352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Academic Research

 As discussed in my one-to-one session with Anthony (on 14th January 2015 and 11th February 2015), I will be splitting my research into five suggested research groups (and three groups I feel may be appropriate): Academic, Location, Photographic, Technical, Representation of the Land, Personal, Equipment and Editing Software, and Presentation Options. (Please note: some of the resources included within these research sections can link to more than one of the research categories stated above. In this case, I have simply included them in the research section that suits the aspect of the work that I am looking at for my FMP).

This blog post is therefore dedicated to the research that I have conducted through the use of academic resources. As you will see, this section includes research that I came across within my Symposium module (including all of the resources I used and gained knowledge from, as well as those that I knew would be beneficial to revisit for my Final Major Project) and the academic texts suggested in different one-to-one tutorial’s with both Anthony Luvera and Caroline Molloy. In this research section you will find the name and author of the resource, any quotes/sections that I feel might be useful, and brief reflections on the work included as well as sections relating to the how this research could provide me with inspiration for my FMP.

 



ALL OF MY SYMPOSIUM RESEARCH:

 

As I was looking into theories surrounding ideas of reconnection (and the remembrance of reverie memories) through the use of landscape images as memory triggers and tools for recollection within my Symposium essay, I therefore realized that a majority of the research I conducted for this module could be beneficial for my FMP. I have therefore included a PDF of the research bibliography from this Symposium module, as well as a link to the blog post where I discussed and reflected upon individual pieces of Symposium research (throughout the research and development stages of the Symposium module), that I may decide to call into question at different stages throughout my FMP.

Symposium Bibliography

https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/350mc-working-with-photography-in-context-development-of-idea/

 



 SYMPOSIUM RESEARCH REVISITED:

 

Photography: A Critical Introduction (4th Edition) edited by Liz Wells:

  • “Walter Benjamin was among those who had disputed the efficacy of the photograph in this respect, arguing that the reproduction of the surface appearance of places tells us little about the sociopolitical circumstances which influence and circumscribe actual human experience (Benjamin 1931).” – Page 18
    • When I originally read this quote, what I took away from it is that photographs of landscapes and places that simply show their surface appearance doesn’t tell us much about the history and memories associated with the place
    • This therefore links to the idea of possibly using text with images as this technique allows the author to encapsulate the whole story surrounding the landscape
  • “The themes of history and memory have been central to cultural production and discourse through much of the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Photography, film and the archive are associated with the concept of memory, functioning as surrogate, or virtual sites of remembrance, or as metaphors of the process of recalling the past. The experience of viewing archival photographic prints or film can have a seductive, even spellbinding effect on the viewer; their material and aesthetic qualities acting as a trigger to memory, evoking a sense of time and nostalgia, or conjuring fantasies of history. (Connarty and Lanyon 2006).” – Page 63
    • The main aspect that I took away from this quote was the fact that photography and the archive are associated with memory and therefore act as visual sites of remembrance and tools of recollection
    • This is essentially the main idea that I am planning on looking at throughout my FMP and this may therefore be a very useful quote to discuss when arguing how photographs and archives link to memory and remembrance later in my development

 


 

Land Matters: Landscape Photography, Culture and Identity by Liz Wells(also suggested to revisit in the one-to-one tutorial with Caroline Molloy on the 11th February 2015):

