darkened atmosphere associated with the objects
  •  The next section of the film that depicts a variety of still-lives, as suggested by Campbell, could be seen as opposite to this first analyzed section as this section explores the idea of advertising objects (in different languages) and how these commodities have been filmed
    • Within this particular section, the main subjects of the video are varying commercial commodities or objects from around the world
    • As the audience watches this particular section, they notice that the aesthetics of the film have been carefully considered in order to represent the commercial aspects of the objects
      • As you will see, this section of the film has been filmed in colour and the objects have been placed (predominantly) in front of a white background – both of these choices not only focus the viewers attention on the object that is being documented, but they are also similar techniques employed by commercial industries to eliminate any distracting features that may take away from their product, whilst also suggesting it’s purity and cleanliness
      • In relation to the lighting of these objects, as the viewer continues through this viewing of this particular section, they notice that they have ben illuminated with a number of different lights in order to bleach out the background whilst also highlighting every aspect of the product (which is, again, another technique associated with commercialism)
      • As for the positioning of these products, they are usually placed within the centre of the frame, but, as the viewer continues through the viewing of this section, they notice that Campbell has experimented with varying positioning’s (and therefore compositions), which adds a certain atmospheric “edge” to the section as it is not how the viewer would expect to see a product displayed in a commercial manner – this therefore keeps the viewer engaged throughout this section by adjusting the flow of the film
      • As for the camera movement, editing, and the use of a female narrator, these aspects remain very similar to those discussed in the previous section
        • However, within this section there is also a portion that moves away from these particular techniques and displays a variety of objects using a very fast-paced cut (with little movement of the camera), to extremely upbeat music – this section can therefore be used to represent the incredibly upbeat and fast-paced environments and countries that are being targeted by the commercialization of the products depicted in the shot, which therefore provides the viewer with an understanding into a symbolic contextualization of the section

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • By looking into Duncan Campbell’s “It For Others” project, I have been able to gain inspiration for my FMP by gaining an understanding of the concept behind the project, as well as the use of aesthetic features within the still-life sections
  • In relation to the concept behind the project, as suggested above, this particular essay film discussed ideas about objects and how you can understand certain histories through different objects
    • This therefore relates to my FMP, as not only am I using found images from my Grandpa throughout the development of my FMP in order to gain an understanding of the history and memories associated with them, but as previously stated, I am also collecting pieces of materials from the locations in the lake district that I can use as a memory trigger for the certain memories I wish to recall
  • I have also gained inspiration from a couple of statements made by Campbell in the interview with the Tate (including “So I’m attracted to certain histories or certain stories, certain individuals…” and “You become aware that this isn’t some sort of transparent window onto reality. What’s contained in these archives is actually highly constructed and partial… The histories are very important, but I also think it is very important to look at how those histories are constructed”)
    • This, as suggested above, relates to my FMP as I am exploring the personal memories (a “certain history and story”) that I can associate with my Grandpa (the “certain individual”), as well as the fact that I am obviously looking into the idea of recollecting my personal memories, that incorporate my Grandpa, which have become faded and fragmented over time, creating an altering version of the event in the past
  • Another piece of inspiration that I have gained from this particular piece of work is the use of a narrator in order to enhance the viewers contextual understanding of the project, increasing their accessibility – similar to the use of text (as described numerous times in previous research) I therefore feel that this has provided me with inspiration that enhances my understanding of the importance of providing either a textual or audible description of the concept behind the project, in order to enhance my projects accessibility
    • Please note, I will be conducting more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects (through the use of textual techniques), (which can be found below under the “Text” section of this blog post)
  • Finally, however, the main piece of inspiration that I have taken away from this particular project, is not only the use of still-life images to document objects that are associated with different history’s or memories (which I am now planning on experimenting with in relation to the collected materials from my trips to the Lake District), but also the use of carefully considered photographic aesthetics in order to represent the concept behind the photographs, providing the viewer with a greater contextualized understanding of the project – I could therefore use this within my FMP as a way of carefully considering the aesthetics of my landscape images to highlight the idea of returning to a particular place in order to recollect personal memories, whilst also using the aesthetics to further symbolize the emotions associated with the particular memory I have recalled

 



 TEXT:

 

Gary Snyder (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th October 2014), he suggested that I read some poems written by Gary Snyder

  • After the discussions that we had in this one-to-one session, I knew that Matt Johnston mainly wanted me to look into these poetic pieces of writing due to the overarching subject that they depict (the land) as well as the idea of using text as a contextualizing tool (especially in conjunction with the stories and memories that I want to portray throughout my FMP)
  • Bearing this in mind, I then did some brief research into some of Snyder’s published books that provided a collected range of poems that he had written over the years, and soon decided to focus my research on his book “Left Out in the Rain”
  • However, as this book contains over 200 poems of his, I decided that to save time with my research, I would read the first poem within every dedicated section (there are 8 in total), and that I would then use these poems to create a generalized reflection and analysis of his works (including the main themes discussed and the style of writing he employed)
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the main themes discussed within these particular poems, as well as some reflections on the style of writing, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Main Themes Discussed:

  • Left Out in the Rain” was inspired by the ancient Chinese proverb, “There’s nothing you can own that can’t be left out in the rain“, and is a collection of poems written by Gary Snyder, which not only explores the journeys of the poet between 1947 and 1985, but also references the evolution of the poet and the man
  • After reading through the eight different examples that I chose from the book (as suggested above), I noticed that the two main themes Snyder was exploring throughout his book greatly related to my FMP; these were:
    • “The Art Of Walking” which is clearly evidenced through the subject of his poems that, as stated above, are textual documentations of Snyder’s journeys – this therefore greatly relates to my FMP as I am also looking into “The Art Of Walking” through the use of this technique (or “art”) as a part of my projects methodology to try and trigger the recollection of the memories I associate with my Grandpa
    • “The Representation of Land” (through the written word), which is evidenced through his pure descriptive and poetic style of writing (discussed in more detail below) as he uses this text to create a personal yet somehow generalized representation of the landscape that he is exploring which can be used to alter the readers preconceived interpretation of the specific land he is investigating – similar to the work of William Eggleston (discussed in some of my previous research), this concept of representing the land can be applied to my FMP as I can use my own experiences with the Lake District landscape to affect how I represent particular locations, which in turn will offer a varied opinion on the landscape that viewers may have experienced through more stereotypical representations
  • However, although the main themes discussed within this book greatly relate to the themes I am looking at for my FMP, as you have already seen from my research above, I have researched into other resources that discuss these particular theories in more in-depth and specific detail, which has influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself

 

Style of Writing:

  • As I read through each of the selected poems from this book (the first poem of each section), I soon noticed that the style of writing (as well as the length of the poem) varies dramatically depending on the piece of writing and the subject that they are depicting – this has therefore made it very difficult to include a reflection on a generalized style and so I have decided to analyze sections of each of the poems that I noticed throughout my reading
  • The first thing that anybody (most likely) reads is the title of a piece of work, or in this case, the title of the poem
    • When looking at the titles in the examples that I focused on, although these also vary in style (including metaphorical and factual styles), these have been carefully created in order to briefly describe the concept of the poem, allowing the viewer to gain a slight contextualized understanding before continuing to read the more creative, and slightly less identifiable, passage
  • One of the next things that I noticed about these particular poems, was the physical layout of the words on the page
    • Once again, varying depending on the work, these layouts, which are very hard to describe, can differ from a simple “stereotypical” poem structure, to a more spread out and fragmented layout – although this aspect may be daunting to a number of individuals, after reading the poem, they will begin to notice that these layouts act as a visual representation to some of the features discussed within the poem, whilst also affecting the flow of the piece of writing, which could be used by the viewer to symbolize the emotion attached to the landscape and the narrative depicted
  • Now, in relation to the actual style of writing that Snyder employed, each of his poems were incredibly descriptive, as well as poetic, through the use varying language tools such as metaphors, similes, repetition and rhyme
    • The writing style that Snyder used, in conjunction with the personal subject that he described (his journey’s), therefore meant that his poems were able to elicit a personal and subjective viewpoint of the land, whilst also presenting this opinion in a style of writing that enhanced the subjects generalization and therefore the viewers accessibility (as briefly mentioned above)
    • This particular style of writing (descriptive and poetic) also creates a very immersive piece that aloes the viewer to feel drawn to the work, whilst also providing an imaginative experience where the viewer feels immersed within the landscape and the narrative
    • The writing style used throughout these poems, which, as suggested above, vary depending on the piece of writing, also create a differing flow through the work, which can be used by the viewer as a symbolic reference to some of the more specific aspects described within the landscape subject – for example, a more jagged, stop-start flow can be used to reference the sharpness of the rocks, whereas a smooth, peaceful flow can be used to represent a running stream
  • Finally, the last thing that I noticed in relation to the poems layout was the inclusion of the name of the place that was depicted within the poem (which was found in italics at the end of each piece of writing) – this therefore provided the viewer with a greater understanding surrounding the subject depicted in the poem, which then meant that the ideas which were formed through the reading of the work could potentially alter through the inclusion of this piece of information

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After briefly reading through Gary Snyder’s “Left Out in the Rain”, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing and the book itself that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP (as well as the use of the main themes to aid in the contextualization of my project – but, as stated above, I have researched into other resources that discuss these particular theories in more in-depth and specific detail, which influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself)
  • The main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from this particular piece of research, as suggested above, includes the generalized style and aesthetics used within the text (including the title to briefly describe the concept of the poem, and the layout and the style of writing to represent aspects included within the poems narrative), in order to enhance the audiences contextualized understanding of the personal subject that has been depicted in the writing, thus increasing their accessibility
    • I can therefore relate this to my FMP as, because I am considering the use of accompanying text within my final exhibition piece, this research has allowed me to gain knowledge associated with pieces of text including the importance of providing snippets of information to suggest the projects concept (for example, the title), to use text to create a greater contextual understanding of the project and thus the accessibility of my viewers, and, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, to use the style and layout of the text to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project – please note, I may also take time to experiment with the use of this style of writing (as well as others that I come across), as I personally feel that more creative writing styles (compared to the factual) can be used to symbolize the personal and I also want to conduct experiments to see which style best fits with the concept of my project

 


 

Edward Thomas (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th October 2014), he also suggested that I read some poems written by Edward Thomas

  • Now, very similar to the suggestion he made with regards to Gary Snyder, after the discussions that we had in this one-to-one session, I knew that Matt Johnston mainly wanted me to look into these poetic pieces of writing due to the overarching subject that they depict (the land) as well as the idea of using text as a contextualizing tool (especially in conjunction with the stories and memories that I want to portray throughout my FMP)
  • Bearing this in mind, I then did some brief research into some of Thomas’ published books that provided a collected range of poems that he had written over the years, and soon decided to focus my research on the book “Edward Thomas: Selected Poems”
  • However, as this book contains over 150 poems of his, I decided that to save time with my research, I would read a selection of 8 random poems (in order to provide the same level of research I undertook for Snyder’s work), and that I would then use these poems to create a generalized reflection and analysis of his works (including the main themes discussed and the style of writing he employed)
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the main themes discussed within these particular poems, as well as some reflections on the style of writing, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Main Themes Discussed:

  • Edward Thomas: Selected Poems” is a collection of writings by Edward Thomas that was selected from his manuscripts and typescripts, which explores his relationship and vision in relation to the natural world throughout England
  • After reading through the eight random examples that I chose from the book (as suggested above), very similar to the work of Gary Snyder, I noticed that the main theme explored throughout this book was “The Representation of Land”
    • Similar to “Left Out in the Rain”, this is evidenced through his pure descriptive and poetic style of writing (discussed in more detail below) as he uses this text to create a personal yet detached (and therefore generalized) representation of the English landscape that he is exploring, which can alter the readers preconceived interpretation of the specific land he is investigating – similar to the work of William Eggleston (discussed in some of my previous research), this concept of representing the land can be applied to my FMP as I can use my own experiences with the Lake District landscape to affect how I represent particular locations, which in turn will offer a varied opinion on the landscape that viewers may have experienced through more stereotypical representations
  • However, although this main theme greatly relates to one of the themes I am looking at for my FMP, as you have already seen from my research above, I have researched into other resources that discuss this particular theory in more in-depth and specific detail, which has influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself

 

Style of Writing:

