352MC Fourth Trip to the Lake District (Thursday 12th March – Saturday 14th March 2015)

On Thursday 12th March 2015, I travelled up to the Lake District with my Mum, for my fourth weekend trip. Similar to the previous trip up to the Lake District (please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), deviating away from my original plan of completing this project with my Dad he was unfortunately able to make this weekend which meant that, once again, Mum kindly decided to take me up so that I didn’t waste any precious time shooting on location. (Unfortunately though, I had to leave the Lake District on the Saturday, at midday, as I had a previously arranged personal commitment to attend to, which could not be missed. However, as we went up on the Thursday morning, I was still able to take part in three days worth of shooting). As with the previous trips, below you will be able to find information regarding the weather for the weekend (researched prior to departure), the original plan for the weekend (including a brief introduction to the plan, the equipment I took with me, the locations I wanted to visit, and a rough idea of the shots I wanted to take), whether the plan for the weekend changed (and the reasons why it changed), notes that I took about the project that I thought of during the weekend whilst also discussing them with my Mum (which have been split into “general” and “technical” notes), a contact sheet of the photographs that I took over the weekend (from both the Canon 5D Mk II and the Mamiya 7), and, finally, a reflection on the images and the trip:

 


 

Weather:

Trip 4 Weather

 


 

Plan for the Weekend:

The plan for this weekend was essentially exactly the same as the previous trip to the Lake District (as already stated, please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”): where I wanted to create aesthetically pleasing landscape images (that also had a documentary aesthetic) of a number of different paths that I have walked with my Grandpa in the past (as a way of enhancing the reconnecting aspect of the project, as suggested by David Moore – please see the blog post “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 3 (Practitioner Talk and a Group Tutorial with David Moore, and a Self-Learning Workshop)”), through the use of a particular “middle-of-the-road” composition (for more information, please see “Planned Shots” below).

However, deviating away from my previous trips, although primarily focusing on the controlled “middle-of-the-road” aesthetic, I also used this weekend as an opportunity to briefly experiment with a more “loosely controlled methodology” (as suggested by Anthony Luvera in a one-to-one session on 11th March – please see the blog post “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”), as well as capturing video and audio of ambient noises in order to allow me to experiment with creating videos, cinemagraphs and immersive soundscapes later in my development (all of which where either suggested in my varying proposal drafts, or that have been suggested in numerous feedback sessions – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 6 (Practitioner Talk and a Group Tutorial with David Rule, and a One-to-One Tutorial with Caroline Molloy)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” – these future experiments will be shown in blog posts that have the word “Experiment” in their title).

 

Technical Equipment (and Methodology):

  • Canon 5D Mk II (with charger and 32GB Compact Flash Card)
  • Tamron SP10-24mm (wide angle) lens
  • Canon EF 24-105mm lens – to be used to capture the experimental video aspects of the trip (including cinemagraphs) as it is a slightly more appropriate lens and focal length for this particular (video) medium
  • Mamiya 7
  • Mamiya 7 80mm lens
  • Fuji Pro 400 H Colour Film (ISO 400)
  • 77mm Ultra-Violet Filter (for the Tamron SP10-24mm lens)
  • 58mm Ultra-Violet Filter (for the Mamiya 7 80mm lens)
  • Tripod
  • Edirol R09 (and Microphone) – in order to capture the ambient noises that I will consider using within future soundscape, video, and cinemagraph experimentations
  • Kenneth Cole Reaction Instant 600 Polaroid Camera – to be used to capture the collaborative methodology behind the project (as suggested in both versions of my proposal – please see the blog posts entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”)
  • PX680 Impossible Project 600 Colour Polaroid Film
  • Sekonic L-308S Flashmate (light meter) (with spare batteries)
  • Low-Pro Waterproof Camera Bag
  • Measuring Tape – in order to measure where the centre of the path is so that I can make sure that the lens of the Mamiya 7 (rather than the body) is situated in the correct position for the “middle-of-the-road” composition

Also in regards to the methodology behind the use of equipment, similar to the previous trip up to the Lake District, I spent the majority of the weekend shooting on the Canon 5D Mk II in order to gain appropriate settings and compositions, as well as digital “back-ups” of my images before moving on to capturing a finalized “official” photograph on the Mamiya 7.