  • “Realist landscapes depicted events, people and their relationship to place: a rural funeral, or stonebreakers (Courbet) or agricultural labourers (Millais) – or, indeed, urban environments (Manet), exploring continuities along with effects of modernity.” – Page 32
    • What I personally took away from this quote is that realist landscapes are defined through their association with the events that took place there, along with the people that experienced a relationship to the place
    • This quote therefore links to my FMP as I am essentially looking in to photographing some personal “realist” landscapes through the event that I recall and the relationship I have with the places
    • However, when I was initially confronted with the term “realist” I automatically associated the word with a possible type of photography – a type of photography that, similar to the definition of “realist”, is “is inclined to literal truth” (taken from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/realist)
    • I therefore thought that, as well as relating to my FMP through the idea of (realist) landscapes and their association with people and events, that this could perhaps suggest a type of documentary photography that I could consider for the documentation of the “realist” landscapes I am planning on revisiting
  • “On the other hand, landscape refers to a set of representational practices, the picturing of place (through words, sounds, visual images) (Dorrian and Rose, 2003).” – Page 21
    • This quote is essentially suggesting that landscapes are not only represented through photographs, but are also represented through different “practices” (including words and sound)
    • This quote therefore relates to a number of ideas I had about the experimentation of accompanying features (including text and audio) that I proposed in my original project proposal (please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal” blog post), including:
      • The use of accompanying text (about the memory I recall) that I am planning on situating next to my photographs, in order to allow the audience to gain a greater understanding of the personal context behind the project (which obviously relates to the representation of landscapes through “words”)
      • My idea of wanting to experiment with the creation of soundscapes through the use of ambient noises from the landscapes that I visit (which the audience can listen to whilst viewing my work, in order to create a tool that allows them to immerse themselves, and gain a greater understanding, of my personal, documented memories)
  • “Human action contours the landscape, and stories told give meaning to it.” – Page 19
    • Similar to the quote above by Doreen Massey, this quote is essentially saying that the physical contours of the landscape are made from human action (for example, walking or digging), and that the stories (or histories and memories) associated with the landscape give meaning to it
    • This therefore relates to my FMP because, as suggested above, I am essentially looking into photographing landscapes that are meaningful to me through the memories I associate with them
    • However, this quote also makes reference to the methodology behind my FMP (physically revisiting these different landscapes) through the suggestion of “human action” contorting the landscape – I will be contouring the landscape through the act of revisiting and walking on these particular places
  • “As Doreen Massey has argued, space becomes meaningful through histories told (Massey, 2005).” – Page 19
    • When I first read this quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP
    • This is because it is suggesting that space (for example, landscapes) becomes meaningful through histories (and memories) associated with it – which is essentially what I am looking at, because I am planning on photographing the landscapes that are incredibly meaningful to me due to the associated memories that they hold (and trigger)
  • “Photographs are trans-historical. The image may fade or otherwise deteriorate, but in principle the photo persists as an afterimage.” – Page 51
    • When I read this quote I automatically related it to the overarching context surrounding my FMP (of reconnecting to my deceased Grandpa)
    • This is because, when it said “The image may fade or otherwise deteriorate, but in principle the photo persists as an afterimage.” I associated it with my deceased Grandpa as, although he has faded and deteriorated from my life (through his literal death and the psychological fading of my memories of him), he still persists as an afterimage through the memories I still recall of him
    • I therefore feel that I am looking at this quote (in a metaphorical sense) within my FMP, as I am creating trans-historical photographs of the landscapes that hold particular memories of my Grandpa, allowing him to remain in the present (or “persist”) as an afterthought (or “afterimage”) through the photographs I create
  •  “But, the photograph, in simulating moments from the past, can seem to help us unfold the layers of history. As such it feeds our sense of heritage, which in turn contributes formatively to identity and subjectivity and to collective consciousness.” – Page 53