  • Similar to Snyder’s work, as I read through each of the selected poems from this book (selected at random), I soon noticed that the style of writing (as well as the length of the poem) varies dramatically depending on the piece of writing and the subject that they are depicting – this has therefore made it very difficult to include a reflection on a generalized style and so I have decided to analyze sections of each of the poems that I noticed throughout my reading
    • However, the first aspect that I noticed when reading these particular poems was how the differed dramatically from the style that Snyder employed
    • This is because, although Thomas is still looking into a personal viewpoint and “The Representation of Land”, he rarely writes using the first person
    • Through the description of the events and the general narrative of the poems, this therefore allows him to suggest his personal viewpoint to the reader whilst also appearing detached from the subject which therefore makes the poem more generalized and accessible to the viewer
  • Similar to the poetic works of Snyder, when looking at the title of the poem in the examples that I focused on, although these too vary in style (including metaphorical and factual styles), these have been carefully created in order to briefly describe the concept of the poem, allowing the viewer to gain a slight contextualized understanding before continuing to read the more creative, and slightly less identifiable, passage
  • In relation to the physical layout of the words, when skimming through this book I noticed that these layouts differed from the work of Snyder as they tended to represent the more “classic” and “stereotypical” displays associated with the written word (including simple paragraphs for different proses, and short simple lines for poems)
    • This can therefore be used by the viewer to represent the time in which these particular pieces of writing were written, as they can associate the “classical” layout with earlier literary periods
  • Now, in relation to the actual style of writing that Thomas employed, not only do they differ to Snyder’s in terms of the literary person that they use, but there are also a variety of different types of writing included within this particular collection that have been carefully considered in order to best represent the subjects narrative within the written piece
    • As suggested above, however, all of Thomas’ writings are very descriptive and have been created in such a way that allows him to suggest his personal viewpoint to the reader whilst also appearing detached from the subject, which therefore makes the poem more generalized and accessible to the viewer
    • Also, although he does include a variety of different writing types, he still includes stereotypical poems that incorporate poetic language tools such as metaphors, similes, repetition and rhyme
    • However, Thomas’ collection also included a number of prose autobiographies (including a war diary) and poetic short-stories which, written in a very descriptive and creative way (often using old English in terms of phrases and structure), was able to mirror the techniques he used within his poems whilst also providing the viewer with a larger, more easily understandable narrative
      • As suggested above, these types of text where therefore carefully considered depending on the subject that was being depicted, and usually represented the more serious narratives (meaning that the poems generally symbolized more personal events)
      • Also, relating back to this idea of ditching himself from his viewpoints on the land, within these particular pieces of work, Thomas also hid the reality of the characters (including himself) within the creation of a fictional character, allowing him to document a personal event that, through this technique, had been made more general and accessible to the viewer

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • Very similar to Gary Snyder’s “Left Out in the Rain”, after briefly reading through Edward Thomas’ “Selected Poems”, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing and the book itself that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP (as well as the use of the main theme to aid in the contextualization of my project – but, as stated above, I have researched into other resources that discuss this particular theory in more in-depth and specific detail, which influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself)
  • Similar to the work of Gary Snyder, the main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from this particular research, is not only the idea of the style and the aesthetics used within the text (including the title to briefly describe the concept of the poem, and the layout and the style of writing to represent aspects included within the poems narrative), but also the importance of choosing the correct type of text to best represent the narrative portrayed throughout the work – this then, obviously, enhances the audiences contextualized understanding of the subject that has been depicted in the writing, thus increasing their accessibility
    • I can therefore relate this to my FMP as, because I am considering the use of accompanying text within my final exhibition piece, this research has allowed me to gain knowledge associated with pieces of text including the importance of providing snippets of information to suggest the projects concept (for example, the title), to use text to create a greater contextual understanding of the project and thus the accessibility of my viewers, and, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, to use the style and layout of the text to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project – please note, I may also take time to experiment with the use of this style of writing (as well as others that I come across), as I personally feel that more creative writing styles (compared to the factual) can be used to symbolize the personal and I also want to conduct experiments to see which style best fits with the concept of my project

 


 

The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot” by Robert Macfarlane (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th November 2015), he suggested that I read the book “The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot” by Robert Macfarlane

  • However, as this book is a full length novel, I decided that to save time with my research, I would read the first and last chapters before skimming the middle section and reading an online review about the book (“The Old Ways by Robert Macfarlane Review” by Alexandra Harris – http://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/may/31/old-ways-robert-macfarlane-review)
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the main themes discussed within this particular book, as well as some reflections on the style of writing and the book itself, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Main Themes Discussed:

  • Using inspiration from fellow walker and writer Edward Thomas (who I have researched into above), this book has been created as a geographical biography that investigates an individuals understanding of another persons life through tracing back their paths
  • The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot” is a geological study of Britain that has been conducted by Macfarlane as a way of exploring in-depth categories and ideologies associated with the overarching theme of “Walking”
  • Some of the main categories discussed include:
    • Ideologies surrounding “The Old Ways” in relation to paths, and how individuals would use these particular tracks to connect them to other places or people
    • Psychogeography and how individuals can feel a strong sense of (psychological) connection through simply walking particular paths that either they, or someone that they know (of) has walked before – taking into account both personal memories and the history associated with these particular paths
    • The contemporary idea that walking and pathways are the language that has been found and created to allow individuals the ability to discuss and understand mutual sensory experiences
    • (Macfarlane also briefly discussed ideas surrounding the “Land Art Movement” (without identifying it with this title) through introducing the reader to works of art created by artists such as Richard Long and Hamish Fulton – which I have also researched into below)
  • However, although the main themes discussed within this book greatly relate to the themes I am looking at for my FMP, as you have already seen from my research above, I have researched into other resources that discuss these particular theories in more in-depth and specific detail, which has influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself

 

Style of Writing and the Book Itself:

  • As I read through this book (like stated above, by reading the first and last chapter in full before skimming the middle section) I noticed that each of the chapters started with a photograph of the landscape that was either discussed within the following chapter or simply related to the more specific theories explored
  • Macfarlane’s writing is a very creative and poetic piece of descriptive witting that has been informed with historical, psychological and literary context, which creates a piece of writing that is not only personal to Macfarlane (the writer) but is also accessible for the reader through providing them with a contextualized understanding of the personal aspects within the book
    • Within his book Macfarlane uses his impressive writing skills and textural structure to take the viewer down a literary pathway
    • Each chapter begins with a beautifully written description about the path that the chapter continues to discuss, by starting with a physical description (regarding the texture of the path, the type of bushes either side, etc.) before moving on to a more poetic description of the path through the use of metaphors and fictitiously adapted aspects (for example, ideas surrounding the journey taken by woodland animals through the identification of multiple footprints, etc.)
    • As we (the readers) are taken down this descriptive, literary journey, we are held in suspense wanting to know the location of the beautiful path that Macfarlane is describing, and it is only after the completion of this description that Macfarlane takes the time to sharply tell us the location and the destination of this particular path
    • Once we understand the paths location and destination, Macfarlane then moves on to contextualize the path with personal experiences and academic theories that relate to the fundamental climax, ideology the chapter has been dedicated to

 

FMP Inspiration

  • After briefly reading through Robert Macfarlane’s “The Old Ways: Journey on Foot”, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing and the book itself that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP (as well as the use of the main themes to aid in the contextualization of my project – but, as stated above, I have researched into other resources that discuss these particular theories in more in-depth and specific detail, which influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself)
  • As suggested above, Macfarlane uses photographs to visually describe the accompanying text and, through the use of accompanying text within my FMP, I will be incorporating this idea of accompanying aspects as I want to be able to choose/create a photograph and piece of writing that compliment each other in terms of content insuring that neither overshadow the other
  • Also, Macfarlane informed his piece of writing with both personal experiences and academic theories and, although he did this textually, I want to try and create a piece of work that balances the personal with the academic in order to, as suggested above, create a more accessible project for the viewer through providing them with a contextualized understanding of the personal aspects within my project
  • Finally, I feel that Macfarlane’s creative style of writing (that was still informed by academic context), is a style of writing that I will want to experiment with through the creation of my accompanying text, as I feel that more creative writing styles (compared to the factual) symbolize the personal, making it an appropriate style to consider for my FMP piece

 


 

Four Fields” by Tim Dee (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Matt Johnston on the 18th October 2014)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Matt Johnston (on the 18th November 2015), he suggested that I read the book “Four Fields” by Tim Dee

 

Main Themes/Ideas Discussed (in Reviews):

  • Four Fields” is the second book written by Tim Dee that constitutes the identity of a “travel book, naturalist’s journal and a cultural examination” through the exploration of different repeated field habitats from around the world
    • These include a fen field in Cambridgeshire (Dee’s home garden), a southern field in Zambia, a prairie battlefield in Montana, USA, and a grass meadow in the Exclusion Zone at Chernobyl, Ukraine
  • Using his skills as a professional birdwatcher, it is suggested that the ideologies that Dee discuss are often associated with the act of a naturalist’s observation
  • Focusing on the idea that “the landscapes we inhabit are dynamic” (both in human management and seasonal changes), throughout this book, Dee is said to investigate ideas surrounding the interaction and affect that humans have on the natural landscape, as well as how the landscape can affect the self
  • In relation to the type of language and style of writing that Dee uses, it is noted that “Four Fields” is an “intensely personal book” that is “written in the same lyrical prose as ‘The Running Sky’”
    • Written honestly, it is suggested that Dee’s writing skills not only highlight his personal experiences with the locations discussed within his book, but that he also contextualizes his experiences with references to literary and historical concepts – which, from previous research, suggests that this makes the personal aspects of the book more accessible and understandable to the reader

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • As I was obviously unable to experience “Four Fields” by Tim Dee in person, and simply read through a couple of reviews surrounding the book, I therefore feel that the inspiration that I would have gained from the book has decreased in quantity
  • However, making the most of what I have read surrounding the ideologies and style of writing discussed/used by Tim Dee, I feel that the main aspect I will take away from this particular piece of research is the idea that he informed his personal experiences with references to literary and historical concepts and, (similar to Robert Macfarlane – see above) although he did this textually, I want to try and create a piece of work that balances the personal with the academic in order to, as suggested above, create a more accessible project for the viewer through providing them with a contextualized understanding of the personal aspects within my project

 


 

Wanderlust: A History of Walking” by Rebecca Solnit (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I read the book “Wanderlust: A History of Walking” by Rebecca Solnit

  • However, similar to “The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot” by Robert Macfarlane, as this book is a full length academic book and novel, I decided that to save time with my research, I would read the first and last chapters before skimming the middle section and reading a couple of online reviews about the book (“’Wanderlust: A History of Walking’ by Rebecca Solnit: A delightful and mind-expanding look at one of the activities that makes us human” by Andrew O’Hehir – http://www.salon.com/2000/04/27/solnit/ and “Nonfiction Book Review ‘Wanderlust: A History of Walking’” by Publishers Weekly – http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-670-88209-0)
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the main themes discussed within this particular book, as well as some reflections on the style of writing and the book itself, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Main Themes Discussed:

  • Appropriately named, “Wanderlust: A History of Walking” explores ideologies surrounding how walking, and its relationship through history, has lead to the evolution of Solnit’s home country, the United States of America
  • Highlighting the fact that paths are infinite and are encountered by everyone on Earth, in this book, Solnit uses her own experiences to discuss a history of walking whilst also presenting philosophical standpoints associated with this physical act
  • Wanderlust: A History of Walking” therefore explores ideologies surrounding the long historical association between the overarching theme of walking and philosophizing
  • Some of the main ideologies discussed include:
    • The connection between the world and the self that is distinguished through the act of walking (“Walking aligns the mind, the body, and the world…”), which includes ideas on how individuals associate themselves, in terms of thoughts and memories, with the surrounding world and landscapes (which return to the individual once they return to the place), and how new places offer individuals with new opportunities of thought
    • The idea that paths and journey’s are not only infinite due to the fact that everyone experiences them, but that an individual is constantly on a path through life, which doesn’t stop through times of questioning and hardship
    • The way in which the culture of walking has evolved out of the disembodiment of everyday life and how walking, in the modern day, is greatly related to pedestrianism and tourism
    • (Solnit also briefly introduces the reader to Henry David Thoreau (who was one of Solnit’s inspiration for the accumulated passion she has for walking and writing) and the idea that he to wrote about walking in the USA – who I have also researched into above)
  • However, similar to Robert Macfarlane’s book, although the main themes discussed within this book could be used to briefly relate to the walking methodology behind my FMP, as you have already seen from my academic research (please see the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post) I feel that the these resources discuss this methodological practice of walking in more in-depth and specific detail, which has influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the book itself

 

Style of Writing and the Book Itself:

  • Varying from the structure of a pure fictitious novel, Solnit’s book includes a contents page that presents the fact that this piece of writing has been split into four sections that include up to five different chapters (which, differing from Macfarlane’s “The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot”, enhances the academic feel of the book which is later reflected in the writing style used – please see below for more information)
    • Now, offering a similarity between this book and Macfarlane’s at the beginning of each of these sections (rather than the chapters) is a photograph of the landscape that was either discussed within the following section or simply related to the more specific theories explored
  • Another visual aspect of the book is the inclusion of quotes relating to the overarching theme of walking, which can be found at the bottom of the page in a bordered footer that reflects the graphics of a simply drawn path, and, due to the fact that the quote lead on to the following page, the inclusion of this aspect acts as a directional path through the book by drawing the reader onto the next page
  • Differing from Macfarlane’s writing, although Solnit’s writing includes personal aspects (adding a similarity between the two writing styles), the majority of her writing seems more factual (rather than more formal) as she tends to focus her work on the historical and philosophical aspects associated with the act of walking
    • However, with this being said, this book delicately combines small sections of descriptive “poetic” and personal experiences of pathways and walks with the more academic historical and philosophical aspects of the work that, similar to the writing by Macfarlane, offers the reader a contextualized understanding to the relevance of the personal aspects included
    • Also differing from Macfarlane’s book, the inclusion of descriptive section and chapter titles essentially erases the strong sense of suspense that the reader may feel through the description of some of the pathways and walks, but the swift transition from the academic to the poetic still provides the viewers with a softer sense of surprise, gaining their interest and intriguing them into finding the following creative release

 

FMP Inspiration

  • After briefly reading through Rebecca Solnit’s “Wanderlust: A History of Walking” (and briefly comparing it to the previous book by Robert Macfarlane, “The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot”) I soon found that I gained more inspiration for my FMP from Macfarlane’s book in term of the writing style that he used
  • However, with this being said, the similarities that I identified between Solnit’s and Macfarlane’s book meant that “Wanderlust: A History of Walking” still provided me some points of reference to take into account for the development of my FMP; these include:
    • The use of photographs to visually describe the accompanying text – through the use of accompanying text within my FMP, I will be incorporating this idea of accompanying aspects as I want to be able to choose/create a photograph and piece of writing that compliment each other in terms of content insuring that neither overshadow the other
    • Informing the piece of writing with both personal experiences and academic theories – which, similar to Macfarlane, although she did this textually, I want to try and create a piece of work that balances the personal with the academic in order to, as suggested above, create a more accessible project for the viewer through providing them with a contextualized understanding of the personal aspects within my project

 


 

A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells” Alfred Wainwright (independently found research)

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“A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells” is a seven-volume collection of illustrated accounts of the English Lake District that were created by Alfred Wainwright (who was a British fellwalker, guidebook author and illustrator).

  • Although this particular piece of research wasn’t suggested by any of my tutors, I thought that it was very relevant to my FMP and decided to spend time researching into these books for a number of different reasons (which have been discussed below)
  • However, as each of these books are approximately 200 pages long, I decided (in order to save time with my research) to take out a singular book that related to an area of the Lake District that I was exploring throughout my FMP (“The Western Fells”), and, as it is the aesthetics and combinations of features that I am interested in, I simply decided to read the introduction, the conclusion, and the section of the book dedicated to Haystacks (one of the fells that I am focusing on throughout my project due to it’s memorial significance)
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the reasons behind the inclusion of this particular piece of research, as well as some reflections on the unique aesthetics and writing style used within book itself, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Reasons for including it within my Research:

  • The first reason for including this particular collection within my research was that these particular books not only discussed the area of the Lake District (which I am obviously looking at for my FMP), but, due to the fact that they are illustrated walking guides, they also, obviously, made reference to ideas that can be associated with “The Art of Walking” (which has been discussed in previous research and also relates to a section of my methodology for my FMP)
  • The second reason behind my choice of including this within my research was the fact that both my Nanny and my Grandpa not only loved Wainwright as a writer, but they particularly enjoyed this volume of books as they so beautifully describe an area of the country that they loved so much, as well as the fact that they used these guide on numerous occasions when exploring the Lake District landscape
    • I thought that these books would be good to research as a way of gaining an understanding of how both my Nanny and Grandpa personally identified with the Lake District, which could be used to further enhance the connecting aspect of my project
  • The third and final reason for including these guides within my research is that, as suggested above, these books include unique aesthetic features, and I therefore thought that these aspects would be interesting to analyze as a part of development of my FMP in order to allow me to gain further inspiration regarding the inclusion of different features within my final piece

 

The Unique Aesthetics and the Style of Writing:

  • In relation to the aesthetics of these books, the first thing that readers notice about this particular collection is that everything is either hand-drawn or hand-written
    • This was one of Wainwrights signature aesthetics that could be found throughout each of his books and, although it is used to represent the original reasoning’s behind the creation of this collection (for personal benefit as a hobby) and can therefore be used to enhance the personal aspect of the series, due to the generalized subject matter that it discusses (the Lake District, which can be understood and enjoyed by a variety of different people) means that this collection of books is still extremely accessible to the readers, and that it simply adds and extra empathetic level to the text
  • The first hand-drawn feature of the book that I am going to discuss is Wainwrights inclusion of drawings of the hill/mountain that he is depicting in each of the sections
    • Through my own personal experience, when looking at the drawings of the fells that I have come to know, Wainwrights drawings show a great likeness to the landscapes reality
    • Now, although these drawings have clearly been included within these books in order to aid the readers understanding of the landscape, these particular “non-factual” sketches provide a reference behind the initial creation and collation of this information (which, as suggested above, was for personal benefit as a hobby)
  • The second hand-drawn feature that has been included throughout this book (which you may be able to see from the example pages included above) are the maps and diagrams
    • Providing a similarity to the drawings that have been discussed above, these aesthetic features have been included within the book in order to aid the readers understanding of the landscape, whilst also enhancing Wainwrights process and methodology throughout this illustrative documentation
    • However, the inclusion of these more academic illustrations can not only be used by the viewer to suggest Wainwrights personal academia, but they can also be questioned by the viewer in relation to the reasoning’s behind their inclusion, and can therefore be used to suggest that Wainwright perhaps thought that these illustrations could in fact be published at a later date – the inclusion of these aesthetic features have therefore not only provided the viewer with a greater understanding surrounding the subject within the book, but they have also gained a personal understanding relating to Wainwright as an individual
    • Also, in relation to the inclusion of both diagrams and maps, the diagrams appear to have been incorporated in order to further enhance the readers understanding of the landscape and context of the book, which increases the readers accessibility as well as expanding on the target audience
  • Finally, the third hand-written feature that has been included within this collection of books is the accompanying text
    • When reading through the introduction, the conclusion, and the section dedicated to Haystacks, I identified Wainwrights writing as both poetically descriptive and suggestive
    • In relation to the descriptive sections of the text, Wainwright uses a myriad of poetic language tools (such as personification and metaphors), which creates an intellectually informed yet beautiful piece of writing that describes the hills/mountains as if they are living, breathing things
      • This style included within the writing can therefore be used to represent the beauty of the subject discussed throughout the text, whilst also providing the viewer with an understanding into Wainwrights personal viewpoint in relation to the Lake District area, once again enhancing the empathetic feel associated with the books
    • On the other hand, with regards to the suggestive sections of the text, what I mean by this is that Wainwright includes particular suggestions in regards to the appropriate route to take, what weather to visit the hill/mountain in, etc.
      • Now, this style included within the writing can obviously be used to suggest the reasoning behind the publication of these notes into an guide format, but, through the creative way that Wainwright has asserted his suggestions, they do not appear to be “official” directions but more friendly pieces of advice – which therefore obviously enhances the viewers understanding behind Wainwrights temperament

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After briefly looking through Alfred Wainwright’s “A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: The Western Fells” I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing and the book itself that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP
  • The first piece of inspiration that I am going to take away from this particular piece of research is Wainwrights use of hand-written aspects which, as stated above, not only provides the viewer with information regarding the methodology behind the creation of the work, but also enhances the personal aspect associated with the project
    • This could therefore relate to my FMP as I could experiment with the use of hand-written text in order to enhance the personal aspects behind the concept of my project (please note, I will therefore be conducting this experimentation later in the developmental stages of my project)
  • However, the next piece of inspiration that I thought was interesting was Wainwright’s ability to include a variety of different aspects (including the drawings and more poetic writings) to suggest his incredibly personal association and conceptual reasoning behind the project, whilst still keeping it accessible for the viewer
    • This could therefore relate to my FMP, as I could therefore experiment with the inclusion of a variety of different archival aspects (such as Grandpa’s found photographs, collected materials, or text), in order to highlight the personal aspect and the methodology behind the project, whilst also including these items that would (hopefully) help to provide a greater contextual understanding from the viewer, thus improve their accessibility
  • Also, as suggested above, the maps that Wainwright included throughout his books not only aided in the viewers understanding of the landscape subject depicted, but also referenced the process and methodology that Wainwright underwent throughout this projects creation
    • I therefore feel that I could use this as inspiration within my FMP as, because I am looking into specific areas within the Lake District, the incorporation of a map could therefore enhance the viewers understanding of the locational aspect of the project whilst also referencing my methodology
  • Finally, the last bit of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular collection of books is the use and style of the accompanying text in order to represent and symbolize aspects related to the subject depicted, which in turn enhances the viewers contextualized understanding and accessibility to the project
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could therefore explore the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project (please note, although I suggested that I may also take time to experiment with the use of this style of writing, in order to see which best fits with the concept of my project this is only in relation to the poetic, descriptive aspect of the text, rather than the suggestive – this is because I feel that the suggestive text would only really fit within a guide like publication)

 


 

Flicktion (Independently found research)

During one of my previous modules called “351MC Photographic Narrative” (or “#Phonar”) we explored ideas relating to the concept of portraying a narrative within our images. For one of the weekly tasks called “Transformative Storytelling” (which can be found on my blog under “#Phonar Session Four Task – “Transformative Storytelling” (And Reflection)”, the link of which has been included below), I researched into the digital, photographic movement called “Flicktion”. As I have continued with the development of my FMP, I soon realized that I thought this particular photographic narrative concept would be relevant for my FMP, and so I decided to briefly revisit it within my research. Below you will be able to find a description of the “Flicktion” concept, followed by a link to my use of “Flicktion” within the #Phonar module, and information regarding how it has provided me with inspiration for my FMP:

 

Flicktion:

  • Flickr + Fiction = Flicktion. Take any single image and write a short story built around that image. Save in Flickr with the tag “flicktion”. This grew out of the efforts of Flickr user Andrew Losowsky who had posted a series of photos of doorbells from around the city of Florence (Italy) to which he added a few paragraphs of fiction about the people who might have been the ones living there. He coined the term “flicktion” and went on to publish a book of his works, and even saw it turned into a play. This must be the simplest form of story creation, but can make for an interesting pairing of a photo and the text of a story – it need not be literal, but does challenge one to write something more substantial (and interesting) for a caption.”

 

A Link to My Flicktion Example:

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After very briefly revisiting this concept of “Flicktion” I soon found that, although it could possibly relate to my FMP through the use of accompanying text to further explain the concept and narrative of a photograph, I feel that it actually provided me with an alternative writing style and methodology that I could argue against in terms of using it for my FMP
  • As suggested above, the text used within “Flicktion” is written in a fictional style and, although it can be argued that memories are fictitious in the sense that they never truly depict the entirety of an event, I personally had it in mind that my accompanying text would simply be a documentation (using poetic and descriptive language) of the memory I recall
    • However, with this being said, I may accidentally incorporate sections of fiction within my writing due to the fact that, as suggested in my academic research, my imagination could adjust the reality and timeline of the event that took place in the past
  • Finally, I also feel that the methodology used through the creation of “Flicktion” (the idea of looking at an image to create a textual narrative) is the opposite to the methodology that I have employed throughout my FMP (where I have used the narrative of my personal memories – which will end up being the subject of the accompanying text – to create a representational image)
    • However, with this being said, bearing the narrative of my memories in mind, I could perhaps experiment with this particular methodology (looking at the image to create the text), in order to write a piece of text that discuses the process of me revisiting these locations to trigger the recollection of the memories (rather than simply describing the event in the memory that I recalled, which was my initial plan)

 


 

“The Kaddu Wasswa Archive” by Andrea Stultiens (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 14th January 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 14th January 2015), he suggested that I look into Andrea Stultiens’ “The Kaddu Wasswa Archive”

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to the archival aspect of the project, as well as the projects inclusion of varying pieces of text (as, throughout the development of my FMP, I have used some of my Grandpa’s old images to add a sense of archive to the project, whilst also considering the use of text within my final piece in order to make my project more accessible to the viewer)
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore thought that it would be a good idea to conduct some brief research into the concept behind the creation of the project (and the reasoning’s behind the use of an archive), which can be found below in the format of a description from the Guernica Magazine website and an Amazon book description
    • Please note, although this particular project has been displayed as a book, unfortunately, after all of my efforts in trying to borrow a copy from another university, I was unable to attain a copy. I have therefore used what I could find online in order to inform my research and reflection
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research into the concept behind the project, before analyzing the use of an archive and pieces of text (rather than the aesthetics of the images), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

https://www.guernicamag.com/art/stultiens_kaddu_wasswa_archive_9_15_11/

http://www.amazon.com/The-Kaddu-Wasswa-Archive-Biography/dp/9460830293

The Kaddu Wasswa Archive: A Screencast of the Photos from Holly Constantine on Vimeo.