However, in regards to the experimental aspects of the weekend (including using a more “loosely controlled methodology”, and capturing data for video, cinemagraphs and ambient soundscapes), I obviously used the Canon 5D Mk II (and Edirol R09), due to the fact that it not only saved precious film, but also because videos, cinemagraphs and audio could only be recorded digitally. Also, in regards to the equipment methodology for capturing the experimental video and cinemagraph data, the use of a tripod was imperative in order to achieve the “static style” that was suggested by Anthony (please see the blog post “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”), as well as the fact that, in order to create a successful cinemagraph in postproduction, you need to capture both a video and a photograph in the exact same place (hence the major importance of using a tripod).

 

Locations:

Whilst considering the locations to visit on this trip up to the Lake District, similar to the previous trip I embarked on with my Mum, I obviously had to take into account the fact that she was slightly less fit than my Dad. However, fortunately, when looking over my finalized list of locations (created on the previous trip – please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”) most of the locations that I wanted to revisit during this weekend weren’t considered challenging climbs. This therefore meant that I was able to choose the locations that I needed to visit for my FMP, without the choice being affected by the fitness of my Mum.

The plan that I came up with for this weekend can therefore be found below underneath the day that I planned on visiting them, along with any notes that I feel are relevant to include:

 

Day One (Thursday 12th March 2015):

  • On the first day, we got up to the Lake District slightly later than we did on the first two trips, as Mum said that she didn’t really have the energy to go up to the Lake District ridiculously early like I do with my Dad
    • However, as we were essentially spending an extra day in the Lake District than I usually did, we thought that going up slightly later on the Thursday wouldn’t be much of a problem
  • Buttermere
  • Loughrigg Tarn

 

Day Two (Friday 13th March 2015):

  • Haystacks OR The Langdales (up to Stickle Tarn)
    • Dependent on the weather – if it is nice weather, I plan on going up Haystacks in order to capture some final “official” shot on the Mamiya 7; but if it is bad weather, I plan on going up to Stickle Tarn in The Langdales, in order to scout for locations as a way of making the most of my time in the Lake District

 

Day Three (half of Saturday 14th March 2015):

  • Surprise View
  • Latrigg

 

Planned Shots:

This weekend trip was the first weekend where I was using the newly tested middle, “middle-of-the-road” composition that I experimented with (please the blog post “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Test-Shoot Two (“Middle-of-the-Road” Compositional Technique with the Mamiya 7)”) as, after the previous trip to the Lake District, I soon noticed that the path images were slightly off centre due to the rangefinder aspect of the Mamiya 7.

In regards to the methodology that I used over the weekend, as briefly stated above, the use of equipment remained practically the same (where I took the photographs on the Canon 5D Mk II first to gain the correct settings and “back-up” images, before finalizing “official” photographs on the Mamiya 7, as well as capturing general aesthetically pleasing landscape photographs on the Canon 5D Mk II to provide me with another form of “back-up” imagery in case the projects progression required it in the future).

However, as this weekend also provided me with the opportunity to experiment with a more “loosely controlled methodology”, as well as video and cinemagraphs (all of which were shot on the Canon 5D Mk II in order to save film and the fact that the latter two needed to be shot digitally, as suggested above), I obviously varied the photographic methodology depending on the technique I was using.

Please note, as I knew that they were only experiments, I obviously spent more time focusing on the main aspects of my project (the “middle-of-the-road” photographs) and therefore spent less time capturing these pieces of data. However, if I do decide on using these techniques for my FMP piece, I will obviously return to the places to spend more time on the capturing and creating.

In relation to the more relaxed shooting style or “loosely controlled methodology”, I simply decided to capture images of landscapes that I thought were aesthetically pleasing as, like stated in the previous paragraph, this would provide me with a form of “back-up” imagery in case the projects progression required it in the future. In regards to the video experimentations I simply decided to capture a variety of aesthetically pleasing and interesting natural places, formations, and processes, using a “static style” (as suggested by Anthony – please see the blog post “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”) through the use of a tripod, as well as excluding filming movement such as zooming and panning. (Please note, I decided to use this particular methodology as I was able to gain slight inspiration by briefly looking at the videos of Patrick Keiller that was suggested in the same one-to-one with Anthony Luvera – in order to see more in-depth research surround this particular artist, please see my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post – and during the actual creation of the experimental video, I also plan on using similar editing techniques to those used by Patrick Keiller). For the cinemagraph aspect of experimentation, I decided to choose aesthetically pleasing landscape locations (including some of the paths that I was photographing for my “official” shots) that provided me slight movement, which could be isolated within the final cinemagraph outcome that I create.