    • What I took away from this quote is that photographs can “stimulate moments from the past” (i.e. act as memory triggers) which helps us to unfold layers of history in regards to our heritage and identity
    • Looking at my translation of the quote, I therefore feel that this can relate to my FMP as I am planning on taking photographs of landscapes that “stimulate moments from the past” (my personal memories) that are associated with my “heritage” (my family – i.e. my Grandpa) and my “identity” (the events/memories from the past that have shaped me to the individual I am today)
  •  “Landscapes – actual, remembered or idealised – feed our sense of belonging to whatever place, region or nation that we view as homeland.” – Page 54
    • The main thing I took away from this quote is that landscapes (in a variety of different physical or psychological forms) feed our sense of belonging
    • I think that this could possibly relate to my FMP as I am essentially photographing landscapes that hold and trigger some of my personal memories (related to my now deceased Grandpa), which can be used to represent my personal sense of belonging by trying to reconnect with my past (and family members in my past)
  •  “If history resonates in landscape imagery, recognition of sites and familiarity with local histories become prerequisites for understanding extra layers of significance.” – Page 235-236
    • Whilst reading this quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP as it is essentially suggesting that the recognition of sites through their familiarity of (local) histories provide and extra layer of significance for the individual
    • In other words, I feel that my FMP is exploring this ideology as, through landscape imagery (i.e. photography), I am documenting sites that I recognize, and am familiar with, (“recognition of sites and familiarity…”) due to the relationship it has with my personal recollected memories (or “history”), which provides the landscape with another layer of “significance”
  •  “Although photographers may critique particular ideas that have become associated with land and landscape, their work nonetheless reflects their own feelings of identification with the region that is their homeland. Projects may, in effect, be an exploration of themselves as much as of the circumstances pictured.” – Page 247
    • This quote greatly relates to my FMP as it is suggesting that (landscape) photographers work reflects and explores themselves (through the feelings and identity they associated with their “homeland”) just as much as the subject that they photograph (in this case, landscapes)
    • For my FMP, I am essentially creating a piece of work that reflects and explores my personal past by photographing landscapes that I feel I can class as my “homeland” – the project is therefore just as much about myself and my past as it is about the landscapes I photograph
  •  “Photographs are about memory – or perhaps about the absence of memory, providing pictures to fill voids, illustrating and sometimes falsifying our collective memory (Lippard, 1998: 60)” – Page 261
    • When I read this quote, I mainly focused on the first part of it that suggested that: “Photographs are about memory – or perhaps about the absence of memory, providing pictures to fill voids…”
    • When looking at this more specific section of the quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP as, although I am creating images based on the memories that are triggered from/associated with different landscapes, the methodology behind creation of these images will also “fill a (personal) void” by offering me the opportunity to psychologically reconnect to my deceased Grandpa through revisiting particular landscapes, whilst the photos in themselves (that I will create on the project) will also be used in the future to “fill the void” created from the fading and absent memories associated with the project
  •  “Photographs can express something of this through form, aesthetics and photographic coding, although in terms of affects, photography cannot replicate actual experiences. But, as I shall suggest, photographs can reference, or substitute, through invoking equivalent memories.” – Page 262
    • When I read this quote, I thought that the second section o it (starting from “photography cannot replicate…”) greatly related to my FMP
    • As I am planning on taking photographs of particular locations that are associated with personal memories of my Grandpa, instead of trying to replicate the actual experience I had in the past, I am simply creating a representation of this past event through creating photographs that “reference” and “invoke” associated (or “equivalent”) memories
  •  “Photography is often discussed in terms of time, most particularly through the notion that photographs ‘freeze’ a moment in time, referencing something past.” – Page 263
    • As this is a widely known notion in regards to photography, I will obviously be implementing this quote within my FMP as I will be freezing moments in time through the creation of my landscape images (which, when looking at them in the future will obviously reference something in the past)