The Concept:

  • After reading through both descriptions from the Guernica Magazine and the Amazon website, I was able to gain information that suggested the “Kaddu Wasswa Archive” was a visual biography of the Ugandan, Kaddu Wasswa, who was a teacher and social worker that documented his activities in writings and photographs
  • Working with Wasswa’s grandson, photographer Arthur C. Kisitu, throughout this project, Stultiens took photographs of the archived documents and added a selection of both her and Kisitu’s photos that were taken during their meetings with Wasswa
  • Although this particular project appears to be incredibly personal through the fact that it focuses on the preservation of a single Ugandan man’s history, this archive also presents Uganda in its first 50 years of independence and tells the story of a country

 

The Archive:

  • As suggested above, after trying to attain a copy of “The Kaddu Wasswa Archive” book, I was, unfortunately, unable to do so, and have therefore based my research on the two main links included above (as well as deciding to focus on the archive as an artifact, rather than the aesthetics of the images, for the benefit of this particular piece of research)
  • When looking through these two online resources, as briefly suggested above, I noticed that this particular archive was constructed of a variety of different found and created artifacts, including photographs and documents from Wasswa himself and newly created photographs from both Stultiens and Kisitu
    • Now, although each of these archival aspects have all been attained from different places, the inclusion of these documents have been carefully considered meaning that the archive has been constructed in order to portray a particular narrative (in this case, the history of a man and the story of a countries independence)
    • Focusing on the inclusion of some of the individual aspects, however, when considering the found photos and documents that were provided by Wasswa, these can be used by the viewer to suggest the personal aspect of the archive as, although they may depict the history of the country, they have been provided by a single, Ugandan man and therefore only offer the viewer a singular, subjective viewpoint on the narrative and concept depicted
    • However, when positioned alongside the newly created photos (from both Stultiens and Kisitu), these images tend to document the methodology behind the archives creation (emphasizing the importance behind the creation of this particular project), and can therefore adapt the personal concept of the archive in order to create a more generalized narrative that enhances the archives association to the history of the country (and therefore creates a more accessible project for the viewer)
    • In relation to the textual aspects of the archive, these appear to have been included because, although the found and created photos do successfully depict the concept and narrative of the archive in a visual form, they enhance the contextualization of the images and therefore create a greater understanding from the viewer
      • Also, as you will see from the examples included above, although these pieces of text have been collected (and written) by a single individual (which obviously enhances the personal aspect of the project), some of these pieces of text appear to be written in a documentarian style, as well as being formal documents and articles, which depict important information regarding the countries history and this, along with the formality of the documents, can therefore be used to enhance the more generalized concept surrounding the archive in relation to the country
    • Finally, although I have decided that the reflection of the aesthetics of the images included within this archive wouldn’t be very beneficial for my FMP research, one aspect that I thought I should briefly look into was the juxtaposition of the images and the text
      • As you will see from some of the examples included above, in relation to images that have been juxtapositioned in relation to other images, there are numerous occasions where some of the found, archived photos have been positioned next to the newer, created photos
        • This can be seen through the use of varying aesthetics (such as the colouration of the image, the composition, etc.) And has been carefully considered by the two creators in order to enhance the concept of the countries history by providing visual evidence suggesting how the country has changed over the 50 years of independence
      • In relation to the positioning of images and text, most of the created archive documents that include text and images tend to encapsulate formal layouts associated with articles and official documents which, as stated above, enhances the concept of the countries history, as well as providing the viewer with a contextualized understanding surrounding the project
        • However, as you will also see from some of the examples included above, some of these archival documents (that incorporate both images and text) appear to have been created by Wasswa through eliciting a similar aesthetic to that of a scrapbook – this has therefore lead to the creation of text and image combinations that create interesting, and sometimes contrasting contextualization’s of the images, which can be used by the viewer to suggest Wasswa’s personal viewpoint on the concepts depicted throughout the archive

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into Andrea Stultiens’ “The Kaddu Wasswa Archive” I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the ideology of the archive that I thought could relate to my FMP (because, as suggested above, I have incorporated an archival aspect throughout the development of my FMP in the form of my Grandpa’s photos and collected natural materials)
  • As suggested above, archives tend to be carefully constructed from a variety of different documents and resources in order to create and portray a particular narrative and concept, and, using this particular project as an example, the careful consideration surrounding the creation of this archive (as well as the juxtaposition of different aspects within the collection) has resulted in the creation of both a personal and generalized narrative
    • I could relate this idea to my FMP as (although I was planning on doing this anyway), I could experiment with the careful consideration of including different archival aspects (including my Grandpa’s old photographs and the natural materials that I have collected, as well as their juxtapositions in relation to each other) in order to enhance the concept and narrative behind my project, whilst also experimenting with them to see if they alter the personal concept of the project into a more generalized and accessible one
  • Another aspect that I identified through researching into this particular project was the fact that some of the aspects within the archive were able to provide evidence (and enhance the understanding) of the methodology associated with the project, which therefore emphasized the projects concept of creation and importance
    • I therefore thought that I could relate this particular idea to my FMP as, through the inclusion of archival aspects such as Grandpa’s photographs and the collected natural materials, I could see if it enhances the methodological process behind the projects creation as well as it’s personal importance
  • Finally, the last bit of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular archival collection is the use and style of the accompanying text in order to emphasize the concept depicted throughout the project, which in turn enhances the viewers contextualized understanding and accessibility to the project
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could also experiment with the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project (please note, although I suggested that I may also take time to experiment with the use of varying styles of writing, in order to see which best fits with the concept of my project, I personally feel that the more documentarian and formal writing style used throughout this collection wouldn’t really fit in with my projects narrative and so I therefore think that I am not going to experiment with this particular style)

 


 

The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems” by Martha Rosler (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Emma Critchley on the 28th January 2015)

In a group tutorial that I had with Emma Critchley (on the 28th January 2015), she suggested that I look at Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”

  • After the discussion that we had in the group tutorial, I knew that Emma Critchley mainly wanted me to look at this particular piece of work due to its use of accompanying text that was used in close proximity to the photographs (as suggested previously, I am considering the use of accompanying text within my FMP exhibition piece in order to enhance the accessibility of the viewer)
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore decided to conduct some brief research into the concept behind the project as I thought that this would provide me with relevant information regarding the reasoning’s behind this close juxtaposition of image and text (the information that I gained was from two separate descriptions of the exhibition and can be found below)
    • Please note, as these were the only websites that offered descriptions and photographs of Martha Rosler’s exhibition, I have conducted my research and reflections based solely on these online resources
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research into the concept of the project, as well as reflections regarding the accompanying text and it’s juxtaposition to the images (rather than the aesthetics of the photographs), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (all of which can be found below):

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The Concept:

http://collection.whitney.org/object/8304

http://www.museumashub.org/neighborhood/new-museum/bowery-two-inadequate-descriptive-systems

  • After reading through both descriptions related to Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”, I was able to gain information surrounding the concept associated with this particular piece of work, and as suggested, within this project Rosler uses a combination of both images and texts in order to respond to Manhattan’s run-down bowery neighbourhood
  • Relating back to the title of this particular project (“The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”) Rosler explores the limitations of both photography and language as “descriptive systems” through juxtaposing photographs of bowery storefronts with shots of type-written synonyms associated with the depiction of a drunk state

 

The Accompanying Text:

  • As suggested above, for the benefit of this particular piece of research, I have decided to focus on the use of the accompanying text, rather than the aesthetics of the images or the exhibition piece as a whole
  • Although Rosler is primarily looking at the limitations of photography and language as “descriptive systems” (as stated above), after looking at a couple of examples of the pieces that have been included in the final exhibition grid, it is clear to see that, through the juxtaposition of the images and the text, Rosler has created a piece of work that has an enhanced conceptual understanding which can be used by the viewer to increase their accessibility of the project
    • What I mean by this is that if each of the aspects within the piece were viewed separately (the images, then the text) although they would still have some form of narrative depicted within them, it would be a much weaker version than narrative created from the combined features
    • This is because, when viewed together, both the images and the text create a stronger “descriptive system” as the gaps in the narrative of each of the aspects are then filled by the narrative of the accompanying piece, creating a fuller and denser version of the narrative depicted
    • This therefore enhances the concept of the project which allows the viewer to gain a greater contextualized understanding, thus increasing their accessibility to the project
  • Also, in relation to the actual style of writing that Rosler has chosen to employ throughout this collection, this aspect has also been carefully considered in order to enhances the concept and the narrative depicted throughout the piece of work
    • This is because, as suggested above, Rosler has used simple, (often singular) synonyms depicting words associated with drunkenness which can be used by the viewer as a symbolic reference to the state of inebriation where a drunk individual struggles to form correct sentences and words, which, as suggested above, therefore enhances the viewers understanding of the subject and concept of the project
  • Finally, although I previously stated that I was simply going to be looking at the accompanying pieces of text rather than the aesthetics of the images and the exhibition piece itself, I soon realized that a brief reflection on the use of text within an installation (rather than text included on an artists abstract) would be very beneficial for my FMP
    • As you will be able to see from the photographic examples included above, the use of this accompanying text within the installation has lead to the close-up interaction between the viewer and the walled pieces
      • Although I obviously didn’t see this exhibition in person, and can therefore only assume, I personally feel that this could have added a slight “edgy” atmosphere to the piece as it is not the usual viewing technique used by the viewers in an exhibition setting (as they usually have to stand behind a “safety” line)
      • This could therefore have been used by the viewer to enhance the immersive aspect of the project by symbolizing the same emotional sense that an individual may have experienced when walking past the abandoned bowery’s (or drunk individuals) depicted throughout the exhibition piece

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”, although it seems that this piece of research may be lacking in quantity compared to some of my other resources, this is simply because, as suggested above, I wanted to focus my research on the accompanying text rather than the aesthetics of the images, and I have therefore found a number of different textual aspects that I thought could relate to my FMP (because, as suggested above, I am planning on incorporating accompanying text within my final exhibition piece)
  • As suggested above, Martha Rosler carefully considered the juxtaposition of her images and text in order to create a piece of work that has an enhanced conceptual understanding which can be used by the viewer to increase their accessibility of the project
    • I therefore feel that this could relate to my FMP as, through incorporating accompanying text within my FMP, it could therefore hopefully enhance the conceptual and contextual understanding of viewer, therefore enhancing their accessibility into the project
  • Another bit of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular project is the style of the accompanying text in order to emphasize the concept depicted throughout the project, which, as previously suggested, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding and accessibility to the project
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could experiment with the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text within my FMP, in order to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project (please note, in relation to the inspiration that I have gained from these particular pieces of accompanying text, I am therefore planning on experimenting with the use of simple, singular, descriptive words that could not only be used to represent the location depicted within my piece, but also the personal memory I associate with these places)
  • Finally, the last piece of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this piece of research is, as suggested above, the fact that Rosler has used this accompanying text within her installation in order to enhance the close-up interaction of the viewer, which in turn creates an “edgy” atmosphere associated with the project whilst also symbolizing its concept
    • I therefore feel that the use of accompanying text in this way (to increase the interaction and the atmosphere of the project) could be used within my FMP exhibition piece in order to create a slight “edgy” atmosphere associated to my project, which could therefore be used to symbolize the emotional reaction that people may have to the fact that they are reading a personal (private) story

 


 

Karen McCarthy Woolf (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 14th January 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 14th January 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Karen McCarthy Woolf