As for the audio, although they are not necessarily “shots” I decided to record ambient noises provided by some of the locations where I took the “official” Mamiya photographs (so that the audio could possibly be paired with the images to create a more immersive piece, as suggested in both versions of my proposal – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”), the locations used within the video and cinemagraph experimentations (so that the audio can be paired with the visual data collected), as well as general natural noises that I though were beautiful and intriguing to listen to (as I thought it was better to collect more data than was required in case I decide to use it in the future progression of my project).

 


 

Changed Plan:

Unfortunately, for a number of different reasons, the plan for this weekend did end up changing. Below you will be able to find the changed plan along with reasons and information as to why it changed (which can be found in italics):

 

Day One (Thursday 12th March 2015):

  • Buttermere
    • We decided to go to Buttermere first (before Loughrigg Tarn) as, because it was the furthest away and would take a lot longer to complete, it would save us time in the logistics of the day, allowing us to have more light in both of the planned locations
    • Unfortunately, however, it was incredibly horrid weather (torrential rain and gusts of strong wind), which meant that, although I persisted with taking numerous photographs, as well as some videos and ambient noise recordings, (similar to the first and third trips up to the Lake District – see the blog posts “First Trip to the Lake District (Saturday18th – Sunday 19th October 2014)” and “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), I didn’t take as much as I wanted to as I didn’t want to risk damaging the equipment, and those that I did take weren’t of a very good aesthetic quality due to the weather (meaning that I will most likely have to revisit the location in the future) – this therefore meant that I also didn’t get to experiment with the “loosely controlled methodology” that I wanted to try
    • However, rather than wasting my time on location, I instead decided to scout for possible shots for future visits (seen on the Canon 5D Mk II Contact Sheet), so that, when I turn up to the location in the future, I will know exactly where I want to set up and shoot (which will hopefully allow me to spend less time in this particular location so that I can move on to the others)
      • I did however manage to take one “official” shot on the Mamiya 7, but didn’t want to waste my film at the other locations as I knew that the aesthetics provided by the weather were not worth “officially” photographing, and it was also very difficult to shoot as most of the shots that I scouted were facing the direction that the rain was coming down (meaning that the lens was covered in raindrops in a matter of seconds)
    • In regards to Loughrigg Tarn, because of the ridiculously poor weather, the fact that once we had got back to the car the light (that was already relatively poor) was already starting to fade, and the fact that I have already undergone a location scout at Loughrigg Tarn (meaning that I know exactly where I want to shoot when the weather is better) we decided not to travel to this location and instead try to fit it in on a different day
    • However, to make the most of my time, I knew that I wanted to experiment with Todd Hido’s technique (of photographing blurred landscapes by capturing them through a car window with water droplets on it), so on the way back to the Youth Hostel, I thought that it would be a good idea to try it out
      • Unfortunately, the lens that I wanted to use for the experimentation (the Canon EF 24-105mm lens) actually managed to experience some water damage whilst in my “waterproof” camera bag, which resulted in the accumulation of condensation within the lens meaning that the photographs (that can be seen in the Canon 5D Mk II Contact Sheet) were obviously incredibly hazy
        • I obviously spent time trying to dry out the lens overnight, especially considering that it was on loan from the MLS!
  • Thursday Evening
    • On Thursday evening, I then thought that it would be a good idea to think of a possible Plan B, in case the weather persisted in this horrible manner, so that I could make the most out of my weekend
    • I therefore decided that if it was sunny, I would obviously stick to the plan of visiting Haystacks in order to capture my final “official” shots, but if it was rainy, to visit Loughrigg Tarn (as we didn’t get to visit it today, and it would also allow me the opportunity to experiment with video and audio), Stickle Tarn in The Langdales (to spend time location scouting), and using the time where we travel between each location to experiment with Todd Hido’s technique