    • However, I also feel that I am looking at this quote from a more metaphorical standpoint, as I will be “referencing something past” through the context of my project (by creating landscape photographs that are associated, and therefore represent, past memories)
  •  “For the walker, photographs and diaries act as memory aides, helping to conserve the precision of particular moments of observation for later contemplation. They record something of that which was experienced. The walk is a fact; a plan realised through time from starting point to outcome.” – Page 288
    • To simplify this quote, what I took away from it is that for walkers, photographs (and diaries) act as memory aids through recording something that was experienced on the walk
    • When looking back at this quote, I therefore feel that it relates to my FMP in a number of different ways:
    • As it is focusing primarily on the “walker”, this obviously relates to the methodology behind my FMP, as I will be revisiting (and walking to) places that I associate with personal memories
    • In relation to the idea that “walkers” use photographs (and diaries) as “memory aids”, this essentially relates to my FMP as I am creating images of landscapes that act as memory triggers (or “memory aids”) to some of my personal memories, which could later be used as to aid in the recollection of the memories associated with the experience of the project
    • Finally, when looking at the aspect of “recording something experienced”, I am looking at this idea in two different ways within my final major project – the first is that, through the actual creation of the photographs, I will be recording something that was experienced in the present, but, through the context of my project, I am also creating these images to record a representation of something that was experienced in the past (my memories of a past event)
  •  “From the point of view of the photographer, photographs do more than simply provoke memories and associations; given the optical unconscious, they may enhance memory and perception. They also act as aide-mémoires; photographs remind us of moments, experiences or details that might otherwise fade.” – Page 290
    • When I read this quote, as it is essentially talking about the photographs ability to enhance memory (and perception) through being able to remind us of past moments, experiences and details that would otherwise fade, I thought that it related well to my FMP
    • This is because I am essentially looking into the idea of reconnecting to my deceased Grandpa (and the fading memories I have of him), through the use of photographs (and landscapes) acting as a memory triggers, which can enhance the recollection (or “remembrance”) of different moments, experiences and details in the past that I shared with him
  •  “Indeed, imagery may reconfigure memory. In extracting from a narrative, perhaps a place visited and a journey experienced, photographs prioritise particular moments, foregrounding them rhetorically to the extent that other parts of the experience may fall away.” – Page 290
    • When I read this particular quote, I thought that the section discussing “prioritizing particular moments, foregrounding them rhetorically to the extent that other parts of the experience may fall away”, greatly related to some of the ideas I looked at within my Symposium regarding the fading of memories and how these memories are actually recalled in fragments (rather than as a whole)
    • Once remembering this particular aspect of my Symposium talk (that was triggered through the introduction to this quote), I then thought that it may be interesting to create a exhibitory piece of work that focuses on this process of (fragmented) recollection – however, as I am still in the early stages of my development, I am unsure as to how I would do this (apart from the fact that I could represent it through the use of the accompanying text), but I will bear this idea in mind as I progress with my project
  •  “For viewers, photographs of places – which may or may not have been actually visited – operate evocatively through drawing on memories of the sites depicted or of similar sights, as well as more generalised knowledge about places.” – Page 290
    • When I was introduced to this quote, I found that it greatly related to my FMP, especially the feedback that I have received suggesting that my project is “too personal” and needs to be made “more accessible to the viewer” (suggested by both Matt Johnston and Anthony Luvera in numerous one-to-ones and a formative feedback session – please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Getting the “Go Ahead” (One-to-One Tutorial with Matt Johnston)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 2 (One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)” blog posts)
    • This is because this quote is essentially suggesting that, although viewers may not have actually visited the places depicted in a landscape photograph, they can often draw on memories and their general knowledge of similar sights that they have experienced
    • I could therefore possibly use this quote as an argument against the feedback that I have gained by suggesting that individuals viewing my work will be able to relate (and reflect) on my work through the manner suggested above