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look at this particular individual as she was a poet that occasionally used photography as an inspiration to write, and could therefore offer me an alternative methodology to experiment with for my FMP
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore thought that it would be a good idea to conduct some brief research into McCarthy’s methodology, whilst also reading a couple of her poems that she created from photographic inspiration
    • Unfortunately, however, after conducting a relatively large amount of online research to try and gain this particular information, I was only able to find brief snippets of information surrounding her methodology, as well as a singular piece of written text that she wrote (called “Julie By The Sea”), for The Photographer’s Gallery, using one of her images as inspiration (please note, the online links that I used for these pieces of information can be found below)
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include incredibly brief research into the methodology behind her work, before analyzing this singular piece of writing that she has created in response to photography (rather than the aesthetics of the image), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

http://opennotebooks.co.uk

http://mccarthywoolf.com/projects/the-photographers-gallery/

 

The Methodology:

  • After reading through the online resources I found above, it provided me with very little information regarding the technicalities of her creative methodology
  • However, within one of McCarthy Woolf’s blog posts, she suggested that: “Photography is a big part of my creative process” and that she feels much more connected to the world around her when she photographs it
  • This therefore suggests that, as proposed by Anthony in the one-to-one tutorial, McCarthy Woolf uses photography in order to inspire her writings to create more immersive and “connected” pieces associated with the world around her

 

Julie By The Sea”:

JulieFinishingPost

  • Link to “Julie By The Sea” – http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/story-14-by-karen-mccarthy-woolf
  • When reading through this particular piece of writing by Karen McCarthy Woolf (as suggested above, I have decided to focus this research on the text rather than the accompanying photo), I noticed that the style of writing that she used for this specific piece was incredibly personal (which could be seen through the descriptive documenting of the event that was depicted within the accompanying photograph), before continuing on to associate the representations of the photograph to the concepts portrayed throughout her other pieces of work
    • In relation to the first section of the writing which created an accompanying narrative to fit in with the subject portrayed within the accompanying photo, this section tended to use simple, descriptive language as well as short sentences
      • Now, although I originally thought that this was a relatively underwhelming style of writing (rather than the creative flare that is usually associated with the work of a “poet”), I then thought that the readers would be able to use this sense of disappointment in order to represent the emotional response the author had to the cancelled event discussed within the writing
      • As I continued to read through this particular section of the text, however, I then realized that, when reading in accordance to the punctuation included, the use of these simple sentences creates a very measured rhythm, which can then be used by the reader to symbolize the swimming strokes that the author would have been using if the event she described within the text hadn’t been cancelled
      • These two literary techniques therefore further represent and enhance the subject of the work, creating a more immersive piece of writing that slightly decreases the personal aspect of the writing (as this technique can therefore appear more generalized and accessible to the viewer), allowing the viewer to gain a greater understanding in relation to the projects concept
    • Also, with regards to the second section of the writing (where McCarthy Woolf associates the representations of the photograph to the concepts portrayed throughout her other pieces of work), this piece of writing incorporates a slightly different style from the previous section
      • This is because, although it does go on to continue in the description of the accompanying photograph, this information is merged into a section that uses slight more academic, descriptive writing in order to discuss McCarthy Woolf’s continuing concepts and methodologies throughout other pieces of work
        • This can therefore be seen as mirroring that of a poetic artist biography, which is also further enhanced through McCarthy Woolf’s carefully considered literary techniques to affect the flow of the work (providing evidence of her poetic background)
      • However, with this being said, McCarthy Woolfe appears to have successfully merged the two differing subjects and writing styles, which provides the viewer with a greater understanding behind McCarthy Woolf as an artist, which, in turn, can also be used to create a greater contextualized understanding of the piece of writing and the accompanying photograph
  •  Finally, when looking at the juxtaposition of the piece of text and accompanying photograph, similar to Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”, the methodology that McCarthy Woolfe underwent within this particular example has meant that she has been able to create a piece of work that has an enhanced conceptual understanding which can be used by the viewer to increase their accessibility of the project
    • As suggested above, what I mean by this is that if each of the aspects within the piece were viewed separately (the images, then the text) although they would still have some form of narrative depicted within them, it would be a much weaker version than narrative created from the combined features
    • This is because, when viewed together, both the images and the text create a stronger “descriptive system” as the gaps in the narrative of each of the aspects are then filled by the narrative of the accompanying piece, creating a fuller and denser version of the narrative depicted
    • This therefore enhances the concept of the project which allows the viewer to gain a greater contextualized understanding, thus increasing their accessibility to the project

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into Karen McCarthy Woolf’s “Julie By The Sea”, similar to Martha Rosler’s “The Bowery In Two Inadequate Descriptive Systems”, although it seems that this piece of research may be lacking in quantity compared to some of my other resources, this is simply because, as suggested above, I wanted to focus my research on the piece of text rather than the accompanying photograph, and I have therefore found a number of different textual aspects that I thought I could relate to my FMP (because, as suggested above, I am planning on incorporating accompanying text within my final exhibition piece)
  • The main piece of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular piece of work by Karen McCarthy Woolf is, as suggested in the one-to-one session with Anthony Luvera, the methodology behind using photography as an inspiration to write
    • As suggested above, similar to my inspiration gained from “Flicktion”, although I feel that the methodology used through the creation of this piece of work (the idea of looking at an image to create a textual narrative) is the opposite to the methodology that I have employed throughout my FMP (where I have used the narrative of my personal memories – which will end up being the subject of the accompanying text – to create a representational image), I feel like I could perhaps experiment with this particular methodology (looking at the image to create the text), in order to write a piece of text that discuses the process of me revisiting these locations to trigger the recollection of the memories (rather than simply describing the event in the memory that I recalled, which was my initial plan)
  • As suggested above, Karen McCarthy Woolf’s juxtaposition of text and image, created a piece of work that has an enhanced conceptual understanding which can be used by the viewer to increase their accessibility of the project
    • I therefore feel that this could relate to my FMP as, through incorporating accompanying text within my FMP, it could therefore, hopefully, enhance the conceptual and contextual understanding from viewer, therefore enhancing their accessibility into the project
  • Finally, another bit of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular project is the style of the accompanying text in order to emphasize the concept depicted throughout the project, which, as previously suggested, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding and accessibility to the project
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could explore the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text within my FMP, in order to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • Please note, in relation to the inspiration that I have gained from this particular piece of text, I am therefore planning on experimenting with the literary, descriptive depiction of an event that took place (i.e. my memories or the revisiting of the locations) within my accompanying text for my FMP

 


 

David Rule (independent research)

As you may have seen, on Wednesday 11th February 2015 I attended a lecture and group tutorial taken by artist, David Rule. After sitting through his lecture, I soon realized that his work greatly related to my FMP through his use of text (because, as previously stated, I am considering the use of accompanying text within my FMP exhibition piece in order to enhance the accessibility of the viewer)

  • Now, although his lecture provided me with a lot of relevant background information (as well as an answer to my question regarding the style of text – the link to this blog post can be found below), I therefore decided to conduct some more, brief, research into his work and methodologies
    • Unfortunately, however, after conducting this brief research, I found it very difficult to find any biographical and methodological information about Rule, and so therefore decided to stick with the information that I had already attained from the practitioner talk
  • Also, within this particular practitioner talk, Rule described the first piece of work that he had created (in the format of a book), which situated a photograph alongside a piece of text consisting of 1000 words (looking into the concept behind the saying: “A photograph is worth a thousand words”)
    • Now, although I thought that this particular piece of writing would have been very beneficial to research into for it’s relevance to my FMP (using both images and text to narrate each other), unfortunately, when I went to conduct further research into this specific piece, I was unable to find any online information on it (apart from the brief description Rule provided us within the lecture)
    • As this was the case, I therefore decided to focus this piece of research on his style of writing throughout other, numerous pieces and, after reading through a selection of his works, I have attempted to reflect on the generalized style and aesthetics that he tended to use
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include the relevant pieces of information that I gained from the practitioner talk that he provided us, before analyzing the generalized style of writing that he used, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

David Rule: A Screencast of his Website from Holly Constantine on Vimeo.

 

Practitioner Talk (Relevant Information):

  • https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2015/02/11/352mc-professional-photographic-practice-lecture-6/
  • As suggested above, after re-reading the notes that I took during David Rule’s practitioner talk, it provided me with some brief information surrounding the concept and methodologies behind his artistic, writing works
  • Within this particular lecture, Rule suggested that his style of writing could still be seen as having a close association with the concept of photography, as he uses his writing skills to record and represent an event, much like a camera would do
  • Rule then further explained some of the reasons behind his use of text and suggested that he was very much interested in the idea of whether the photograph could alter the text, and vice versa, as well as the fact that he enjoyed experimenting with “inappropriate” forms of storytelling (meaning that they’re not the best way to display the story that he wants to tell, but that they are very curious to both write and read)
  • At the end of the talk, our tutor then conducted a question and answer session, which provided me with the opportunity to ask a question that I thought was relevant to my FMP research. This can be found below, along with the answer that rule provided:
    • My question: “How do you decide which style to write in? – You look at different techniques such as dialogs, novels, poetry, but, for example, do you write more poetic pieces if it’s a more personal project?”
    • His answer: “… I don’t think that you can really decide on what style of text to write, it usually comes to you with the project. I don’t think you should think too much about it, it just needs to happen and be true to both you and your project and the storytelling capability

 

The Style of Writing:

  • As suggested above, for this particular piece of research, as I was unable to gain further access to the particular piece of work that I thought would be most relevant for my FMP (the one that used both photography and text to depict ideas surrounding the saying “a photograph is worth a thousand words”), I therefore decided to read through a selection of his works in order to try and reflect upon the generalized style and aesthetics he used throughout his text (rather than focusing on individual pieces)
  • Similar to both Gary Snyder’s and Edward Thomas’ work, as I read through each piece of work (that I randomly selected), I soon noticed that the style of writing (as well as the length of the piece) varies dramatically depending on the piece of writing and the subject that they are depicting – this has therefore made it very difficult to include a reflection on a generalized style and so I have decided to analyze sections of each of the writings that I noticed throughout my reading
  • When reading through the pieces of work, the first thing that I noticed about Rule’s style of writing was the fact that most of his works were usually written in a prose format and tended to seem incredibly personal through the literary person he was writing in (the first person) and some of the language techniques that he used
    • As I identified throughout most of his works, Rule uses very descriptive language, as well as the first person, in order to document personal and everyday events (which, as suggested above, provides a similarity between photography and writing through his chosen form of documentation)
      • Within these particular, personal writings, Rule tends to use short and simple sentences which, through the subject that they depict and the flow of writing that they create, can be used by the viewer to represent Rule’s train of thought as he is writing this particular piece – in other words, Rule tends to create pieces of work that seem to document all of the thoughts and opinions that are “running through his mind” at the particular moment in time when he started to write
    • In relation to this idea of documenting everyday events, as well as the thoughts that are “running through his mind”, Rule also tends to create pieces of writing that simply document the dialoged between two or more people
      • This obviously creates a very personalized piece of text which, through the way he has documented the conversation, makes the viewer feel engaged and involved within this particular, personal event
    • In some of his personal works, Rule also creates incredibly engaging and immersive pieces through his use of specific language, such as rhetorical questions
      • This therefore creates a very thought-provoking piece which, as briefly suggested, creates an immersive atmosphere for the viewer as it enhances their proactive engagement with the work, due to the fact that they begin to try and answer the questions provided to them
    • In regards to each style of personal writing described above (descriptive, dialogue, and immersive), although they may vary in the language and textual aesthetics used throughout the piece, each of these personal works therefore allows the viewer to gain a greater understanding behind Rule as an individual, which they can then use to apply to other pieces of work, creating a greater contextualized understanding and increasing their accessibility to the piece
  • Also, stepping away from the personal, descriptive work that Rule creates, another form of writing that he also occasionally uses is that of a poetic nature
    • Within each of his poems (that I read) Rule carefully considers the use of language and structure of the poem in order to create a symbolic flow throughout the piece, which can often be used to represent the subject that his work is depicting
  • Finally, although this doesn’t necessarily focus on the specifics of some of his pieces of writing, Rule also enjoys looking into ideas of irony and puns by creating a piece of work associated with well known sayings – for example, where he writes 1000 words based on a photograph in order to represent the saying: “A photograph is worth a thousand words
    • Now, although the style of writing that he uses for these particular ironic pieces may be in his usual, personal prose or poetic format, because of the fact that he looks into well-known and identifiable sayings obviously enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the piece, which can therefore be used to increase their accessibility