 

Day Two (Friday 13th March 2015):

  • When I woke up on the Friday morning, although it wasn’t raining, it was still very cloudy and relatively foggy (with snow on the peaks), which meant that I decided to stick with a slightly altered version of the Plan B I came up with the following evening (shown above) as I knew that Haystacks would have very low visibility
    • Stickle Tarn in The Langdales – for location scouting, which would allow me to spend less time there in the future as I will simply be able to walk to the chosen locations and take the shot before moving on
    • Loughrigg Tarn – to get final “official” shots on the Mamiya 7 as the weather was due to clear up in the late afternoon
    • No Todd Hido technique – as there was no rain (and the fact that the lens I wanted to use for the experimentation was still water damaged) I was therefore unable to experiment with Todd Hido’s raindrop technique; however as this was the case, I have actually come up with a plan that will allow me to create the technique (using a glass plate and a bottle of water) which will allow me to experiment with the technique back at home, even when it’s not raining
  • Stickle Tarn in The Langdales
    • When I arrived at the car park for the Langdales, I decided that I wanted to walk up to Stickle Tarn to scout for the locations of the “official” shots, but as it was due to brighten up towards the middle of the afternoon, to actually stop to take the “official” photographs in the scouted locations on the way back down
    • Unfortunately, however, it didn’t brighten up as much as we had hoped (i.e. it was still very cloudy), but I decided to capture some “official” shots anyway in case the conditions translated differently on film
    • I also decided to use this opportunity to experiment with collecting data in regards to the “static” video and ambient noises that I am later planning on using in different experiments (briefly discussed above)
      • Unfortunately, however, as suggested previously, the Canon lens that I wanted to use for the video experimentation was still suffering from condensation which meant that I couldn’t use it for my videos – however, I deeded to use my wide-angle Tamron lens as I knew that I was only capturing this visual data as a part of an experiment (but if I do decide to use this technique for my FMP, I will obviously use the correct lenses)
  •  Loughrigg Tarn
    • At Loughrigg Tarn, as previously stated, I decided that I wanted to try and capture the “official” shots (as I already knew the locations I wanted to shoot from after conducing a location scout on my previous trip – please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”
      • However, whilst revisiting these scouted locations at Loughrigg Tarn, there was one previously scouted location that I decided I didn’t want to use as the path within the frame had changed dramatically since the previous trip (i.e. it now simply looked like a standard field without any indication of a path running through it)
    • Unfortunately though, as suggested above when discussing Stickle Tarn in The Langdales, the weather didn’t brighten up as much as we had hoped (i.e. it was still very cloudy), and although I decided to still take some “official” photographs (in case the conditions translated differently on film), I don’t think that these particular shots will turn out very successfully
    • I also decided to experiment with both video and audio, using the exact same methodology that I used in The Langdales
  • Friday Evening
    • On Friday evening, I thought about my plan for the following day (Surprise View and Latrigg) and decided that, as the weather was meant to be very nice, that I should stick with this plan

 

Day Three (Saturday 14th March 2015):

  • On the Saturday, as suggested above, I decided to stick with the original plan of visiting Surprise View and Latrigg
    • Unfortunately, however, the weather was not as nice as it was forecast (cloudy with very rare intervals of sun) which meant that it greatly affected the shots I was planning on capturing throughout the day, as well as affecting the days timed schedule (as I had to leave at around about lunchtime to attend a previously arranged personal commitment – more details have been include above)
  • Surprise View
    • When we were at Surprise View, we ended up staying there a lot longer than expected as we had to wait for long periods of time to try and capture my images during the very rare sunny intervals
    • However, as this soon started to cut into the time that I would have up Latrigg to create my photos, I soon decided to leave trying to capture my photographs within the sunny intervals (resulting in creating the landscape images within cloudy and dull conditions) as I knew that no sun was expected in this particular area for hours
      • With this being said, I obviously didn’t make the decision without knowing full well that it was an incredibly easy place to get to, and that, dependent on the weather, it would be incredibly easy and quick for me to capture my desired photographs (as I know the exact locations and time of day that would best suit the photos)
  •  Latrigg
    • When I went up Latrigg, I initially decided that I only really wanted to spend time scouting for locations, due to the fact that weather was different from what I had originally expected
    • However, I soon realized that the cloudy weather was actually creating some interesting hazy conditions in this particular area, so I therefore decided to take some “official” shots on the Mamiya as I was interested to see how they would translate on film
    • In relation to the video and audio experiments, as I was relatively pushed for time today (due to having to head off to get to another personal commitment) I decided to focus my attention solely on the photography side of the project (so the “middle-of-the-road” and slightly more “loosely controlled” photographic methodologies) rather than the video and the audio experimentations (although I still managed to capture a couple of these)
      • For the video that I created on this day, I still had to use my wide-angle Tamron lens as the Canon lens I wanted to use for the experiment was still water damaged at this point in time – it’s all fixed now though!