 


 

Theatres of Memory: Past and Present in Contemporary Culture by Raphael Samuel:

  • Perhaps the most remarkable of the decade’s discoveries, from the point of view of the recycling of the old photographs, was the Francis Frith collection – a quarter of a million negatives, ‘all painstakingly dated and filed’, including views of almost every town and village in the Unites Kingdom, taken over a period of a hundred years by the great Victorian photographer and his successors.” – Page 342
    • The Francis Frith Collection – http://www.francisfrith.com
    • This obviously relates to the idea I have about using archived photographs from my Grandpa’s collection for inspiration for my FMP
    • It is useful to know about this archive as it allows me to gain an understanding of the different types of materials that can be archived (including photos, maps and ‘memories’) which will help me in deciding possible archival exhibition pieces (that may include Grandpa’s photos and collected materials – as suggested in each of my proposals, please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”)
    • The ‘memories’ section of this archive also looks into ideas surrounding art and text and how text can be used (alongside an image) to elicit a greater understanding of the message that is being told (please see screen print below for an example)

The Francis Frith Collection - Memories

  • The family photograph has long been used as a narrative device in autobiography. A more complex use of it, as a means of distancing the author from the remembered self, has more recently come to fore. Ronald Fraser, in his ‘In Search of a Past’, uses it in a series of flashbacks to rediscover a repressed and buried self…” – Page 351
    • Ronald Fraser “In Search of a Past” – http://www.amazon.co.uk/In-Search-Past-Ronald-Fraser/dp/1844675971
    • This idea briefly relates to my planned use of family photographs within my FMP, but more greatly links to the ideas of making personal memories/projects more accessible for the viewer (as discussed in a one-to-one session with Anthony Luvera on the 14th January 2015)
    • For me, it is suggesting that if the memory is narrated as a flashback (and, possibly, written in the third person – he/she) it makes it more accessible to the viewer as they can appear to relate more to the piece of writing – I will consider this concept when I move on to research projects that will help with the technical concept of including text within art
  • A much more straightforward nostalgic use of the family album is in oral history, which has used them as a device for family reconstruction and opening up memory lanes.” – Page 351
    • This quote describes some of the methodology I will be undertaking within my FMP
    • By looking back at Grandpa’s collection of photographs, it has sparked many memories, but also many questions – I therefore plan on talking to my dad about the different memories we remember of my Grandpa which will therefore relate to this idea of oral history within the family
  • What seems to be involved in the case of old photographs is not so much getting back to the past – anyway the remembered past – still less, as the compliers of local albums sometimes suggest, hanging on to it as it disappears before our eyes, but rather of creating a lost Eden.” – Page 356
    • For me, this quote greatly links to one of the main themes I am looking at throughout my FMP: reconnection
    • It is suggesting that old photographs act as a gateway or a window into the remembered past, allowing us to reconnect with those in the past by creating a ‘lost Eden’ (a perfect place where we are still connected to those we miss)

 


 

Landscape as Photograph by Estelle Jussim and Elizabeth Lindquist-Cock:

  • But pictorialists like Clarence White, [Alvin Langdon] Coburn, and Edward Steichen also relied upon uncorrected lenses, including a soft-focus portrait lens, to diffuse and dematerialize the landscape. The object was to create, by any means available, ‘a mood of dreaminess and detachment’.” – Page 65
  • ’Camera Work’, Alfred Stieglitz’s pean to pictorialism…” – Page 66
    • Alfred Stieglitz ‘Camera Work’ Complete Photographs – http://www.amazon.co.uk/Alfred-Stieglitz-Camera-Complete-Photographs/dp/3822837849
    • As this quote suggests, Alfred Stieglitz created and published a magazine that focused on the idea of creativity (and pictorialism) within photography – as I am looking into different ways to experiment with this idea of pictorial photographs, it may be beneficial for me to look at some of these magazines
  • White symbolism involved misty landscapes; sensual but not pornographic nudes; Mothers with children representing aspects of life, death, and rebirth; costumed maidens harking back to medieval pageants; and pastoral animals.” – Page 65
    • Again, this quote relates greatly to the experimental idea I am considering for my FMP: Pictorialism
    • If I am to create images in similar ways as suggested above (with soft-focus portrait lenses to create misty landscapes) I am therefore going to be embracing this idea of white symbolism

 


 

Photography: The Cultural History (4th Edition) by Mary Warner Marien:

  • “Photographic series expanded the notion of photography from that of image-making processes to something akin to writing.” – Page 49
    • This quote simply relates to the idea of included text within my final photographic project and suggest that this has become increasingly popular throughout the growth of the photographic and creative industries

 


 

The Photograph by Graham Clarke:

  • “Landscape photographers chose those areas beyond human habitation, extreme borderlands and national parks pristine environments with as little evidence of human settlement as possible.” – Page 65
    • This quote will help me when it comes to taking the landscape images for my FMP as it tells me what is expected of a landscape photograph
    • However, as I am planning on documenting memories through the association of landscapes, I think that including some form of evidence of human presence may aid the fact that the image will be a representation of a memory

 


 

Emotional Geographies edited by Joyce Davidson, Liz Bondi, and Mick Smith:

  • Within Chapter 15 of this book (“An Ecology of Emotion, Memory, Self and Landscape”), author Owain Jones “attempt[s] to write more fully an account of memories of a childhood landscape.” (Please see screenshots below (Pages 209-211 are not included) – sections discussed are written in italics)
  • This is perhaps suggesting that photographs cannot tell the whole story that one is trying to put across, and it is therefore the use of descriptive (and creative) text that helps to represent and document the whole story (or memory) – this obviously, again, links to the idea of including text within my FMP

 


 

Rites of Return: Diaspora Poetics and the Politics of Memory edited by Marianne Hirsch and Nancy K. Miller:

  • Memoir, a literary genre reinvigorated and reinvented in the 1990s, has become an increasingly productive form for exploring the meaning of family, generational identity, and ethnicity…” – Page 10
    • The idea of memoirs is essentially what I am looking at throughout my FMP – I am creating a photographic memoir that focuses on the landscapes I experience with the person I am trying to reconnect with (my Grandpa)
    • This also, therefore can link into the idea of including text within my final piece as memoirs are, obviously, usually written

 


 

Locating Memory: Photographic Acts edited by Annette Kuhn and Kristen Emiko McAllister:

  • “These authors show that as a medium, photographs are far from transparent documents that can offer veracity. Like memory, they provide only partial, incomplete narratives.” – Page 6
    • This quote also links to my idea of including text within my final piece and suggests, as I have always thought, that text needs to accompany photographs in order to create a bigger, more full picture for the viewer to understand

 


 

Illuminations by Walter Benjamin, edited by Hanna Arendt:

  • “The storyteller takes what he tells from experience – his own or that reported by others. And he in turn makes it the experience of those who are listening to his tale.” – Page 87
    • This quote caught my attention as it is not only discussing ideas surrounding storytelling and narrating but also making individual projects/stories accessible to the viewer
    • The first part of this quote relates to my FMP as I am planning on creating and telling a story from events and things that I have experienced in the past (my experiences)
    • Whereas, the second part of this quote is discussing how successful storytellers can make their personal stories accessible and immersive for the viewer, creating an experience for them
  • “There is nothing that commends a story to memory more effectively than that chaste compactness which precludes psychological analysis.” – Page 90
    • Although this may be incorrect, what I took away from this quote is that the more memorable stories are full of details and immersive qualities as this allows the ‘listener’/’viewer’ to experience the story
    • This idea therefore relates to my FMP exhibition pieces as I feel that the use of a variety of outputs (including photographs, text, and archives) automatically enhances the details provided within the story
  • “Only by virtue of a comprehensive memory can epic writing absorb the course of events on the one hand and, with the passing of these, make its peace with the power of death on the other.” – Page 96
    • Again, what I took away from this quote, which may be wrong, is that through documenting memories in a literate sense, individuals can not only absorb, recall and translate the remembered event in terms of writing, but they can also understand that the event they are recording is no more (it is the death of the event)
    • If my interpretation of this quote is correct, this therefore relates to my FMP as I am looking in to documenting past, dead moments and events both visually and literately
  • “And from this… Arise the genuinely epic experiences of time: hope and memory… Only in the novel… does there occur a creative memory which transfixes the object and transforms it.” – Page 98
    • This quote is suggesting that it is only in the creation of a written novel that memories can become transfixed and transformed (transformed meaning that they come to public light rather than the privatization of the memory that is usually experienced by a single individual)
    • This therefore relates to my FMP as I am planning on creating a narrative, using both images and writing, which will transfix and transform the personal memories I recall
  • “The reader of the novel, however, is isolated, more so than any other reader… In this solitude of his, the reader of a novel seizes upon his material more jealously than anyone else. He is ready to make it completely his own, to devour it, as it were.” – Page 99
    • This quote discusses ideas of escapism when individuals immerse themselves in a novel
    • Although I am not planning on writing a novel for my FMP, I am considering creating a memorial book with photographs and creative writing pieces
    • I therefore feel that this quote should be deliberated due to the fact that if I were to create a memorial book for the FMP exhibition, the individual reading it would not be able to isolate themselves within the piece whilst it is in the gallery setting – however, I feel that this idea of escapism and immersion could be created if the viewer listened to soundscapes of ambient noises associated with the landscapes, whilst reading this possible memorial book, as I feel that it will be able to aid them in the transportation to the memorial world I will try to create