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After briefly reading through a number of pieces of work by David Rule, and reflecting on the generalized style of writing that he tended to use throughout numerous pieces of work, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP
  • Although this doesn’t really relate to the reflections that I made regarding David Rule’s pieces of textual work, the main piece of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this conducted research is the answer that he gave me to my question within the lecture, where he suggested that I shouldn’t think too much about the style of text that I use within my FMP exhibition piece, and that it just needs to “happen” and “be true to both me and my project and the storytelling capability”
    • As I have continued through the development of my FMP, I have kept in mind my preferred style of writing (creative prose that uses varying language techniques to elicit the emotion represented throughout the narrative), which I feel would fit in with the concept of my FMP, and I am therefore, obviously, planning on experimenting with this particular style throughout the experimental stages of my project
  • Focusing on the reflections that I made with regards to Rule’s style of writing, as suggested above, Rule obviously created personal pieces of work, but through his use of specific textual techniques (such as the use of dialog and rhetorical question, as well as the subject of the text), Rule was able to create engaging and immersive pieces of work that not only provided the viewer with a greater understanding to Rule as an individual, but therefore enhanced their contextualized understanding of the work as a whole, which thus enhanced the accessibility of the viewer
    • I could therefore apply this to my FMP because, although my accompanying text will most likely depict a personal (and emotional) narrative surrounding the memories that I recall in relation to my Grandpa, I could experiment with the use of these specific techniques in order to see if it enhances the viewers immersion and engagement with my project, and therefore their accessibility
  • Finally, another bit of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this particular project is the style of the accompanying text in order to emphasize the concept depicted throughout the project, which, as previously suggested, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding and accessibility to the project
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could explore the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text within my FMP, in order to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • Please note, in relation to the inspiration that I have gained from these particular pieces of text, as briefly mentioned above, I am therefore planning on experimenting with the personal but immersive style of writing that Rule employed to enhance the accessibility of his work within my accompanying text for my FMP

 


 

Hamish Fulton (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with David Rule on the 11th February 2015)

In a group tutorial that I had with David Rule (on the 11th February 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Hamish Fulton

  • After the discussion that we had in the group tutorial, I knew that David Rule mainly wanted me to look at his work as he was a “Walking Artist” and so would provide me with an insight into this technical methodology that I was also employing within my FMP, (which also meant that he was a part of the “Land Art Movement” that I have previously researched – please see under “Research into the Land Art Movement” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post), as well as his use of text in his final outputs
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore thought that it would be a good idea to conduct some brief research into the concepts and methodologies behind Fulton’s work, which can be found below in the format of a Tate written biography
  • Also, please note that, as Hamish Fulton has a large number of artistic works that would be relevant to this piece of research, similar to my previous research regarding David Rule, I have simply decided to look through a couple of his examples before attempting to make a generalized reflection on the aesthetics and style of writing
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research into the concepts and methodologies behind his work (including his association with the “Land Art Movement”), before focusing on my attempt to generally reflect on a number of his artistic pieces, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

Hamish Fulton: A Screencast of his Website from Holly Constantine on Vimeo.

The Concept and Methodology (including the “Land Art Movement”):

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/hamish-fulton-walking-journey

  • After reading through the artist biography written by the Tate, I was able to gain information surrounding Hamish Fulton’s preferred concepts to explore and the methodologies he employs
  • Within this piece of text, the Tate suggested that Fulton preferred to be identified as a “Walking Artist” and later went on to discuss the fact that a central characteristic of his practice was the direct, physical engagement with the landscape
  • Following on from this, the Tate then went on to further explain Fulton’s methodologies and suggested that he begun to make short walks, and then photographic works, about the experience of walking, and later included a quote from Fulton himself that said: “I only make art resulting from the experience of individual walks
  • This therefore relates to my FMP because, although I am not technically using a walking technique to physically mark the landscapes I am documenting (referring to the “Land Art Movement” that I have discussed in more depth in previous research), walking is a major part of the creation of my FMP as I am using it to revisit these particular places, and walk down the paths I experienced with my Grandpa, in order to trigger the fading memories that I have of him, enhancing the possibility of reconnecting

 

The Art (aesthetics and style of writing):

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  • As suggested above, similar to the research I conducted above on David Rule, for this particular piece of research, Fulton had a large number of artistic works that could be relevant to my FMP research and so, to save myself some time, I therefore decided to read through a selection of his works in order to try and reflect upon the generalized style and aesthetics he used throughout his text (rather than focusing on individual pieces)
  • After looking through a selection of Fulton’s work, I noticed that the style and general aesthetics of the text that he used appeared to be consistent over each of his projects
    • In relation to the style of writing that Fulton employed, within his installations, Fulton usually used simple but descriptive (and in some instances, formal) text in order to represent the key, “technical” pieces of information associated with the walk (including place, date, and time), as well as using singular words to highlight the key features of the land and the walk that he experienced (such as “sea”, “cloud”, “mountain, etc.)
    • As for the aesthetics of the text, this not only refers to the font and colour used, but also to the visual layout and presentation of the text within the installation piece
      • With regards to the font that Fulton has used throughout each of his pieces, these can be described as a very “technical” and “formal” font that can be used by the viewer to enhance the importance of the technical information displayed within the text (for example, the date, time, etc.), which can then be used as a contrast to the suspected softness of a piece of work associated with the land
      • In relation to the colour that Fulton uses for his particular pieces of installation text, these are (usually) depicted in both black and white (and sometimes grey), which, similar to the use of varying text sizes (that I have discussed below) enhances the conceived importance of some pieces of text over the other (such as the slightly more in-depthdescriptions of the walk, rather than the single words associated with the land)
      • Now, with regards to the layout of the text, this not only includes the sizing of the font (as briefly discussed above), but also the visual display of the pieces of writing
        • Looking at the sizes of the fonts included, as suggested above, these have been carefully considered (along with the colour of the text), in order to enhance the importance of one piece of textual information over the other (such as the slightly more in-depth descriptions of the walk, rather than the single words associated with the land)
        • Also, as you will see from the examples included above, Fulton has decided to display his text in particular and unusual formats which, once the contents of the text has been read, can be used to symbolise some of the main land aspects that he experienced within this particular walk (for example, a triangular shape is used to represent that of a mountain)
      • Now, looking back at each of these carefully considered textual aspects (including the style and aesthetics of the writing), these allow the viewer engage with the pieces of work (including its documented and representational concepts), thus allowing them to gain a greater contextualized understanding surrounding these projects, making the work more accessible to the viewer
  •  When researching into Fulton’s work, I also came across a couple of his pieces that incorporated both photography and text
    • Now, although I am not going to be focusing on the specific aesthetics of the images included, I thought that looking at the relationship between the text and the photograph would be good to include within my research
    • As seen within these particular, photographic examples, Fulton tends to use the same style of writing that he has employed throughout his purely textual pieces
    • However, through the inclusion of an accompanying photograph within these particular artistic pieces, the narrative behind the text is enhanced as the photograph provides visual information about the walk that has been excluded from the text
    • This therefore creates a greater contextualized understanding from the viewer, which therefore increases their accessibility to the project
  • Finally, although I stated that I wouldn’t be looking at the specific aesthetics of the images included within Fulton’s work that incorporates both photographs and text, when looking at these particular pieces, I noticed that he also used a particular “middle-of-the-road” aesthetic to document one of his paths (similar to Gossage, Gaffney, and Long)
    • Now, although this compositional methodology has primarily been used by Fulton as a way of documenting the path that he walked down for this particular project, the compositional structure of these images (including the use of leading lines), can be used by the viewer to symbolize the idea of travelling towards a particular destination, which, in relation to Fulton’s work, can therefore be used to enhance the “Art of Walking” methodology employed by Fulton in the creation of his project pieces

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After briefly reading looking through the work of Hamish Fulton, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing (as well as the aesthetics of one of his images) that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP
  • The main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from this particular piece of research, as suggested above, includes the generalized style and aesthetics used within the text (including the style of writing and the aesthetic layout of the text), which, as previously stated, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the subject that has been depicted in the writing, thus increasing their accessibility
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could experiment with the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text within my FMP, in order to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • Please note, in relation to the inspiration that I have gained from these particular pieces of text, although I personally don’t feel as though some of these literary techniques would work well as accompanying text (including the unusual layouts to depict aspects of the land), I will attempt to experiment with these techniques as a singular final major piece (rather than my original photographic piece with accompanying text) in order to see if they create a more successful and accessible project for my viewers
      • However, with this being said, in relation to my projects accompanying text, I am planning on experimenting with the use of simple and descriptive language to depict more “technical” aspects of the location that I revisited (such as the name of the place, the distance, and the time, for example), in order to see whether it creates a piece of text that enhances the audiences contextualized understanding as well as their accessibility to my FMP
  •  Finally, the last piece of inspiration that I will be taking away from Fulton’s work is the fact that, as suggested above (similar to Gossage, Gaffney, and Long), Fulton used a “middle-of-the-road” composition within his landscape path photographs, which can be used by the viewer to suggest the travelling towards a particular destination
    • I could therefore apply this particular compositional methodology to my FMP as I could use it to symbolize this idea that, whilst visiting these different locations within the Lake District, they are triggering my psychological journey to the memories of my Grandpa

 


 

Richard Long (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with David Rule on the 11th February 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with David Rule (on 11th February 2015), he suggested that I look at the work of Richard Long

  • Now, as you may have seen from my previous research, although after the discussions I knew that he mainly wanted me to look at Richard Long’s work in relation to the “Land Art Movement” he was a part of (which I have previously researched, please see under “Research into the Land Art Movement” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research” blog post), as well as his use of text in his final outputs, as I was looking into his images, I noticed a very specific compositional methodology that he employed, which I reflected on above
  • This piece of research, however, will be dedicated to Long’s inclusion in the “Land Art Movement”, as well as his use of text in his final outputs
  • Bearing this in mind, I therefore thought that it would be a good idea to conduct some brief research into the concepts and methodologies behind Long’s work (including his association with the “Land Art Movement”), which can be found below in the format of a Tate written biography
  • Also, please note that (similar to the work of David Rule and Hamish Fulton), as Richard Long has a large number of artistic works that would be relevant to this piece of research, I have simply decided to look through a couple of his examples before attempting to make a generalized reflection on the aesthetics and style of writing
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to include brief research into the concepts and methodologies behind his work (including his association with the “Land Art Movement”), before focusing on my attempt to generally reflect on a number of his artistic pieces, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

The Concept and Methodology (including the “Land Art Movement”):

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/richard-long-1525

  • Similar to the work of Hamish Fulton discussed above, after reading through the artist biography written by the Tate, I was able to gain information surrounding Richard Long’s preferred concepts to explore and the methodologies he employs
  • Within this piece of text, the Tate provided me with information suggesting that Long was closely associated with the emergence of the “Land Art Movement” (which I already suggested above and have previously conducted more in-depth research into), as he tended to create sculptures that were made as a result of different walks
  • Following on from this, the Tate then suggested that Long employed different modes of presentation (sometimes combined) in order to bring his experiences of nature back into the museum or gallery
  • Finally, the Tate then included a piece of information provided by Long which suggested that “the meaning of his work lay in the visibility of his actions, rather than in the representation of a particular landscape
  • Similar to what was suggested above under Hamish Fulton’s work, this therefore relates to my FMP because, although I am not technically using a walking technique to physically mark the landscapes I am documenting (referring to the “Land Art Movement” that I have discussed in more depth in previous research), walking is a major part of the creation of my FMP as I am using it to revisit these particular places, and walk down the paths I experienced with my Grandpa, in order to trigger the fading memories that I have of him, enhancing the possibility of reconnecting

 

The Art (aesthetics and style of writing):