 


 

Notes from the Weekend:

Technical

Video Experiment

  • As you have seen, over the weekend, I attempted to capture some varying “static” video that I will later be able to use within a video experimentation
  • Unfortunately, as you have also seen, the lens that I wanted to use for this particular video experiment (the Canon EF 24-105mm as it is a slightly more appropriate lens and focal length for this particular (video) medium) attained water damage on the first day which meant that I had to adjust my plan and use my Tamron SP10-24mm (wide angle) lens – which as stated above, I felt didn’t really matter as it was only being used for an experiment
  • Bearing this idea in mind, it also meant that some of the videos I took on the weekend varied from my original plan of using a tripod to gain this “static style” as it provided me with extra hassle which cut into the time for the more important aspects of the trip (like capturing the “official” photographs of the landscapes) – however, as stated above, once again, due to the fact that it was an experiment, I felt like it didn’t really matter that much and I still tried to use a “static” approach to the hand-held videos that I captured (still excluding filming movement like panning and zooming)
  • With this being said, however, like suggested previously, if I do decide to use the video technique for my FMP, I will obviously take the time to revisit my particular locations and capture the video in a professional manner with the correct equipment

Ambient Noise Audio Recording

  • As you have seen, over the weekend, I also attempted to capture some varying ambient noises in order to allow me to experiment with the use of it in future videos or the creation of different soundscapes
  • Although I have used this piece of equipment a number of times in the past, I was relatively unsure as to how to use it in the landscape conditions that I was trying to record
  • This therefore meant that I ended up encountering a number of different problems with it whilst on this trip up to the Lake District:
    • Unfortunately, although I know that the peak levels of the audio recording had to be somewhere between 12 and 20, I adjusted the input settings accordingly so that the levels fitted in this particular range
      • However, as I was unsure as to how to make sure that the peak of the audio was in a constant position within this range in different recordings, the audio may vary in volume and quality, but I know that this can be edited in post production if required
    • Also, as the Lake District is known as a very windy and rainy place, I soon found that it was really difficult to capture these particular sounds in a natural way
      • For example, when recording, the Edirol would obviously pick up any water droplets that hit the microphone (which created incredibly loud “bangs” in the audio), and, when I tried to cover the Microphone in order to shield it from the water droplets, it was so sensitive that it could pick up the water droplets that were hitting my waterproof coat and trousers – and I obviously didn’t want to just leave it out under shelter in the rain for fear of it obtaining water damage when it was on loan from the MLS!
      • Also, in regards to the wind, it obviously picked up any amount of wind movement which greatly affected the quality of the audio, which therefore made it really difficult for me to record ambient noises in some of the hilltop locations – however, I am planning on talking to a technician at University to see if there is a way of preventing this
      • I also decided to use the built in microphone on the Edirol recorder (as I didn’t want any of the other equipment that came with it, including the hand held recorder, to attain water damage) which may have been one of the reasons why I was encountering this particular problem, but as suggested above, I am planning on talking to a technician at University to see if there is a way of preventing this

 


 

Photos – Contact Sheets (Canon 5D Mk II and Mamiya 7 (x4)):

Digital Contact Sheet:

Fourth Trip to the Lake District – Canon 5D Mk II Contact Sheet

 

Film Contact Sheets:

Fourth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 1

Fourth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 2

Fourth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 3

Fourth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 4

 

Please note, although I used this weekend to capture different experimental aspects, such as videos and ambient noises, these will be displayed below under the appropriate experimental sections that will discuss the methodology and output (including videos and cinemagraphs) that I created during the process of experimentation.