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  • As suggested above, similar to the research I conducted on both David Rule’s and Hamish Fulton’s work, for this particular piece of research, Long had a large number of textual works that could be relevant to my FMP research and so, to save myself some time, I therefore decided to read through a selection of his works in order to try and reflect upon the generalized style and aesthetics he used throughout his text (rather than focusing on individual pieces)
  • After looking through a selection of Long’s textual works, I noticed that his work could be seen as very similar to Hamish Fulton’s (that I reflected upon above), not only in terms of the concepts and walking methodologies he explored, but also in terms of the style and aesthetics that he used within his pieces of text
  • In relation to the style of text that Long employed throughout his written works, very similar to the work of Fulton, Long also used a relatively simple and descriptive style which included “technical” information such as the place, date, and time of the walk (for example)
    • However, differing away from Fulton’s work, Long also used more creative titles, as well as slightly more creative descriptions of the walk, in order to capture the viewers attention, whilst also creating a section of writing that could be used by the viewer to suggest the personal and philosophical aspects of the journey, in conjunction with the technical and the logistical
    • Also, Long experimented with the writing of longer pieces of text, which, although they have been written in the same simple and descriptive language, appear to be written in a very poetic form
      • This is because, due to the carefully considered gaps between the sections of description (for example), this creates a definite flow within the work, which can then be used by the viewer to symbolize the rhythm and pace that Long underwent on this particular walk
  •  With regards to the aesthetics of the text that Long has created (including the font, colour and layout), similar to Fulton, Long uses a font that can be described as very “technical” and “formal”, which can be used by the viewer to enhance the importance of the technical information displayed within the text (for example, the date, time, etc.), which can then be used as a contrast to the suspected softness of a piece of work associated with the land
    • However, with this being said, differing from the work of Fulton, the softness that is suspected in relation to projects that are associated with the land can be represent by Long’s specific use of personal and philosophical aspects included within the text
    • As for both the colour and the layout of Long’s text, these can both be identified as aspects that differ from the work of Fulton
      • In relation to the layout of Long’s textual pieces, these tend to differ greatly from Fulton’s as they mainly appear to be standardized textual layouts (such as aligned to the left or centrally), which, similar to the font of the text, can therefore be used by the viewer to enhance the importance of the formal, technical information displayed within the text (for example, the date, time, etc.)
      • However, with regards to the colour that Long uses within his text, this tends to vary from the standard black and white, and usually include colours such as reds, greens, blues, and yellows
        • This can therefore be used by the viewer (similar to the Fulton’s use of layout) to symbolize physical features within the landscape that Long has experienced and documented – for example, green could represent grass, whereas blue could represent the sky, etc.
  • Now, providing yet another similarity between both Long and Fulton’s work, these textual aspects (including the style and aesthetic) have been carefully considered in order to allow the viewer engage with the pieces of work (including its documented and representational concepts), thus allowing them to gain a greater contextualized understanding surrounding these projects, making the work more accessible to the viewer
  • Finally, as suggested in the biography written by the Tate, they suggested that Long experimented with modes of presentation (sometimes combined) in order to bring his experiences of nature back into the museum or gallery
    • Now, although this doesn’t necessarily relate to my choice to reflect solely on the textual aspects of long’s work, I thought it would be interesting to briefly research into in order to gain an understanding surrounding the methodology and creation of his exhibition installation, to see if it relates to my FMP
    • After conducting some brief research into this particular matter, I soon realized that Long actually collected a wide range of materials whilst on his walks, which were then used to create a variety of different sculptures
    • As suggested above, this therefore allowed him to bring his experiences of nature back into the museum or gallery, increasing the type of immersive information given to the viewer, which was then used to enhance their contextualized understanding of the project, and therefore their accessibility

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After briefly reading looking through the work of Richard Long, I soon found that there were a number of different aspects relating to the style of writing (as well as the use of natural materials in an exhibition setting) that I wanted to incorporate or experiment with through the development of my FMP
  • As his work provided a lot of similarities to Hamish Fulton’s work (looked at above), as you have most likely guessed, the main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from this particular piece of research is the inclusion of a considered (generalized) style and aesthetic used within the text, which, as previously stated, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the subject that has been depicted in the writing, thus increasing their accessibility
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs, I could experiment with the style and aesthetics of my accompanying text within my FMP, in order to represent some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • Please note, in relation to the inspiration that I have gained from these particular pieces of text, although I personally don’t feel as though some of these literary techniques would work well as accompanying text (including the unusual layouts to depict aspects of the land), I well attempt to experiment with these techniques as a singular final major piece (rather than my original photographic piece with accompanying text) in order to see if they create a more successful and accessible project for my viewers
      • However, with this being said, in relation to my projects accompanying text, I am planning on experimenting with the use of simple and descriptive language to depict more “technical” aspects of the location that I revisited (such as the name of the place, the distance, and the time, for example), in order to see whether it creates a piece of text that enhances the audiences contextualized understanding as well as their accessibility to my FMP
    • Finally, however, the last piece of inspiration that I will be taking away from Long’s work, as suggested in my research, is his methodology surrounding the collection of natural materials in order to create exhibition-ready installations and sculptures
      • Now, although I am not planning on creating sculptures within my FMP, this particular idea greatly relates to my project because, as suggested previously, I have incorporated an archival aspect throughout the development of my FMP in the form of collected natural materials, and this has therefore provided me with a possible idea surrounding how I could incorporate this within my degree show installation

 



 AUDIO:

 

Border Country”, “The Guide” And “Homes and Gardens” by Melanie Friend: (suggested when I asked Anthony Luvera about photographers that incorporate audio within their photographic pieces, on the 20th January 2015)

After a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera on the 14th January 2015, he suggested that I should look into photographers that include audio in their work, in order to gain inspiration surrounding my suggested idea of incorporating audio within my FMP (suggested in each of my proposals; please see in my please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”)

  • After I left this particular session, I then tried to conduct some brief research into different photographers that used audio and, unfortunately, was unable to find anyone that I thought was relevant to research for my FMP
  • I then decided to send an email to Anthony (on the 20th January 2015) in order to ask him for help, where he then replied with a suggestion to look into the work of Melanie Friend
  • After conducting some brief research into this particular individual, I was soon able to identify three specific projects that I thought related greatly to my FMP over some of her other works and, as suggested above, these were “Border Country”, “The Guide” And “Homes and Gardens”
  • Now, in order to save myself some time with regards to the research, although I have identified these three projects as being the most relevant to my FMP, for this piece of research I have decided to look through each of these projects and briefly reflect on generalized, audio aspects that can be applied to them all (rather than conducting in-depth research into all three)
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to reflect upon the concept that Friend explored throughout these three projects (which includes information from her website), as well as her use of audio to accompany different photographs (rather than focusing on the photographs themselves), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (in relation to the use of audio as an experiment, or within my final exhibition piece):

 

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Please note, unfortunately I was unable to embed the audio information onto my blog, and so, to listen to the accompanying audio for these particular projects, please visit the website using the links included below.

 

The Concept:

  • After reading through the descriptive, accompanying text associated with the project and it’s context, I was able to gain information surrounding Melanie Friend’s preferred concepts to explore throughout each of the three, identified projects
  • Within the text accompanying her “Border Country” project, it is suggested that this collection (of photographs and audio) have been created in order to provide a “rare insight into the experiences of immigration detainees”, and representations associated with asylum seekers and migrants being viewed as “other”
  • As for the text that accompanied “The Guide” project, this offered a lot less information regarding the concept and representations of the project, and simply suggested that it was about the aftermath of a Kosovo massacre
  • In relation to the third project that I am looking at, called “Homes And Gardens”, within it’s accompanying text it is suggested that this project focuses on the “police state” of Kosovo during the mid 1990s and tried to empower the subject, challenging the conventions associated with traditional photojournalism
  • Although each of these concepts appear to have no relevance to my FMP, after looking through each of the collections I soon noticed that an overarching theme depicted throughout is the idea of documenting something invisible (either through the documentation of a non-visual concept such as an experience, or through documenting the aftermath of a particular event)
    • This overarching theme therefore relates to my FMP because, through revisiting and documenting the specific locations within the Lake District that trigger my personal memories of my Grandpa, I am creating conceptual photographs that document something which is invisible (the past memories of my Grandpa)

 

The Audio:

  • As suggested above, although I have narrowed down my research relating to Melanie Friend’s work into these three specific project (“Border Country”, “The Guide”, and “Homes And Gardens”) for this piece of research I have decided to look through each of these projects and briefly reflect on the generalized, audio aspects that can be applied to them all (rather than focusing on the individual projects and the accompanying photographs)
  • When listening to the accompanying audio associated with the photographs from each of the projects, I soon found that the main piece of audio which was included was that of recorded, personal interviews
    • Now, these tended to be juxtaposed with the images in order to, usually, enhance the narrative captured by the photograph but, on numerous occasions, the audio included often provided the viewer with a contrasting narrative compared to that which was documented within the image, thus creating a more engaging project through the “unsuspected” contrasting narrative
    • These particular recorded interviews also tended to provide the viewer with a personal perspective associated with the narrative portrayed within the project which, through the use of the voice as an emotional tool, also creates a more engaging piece
    • These two reflected aspects (including the juxtaposition and the personal perspective) therefore offers the viewers with a greater contextualized understanding to the photograph which, similar to research I have suggested above regarding the use of accompanying text, creates a more dense narrative, increasing the audiences understanding and accessibility to the project
  • Finally, when listening to the accompanying audio associated with the photographs from each of the projects, I also noticed that Friend had decided to include ambient noises within her projects
    • These particular ambient noises tended to mirror those that would be associated with the subject that was portrayed in the photograph which, through providing both visual and audio information for the viewer, creating a more realistic representation of the documented place, therefore creating a more immersive piece
    • This, in turn, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the project, as well as their personal relationship to it (through their now triggered associative imagination), which therefore enhances their accessibility

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into Melanie Friend’s works (including “Border Country”, “The Guide”, and “Homes and Gardens”), although it seems that this piece of research may be lacking in quantity compared to some of my other resources, this is simply because, as suggested above, I wanted to focus my research on the piece of audio rather than the accompanying photograph, and I have therefore found a number of different auditory aspects that I thought I could relate to my FMP (because, as suggested above, I am planning on experimenting with the incorporation of accompanying audio within my final exhibition piece)
  • Similar to some of the research that I have gained in relation to accompanying text, the main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from Friend’s work is the inclusion of a considered (generalized) use of audio (including the type of audio included) which, as previously stated, enhances the viewers engagement and immersion with the project, creating a greater contextualized understanding of the subject depicted, thus increasing the viewer’s accessibility
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs and text, I could therefore experiment with the type of my accompanying audio within my FMP, in order to enhance some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • With this being said, this piece of research has therefore provided me with relatively specific information and inspiration that I could incorporate into the audio experiments that I am planning on conducting throughout the developmental stages of my project, which as suggested throughout my FMP development, include both ambient noises of the significant places I revisit within the Lake District, as well as an oral interview with my Dad discussing the memories that we recall in association to each of the places

 



VIDEO:

 

Patrick Keiller (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Patrick Keiller

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look at the work of this particular individual as he created very “static” videos in order to depict different (urban) landscapes, which Anthony thought could relate to the photographic technique I have used within my photographs (and therefore wanted me to experiment with the use of video)
  • After conducting some brief research into Keiller’s work, I was soon able to identify two specific projects that I thought related greatly to my FMP over some of his other works and, as suggested above, these were “London Polling Day 1992” and “Robinson in Space” (please note, however, that I was only able to gain exerts from the pieces that lasted approximately four minutes)
  • Now, similar to the research I conducted regarding the work of Melanie Friend, in order to save myself some time with regards to the research, although I have identified these two projects as being the most relevant to my FMP, for this piece of research I have decided to look through each of these videos and briefly reflect on generalized aspects that can be applied to them both (rather than conducting in-depth research into each of them)
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to reflect upon the concept that Keiller explored throughout his projects (which includes information from descriptions accompanying the exerts – embedded above), as well as his general use of video to document a particular landscape, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (in relation to the use of video, as an experiment or within my final exhibition piece):

 

“London Polling Day 1992” –

 

“Robinson in Space” –

 

The Concept:

  • After reading through the descriptions that accompanied these exerts, I was able to gain information surrounding Patrick Keiller’s preferred concepts to explore throughout each of the identified projects
  • Within these pieces of text it suggested that Keiller has created a video travelogue of England, that redefines the documentary format through his use of both static, composed shots (including historic landmarks, suburban malls, industrial parks, factories, etc.), as well as his used of dry humour introduced by the off-screen narrator (Paul Scofield)
  • Within these videos Keiller depicts the relationship between both the narrator and his friend “Robinson” who travels, explores and examines the country of England with him
  • These videos therefore discuss (slightly outdated) generalized themes and concepts relating to the changing landscape throughout England
  • Now, although when initially looking at the particular concepts Patrick Keiller explores they don’t appear to relate to my FMP, I feel that there is a very (very) slight similarity between his and my work through the fact that we are both documenting different landscapes within England
  • However, as I feel that this conceptual similarity is not enough to provide me with inspiration for my FMP, I therefore hope that my following reflections regarding some of the more generalize aspects included within the video’s could provide me with more relevant inspiration

 

The Video’s:

  • As suggested above, although I have narrowed down my research relating to Patrick Keiller’s work into these two specific projects (“London Polling Day 1992” and “Robinson In Space”), for this piece of research I have decided to look through each of these projects and briefly reflect on the generalized, video aspects that can be applied to both of them (rather than focusing on the individual aspects within each project)
  • Throughout both of these videos, as suggested above, Keiller has created a travelogue that focuses on the (personal) documentation of varying landscapes (and events) found throughout England
  • Bearing this in mind, in relation to the visual features of the videos, as suggested above, Keiller uses a unique, “static” style of videography that includes careful compositions depicting the varying landscapes discussed, whilst also incorporating moving aspects within the shots through the capturing of mundane activities (such as cars and people)
    • Each of these carefully composed shots therefore depict aspects of the landscape that are important to the narrated story (discussed in further detail below), and usually vary from long-shots to close-ups in order to focus the viewers attention on the main aspect that is relevant to the narrative
      • Also, within each of the sections of the video (discussed in more detail below) there are usually only two or three shots that are constantly re-used (at different sections of the filmed footage) that cut back from one another, which can be used by the viewer to enhance the importance of the (mundane) landscape that is being constantly displayed
    • However, some of the shots used within these videos, although they still depict the main aspects of the landscapes that are being discussed, can be used to symbolize some of the deeper aspects associated with the accompanying narrative through their varying aesthetics – for example, in “Robinson in Space” a more voyeuristic shot is used when discussing the ideologies of a spy
    • Finally, in relation to the visual features of the video, as suggested above, these films have been split into sections which discuss a slightly altered narrative surrounding the same overarching theme (much like chapters in a book), and these have been symbolized by the incorporation of black “cuts” – this is obviously used by the viewer to suggest the next section of the video, preparing them for a slight change in narrative
  • Now, in relation to the audio features of the videos, these tend to include a combination of narration, ambient noises, music and silence
    • With regards to the narration that is included throughout these videos (with the voice of Paul Scofield), as suggested above, these often incorporate a humorous aspect in relation to the more serious themes explored throughout the video
      • Used to describe the relevance of the landscape depicted (including both historical and literary context), this narration also incorporates a personal perspective on the generalized themes discussed throughout the project
      • Both of these aspects (the use of descriptive and personal narration) therefore allows the viewers to gain a historical, literary and personal contextualization of the themes and the landscapes depicted, which provides them with increased accessibility to the project
    • The audio of these videos also incorporate ambient noises that (as suggested in my research into Melanie Friend above) tendto mirror those that would be associated with the landscape subject that was portrayed within the video, which, through providing both visual and audio information for the viewer, creates a more realistic representation of the documented place, therefore enhancing the viewer’s immersion
      • This, in turn, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the project, which therefore enhances their accessibility
    • Music is also used as an audio aspect throughout these films and often symbolize the more creative description associated with stories or dreams that the narrator has been told about (rather than the literal reality which is depicted by the ambient noises, as suggested above)
    • Finally, with regards to audio features that have been included within these videos, Keiller also uses silence in the background of the narration in order to focus the viewer’s attention on the information that is being spoken, thus enhancing its importance in relation to the overall narrative of the video
  • Also, although this may appear to be a minor detail in comparison to the features that I have reflected on above, the aesthetics of the video and the style of the narration (including it’s content and the voice used) can be used to enhance the age of the video, which can be used by the viewer to gain further contextualized understanding surrounding the topic portrayed
  • Finally, although both of these main features (the visual and the audio) may seem “weak” when viewed on their own, as discussed in some of my previous research, when combined they have the capability to increase the density of the narrative, enhancing the viewers contextualized understanding surrounding the project, and therefore increasing their accessibility

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into Patrick Keiller’s works (including “London Polling Day 1992” and “Robinson in Space”), I have found a number of different video aspects that I thought I could relate to my FMP (because, as discussed above, Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the use of video throughout the developmental stages of my FMP)
  • Now, although I personally don’t feel that the overall examples of video’s that I reflected upon above would provide me with a successful technique to experiment with in relation to my developmental videos, there are some individual aspects that I feel I will consider including
    • As suggested above, Anthony not only suggested that I research into Keiller’s work due to the fact that he uses video as his main display option, but he also suggested his work as he thought he could see a similar “static” feel between both his work and the photographs that I had created for my FMP
      • Bearing this in mind, within the experimentation with the use of video, I will therefore attempt to incorporate a number of carefully composed, static shots (that often incorporate mundane movement)
    • Also, another aspect of the video that I feel may be relevant to consider for my FMP video experimentation is the use of black “cuts” to symbolize the next section of displayed narrative
      • In relation to my FMP, this could therefore be incorporated within these videos in order to provide the viewer with a visual clue surrounding the transition from one of the locations (and the memories depicted), to another
  •  Finally, similar to the inspiration that I gained from Melanie Friend’s work (discussed above) another piece of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this section of research is the inclusion of a considered (generalized) use of audio (including the type of audio included) which, as previously stated, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the subject depicted throughout the project, thus increasing their accessibility
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs and text, I could therefore experiment with the type of my accompanying audio within my FMP, in order to enhance some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • With this being said, this piece of research has therefore provided me with relatively specific information and inspiration, relating to audio, that I could incorporate into the video experiments that I am planning on conducting throughout the developmental stages of my project (which as suggested throughout my FMP development, include both ambient noises of the significant places I revisit within the Lake District, as well as an oral interview with my Dad discussing the memories that we recall in association to each of the places)

 


 

Jane and Louise Wilson (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Jane and Louise Wilson

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look at the work of these particular individuals as they also experiment with the use of video to depict different (urban) landscapes, which Anthony wanted me to experiment with the use of video throughout my FMP development
  • After conducting some brief research into the Wilson’s work, I was actually unable to find any “artistic” videos that they had created as a project, but I was soon able to identify another specific, documentary video (that depicted one of their projects in association to a particular landscape) that I thought could relate to my FMP through the videography used in relation to the depiction of the landscape, and, as suggested above, this was the “Blind Landing – Trust New Art at Orford Ness” video
    • With this being said, although I have only been able to find one relatively relevant documentary video for this piece of research, I have still decided that I am going to focus this research on some of the general features included within the video, rather than more specific aspects such as the aesthetics of singular shots
  • As you will see below, I have therefore decided to reflect upon the concept that the Wilson’s explored throughout the project depicted within the video (which includes information from the description accompanying the video – embedded above), as well as their general use of video to document a particular landscape, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (in relation to the use of video as an experiment, or within my final exhibition piece):

 

 

The Concept:

  • After reading through the description that accompanied this piece of work, I was able to gain information surrounding Jane and Louise Wilson’s concepts that they explored throughout their project
  • Within this piece of accompanying text, it suggested that the “Blind Landing – Trust New Art at Orford Ness” video was commissioned by the National Trust in order to present the Wilson’s project which showed a visual representation depicting the unique experiences (including the complex landscape, ecology, and historical significance), regarding the Blind Landing Experimental Unit (that was operational during the cold war), to existing and new audiences
  • This piece of text then goes on to discuss the fact that, through the creation of this promotional video, the Wilson’s had to actively curate the site (for their project) within a contemporary, cultural context
  • Now, although when looking at this particular concept it doesn’t appear to relate to my FMP, I feel that there is a slight similarity between theirs and my work through the fact that we are both experimenting with the representation of diff different landscapes, to new and existing audiences
    • What I mean by this is that, throughout my project I am obviously going to be documenting significant landscapes within the Lake District (which may have been experienced by a number of my audience members – the “existing” audience), but I am attempting to show these landscapes in a conceptual manner through using them to represent my personal memories (which could be used to bring in a wider, “new” audience with regards to the Lake District)

 

The Video:

  • As suggested above, although I only need to look at one video, of Jane and Louise Wilson’s project, for this piece of research, I have still decided that I am going to focus this research on some of the general features included within the video (rather than more specific aspects such as the aesthetics of the images)
  • Bearing this in mind, in relation to the visual features of the video, it has incorporated a wide range of different shots including long-shots, close-ups of more specific details, as well as a double portrait showing the two artists being interviewed, and shots portraying the process of the development throughout the Wilson’s project
    • With regards to the long-shots and close-ups that have been used throughout the video, these usually depict the landscape from differing perspectives: capturing a large majority of the landscape in order to represent the vastness and abandonment of the location, as well as specific details to enhance the uniqueness of the landscape (that were both aspects that the Wilson’s focused on throughout the creation of their project)
      • Some of the shots used throughout the video have also been carefully considered, in terms of aesthetics, in order to elicit a specific atmosphere which can be used as a reference to the atmosphere felt when visiting this particular abandoned place
      • These varying shots therefore provide the viewer with greater visual information, which offers them an enhanced contextualized understanding surrounding the uniqueness and the experience (the main concept behind the Wilson’s project), which therefore increases their accessibility
    • However, in relation to the inclusion of the double-portrait shot that depicts an interview with the Wilson’s discussing the stages of the projects creation, as well as the shots portraying the process of the projects development, these obviously place this particular location in contemporary context (as suggested in “The Concept” section above), which not only allows the viewer to gain an understanding regarding the landscape itself, but also, obviously, provides the viewer with a contextualized understanding surrounding the creation of the project
    • Finally, in relation to the visual features of the video, differing from Patrick Keiller’s work (researched into above), this video tends to incorporate both “static” video compositions as well as filming motions (such as pans and zooms)
      • These have obviously been carefully considered depending on the subject that the shot is depicting at the time (in order to draw the viewer’s attention to the main section of the landscape that is currently being discussed), but it also enhances the contemporary aspect of the project depicted, which can be used by the viewer to gain a contextualized understanding surrounding the subject of the project, thus increasing their accessibility
      • Also, please note, in relation to the cuts that have been used throughout these films, differing from the work of Patrick Keiller, this video has incorporated the use of simple cuts, which allows the viewer to experience the whole of the landscape being displayed (rather than a decreased duration of viewing through the use of an extended fade)
  •  Now, in relation to the audio features of the video, these tend to include a combination of narration, ambient noises, and music
    • With regards to the narration that is included throughout these videos (taken from an interview with both Jane and Louise Wilson, that has also been displayed visually on occasion), this tends to discuss personal perspectives and opinions, as well as descriptive experiences, that they have associated with this place
      • Throughout this narrated interview, both of the Wilson’s also take time to discuss the project that they have created in relation to this particular place, including the personal thought process behind its creation
      • Similar to the work of Patrick Keiller, both of these aspects (the use of descriptive and personal narration) therefore allows the viewers to gain a an understanding regarding the contextualization of the themes, landscapes and projects depicted, which provides them with increased accessibility to the video
    • Once again, similar to the work of Patrick Keiller, the audio of this video also incorporates ambient noises which (as suggested in my research into Melanie Friend above) tendto mirror those that would be associated with the landscape subject that was portrayed within the video, which, through providing both visual and audio information for the viewer, creates a more realistic representation of the documented place, therefore enhancing the pieces immersion
      • This, in turn, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the video (and the project), which therefore enhances their accessibility
    • Finally, with regards to audio features that have been included within this video, eerie music is also used as an audio aspect throughout this film, which has been used to enhance the atmosphere associated with the abandoned landscape depicted, thus increasing the viewers understanding in relation to the landscape
  • Finally, as suggested in Patrick Keiller’s research above, although both of these main features (the visual and the audio) may seem “weak” when viewed on their own, as discussed in some of my previous research, when combined they have the capability to increase the density of the narrative, enhancing the viewers contextualized understanding surrounding the video, and therefore increasing their accessibility

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After conducting this research into the “Blind Landing – Trust New Art at Orford Ness” video with Jane and Lousie Wilson, I have found a number of different video aspects that I thought I could relate to my FMP (because, as discussed above, Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the use of video throughout the developmental stages of my FMP)
  • Also, differing slightly from the inspiration that I gained from Patrick Keiller, researching into this video has therefore provided me with more contemporary visual (and auditory) examples, in relation to videography, which I could therefore attempt to incorporate within my video experiment, that was suggested by Anthony Luvera, throughout the development of my FMP
  • Finally, similar to the inspiration that I gained from both Melanie Friend and Patrick Keiller’s work (discussed above) another piece of inspiration that I am planning on taking away from this section of research is the inclusion of a considered (generalized) use of audio (including the type of audio included) which, as previously stated, enhances the viewers contextualized understanding of the subject depicted throughout the project, thus increasing their accessibility
    • As suggested in previous research, similar to the use of aesthetics within my photographs and text, I could therefore experiment with the type of my accompanying audio within my FMP, in order to enhance some of the concepts or themes explored throughout my project
      • With this being said, this piece of research has therefore provided me with relatively specific information and inspiration, relating to audio, that I could incorporate into the video experiments that I am planning on conducting throughout the developmental stages of my project (which as suggested throughout my FMP development, include both ambient noises of the significant places I revisit within the Lake District, as well as an oral interview with my Dad discussing the memories that we recall in association to each of the places)
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