 

Developing and Editing:

In regards to the developing and editing of the images, this methodology remained exactly the same to the previous weekend (please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), and so, to jog your memory, I have therefore just included the key aspects below in a bullet point format (please note, any slight changes are represented in italics):

Canon 5D Mk II

  • Similar to the first trip (see in the blog post “First Trip to the Lake District (Saturday18th – Sunday 19th October 2014)”, under the section “Photos”, “Editing”)
  • Shot in RAW format (as a way of capturing as much visual information as possible)
  • Didn’t edit them (or remove any photographs) and simply created a contact sheet from the original files

Mamiya 7

  • Shot on colour film – sent them off to a specialist company to be developed (as we don’t have colour processing equipment within the university)
  • Scanned them in university using the Hassleblad scanner (so that I could create a digital contact sheet of the photographs, allowing me to compare them to the digital contact sheets I created for the Canon 5D Mk II images)
  • Opened them in Photoshop for brief editing to create a relatively “correct” image, including:
    • Straightening
    • Cropping
    • Inverting (into a positive)
    • Automatically adjusting the:
      • Tone
      • Colour
      • Contrast
      • Levels
  • However, these edited images are still far from perfect (including the fact that the colour is still slightly off, the contrast is incredibly low, and the images appear overexposed) and so, if I decide that these images may be useful for my final exhibition piece in the future, I will take time looking through each of the images and selecting the stronger contenders, before appropriately editing them to a higher standard or sending them of for professional scanning and printing

 


 

Reflection – The Photographs and The Trip:

The Photographs:

As you have seen from the information that I have included above, throughout this weekend trip we experienced a mixture of extremely and relatively poor weather which resulted in my decision to use my time scouting for locations for future trips (rather than taking a variety of “official” shots like I had hoped). Although I persisted through the weather that we received, and ended up taking a couple of shots on the Mamiya 7, after developing the film, scanning the negatives and briefly editing the files, I noticed that my premonition regarding the outcome of my “official” photographs were correct, and that the aesthetics of the images were greatly affected. However, although this was the case, I personally feel that the locations that I have scouted will be very successful if I manage to capture them in better weather conditions during the following trip(s). This does, however, put a lot of pressure on me to achieve these specific shots during my next weekend trip to the Lake District, but I am most definitely up for the challenge (and am keeping my fingers crossed regarding the weather!).

However, another thing that I noticed from these weekend shots was that, similar to the previous weekend (please see the blog post “Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), all of the “middle-of-the-road” shots that I captured on the Mamiya were still slightly off-centre, even though I carefully considered the positioning of the tripod in order to make sure that the lens of the camera (rather than what I could see in the rangefinder) was in the centre of the path. With this being said, as suggested in the previous trip, I thought that I could possibly crop the images in the future (after scanning them in), but as I am using colour film I would much prefer to get them printed professionally, so I feel that I want to solve the problem at its origin (taking the photos) – however, if this can’t be done, I will obviously consider the use of using the scanned negatives to create my final prints.

Finally, (and this is only a minor point), but I still feel that I much prefer the composition of the Mamiya images (using the 80mm lens) rather than the Canon 5D Mk II images (that uses the 10-24mm wide-angle lens). However, with this being said, as the digital images are only being used to achieve correct settings and as “back-up” images in case something major goes wrong with the colour film, I feel that it isn’t massively important that they differ in compositional strength (also taking into account that I can’t find the appropriate 80mm lens to use for the Canon 5D Mk II).

 

The Trip:

Looking back at the trip in general, although it appeared to be unsuccessful due to the poor weather conditions affecting both the weekend’s plan as well as the aesthetic quality of the images, I actually feel that this trip has been incredibly beneficial for me and a lot more successful than I initially thought. This is because, although it could have gone a lot better in terms of sticking to the original plan and capturing final “official” shots that I could use for my FMP, I was able to adapt my practice to make the most of my time in the Lake District through scouting for locations and collecting data that will allow me to experiment with different techniques in the future. This has therefore meant that the weekend has been very productive and will allow me to both find and create effective “official” photographs on future trips, as well as providing evidence for the continuing development of my FMP.

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