 


 

Ambient Thinking: Or, Sweating Over Theory by Alison Bartlett:

  • “When a writer becomes aware of their surroundings and articulates those conditions into their narrative, the reader is lifted out of the narrative into a metaframe; out of the body of writing and into the extra-diegetic.” – Page 2
    • This quote is discussing different writing styles and may therefore be helpful in the written text I am considering using to accompany pieces within my FMP
    • This quote is suggesting that when a writer includes aspects from their present surroundings within their narrative, the reader not only becomes immersed in the location within the story, but also begins to feel strongly connected to the writer and their process of writing the story
    • As I am not yet sure as to the style of writing I am considering using within my FMP piece, this idea of writing styles may/may not be beneficial to me in the future

 


 

Disembodied Landscapes by Francesca Veronesi and Petra Gemeinboeck:

  • “Part of this investigation was to experiment how the use of a technology that is sensitive to location and movement may alter the interaction with place. We were interested in exploring how this alteration could immerse participants into a landscape augmented with memories.” – Page 77
  • “The idea behind this modality of interaction was to find a way to transfer the information retrieved in a past experience, where a soundscape was produced according to the participants exploratory movement in space… The transplanted soundscape opened up the potential of an endless seeming combination of storylines; transiting across the surface, new pieces of the memory became available to the user, like a jigsaw puzzle gradually, fragment by fragment, revealing an – Page 79
    • Each of these quote are discussing the use of audio recordings, or soundscapes, within a photographic project – this therefore relates to my idea where I am considering using soundscapes within my FMP piece in order to immerse the viewer in the landscape and the memory I am displaying
    • These quotes are suggesting that the use of soundscapes within photographic projects create a more immersive and interactive experience by opening up numerous storylines through focusing the viewers attention on different aspects within the image, at different points in time, that they may not have noticed before

 


 

Family Secrets: Acts of Memory and Imagination by Annette Kuhn:

  • “… Memory texts…” – Page 3
    • This name is given to texts that discuss an individuals memories and can therefore link to the art and text concept I am considering using to document my personal memories
    • In this section of text, Annette Kuhn also goes on to say that memory texts are neither confessions nor autobiographical writings – this perhaps suggests that memory texts should not be written in the past tense, but should perhaps be written as if they were written at the time of the memory, in a present tense (for example, instead of “I looked towards the horizon…” I would say “As I look towards the horizon…”)
      • This idea has stemmed from the fact that memory texts are not autobiographical writings as these are usually written in the past tense as they look back at what the have accomplished
    • “… Is there some inherit connection between poetry, memory, and a feeling of timelessness?” – Page 112-113
      • I feel that this quote can link to both the idea of using text within my FMP piece and the suggestion of how I can make this personal project accessible to the viewer
      • This is because it is suggesting that poetry (a form of writing that I may consider for the art and text concept of my FMP) and memory (as well as photographs) create something timeless, and timelessness can be greatly appreciated by the viewer in regards to viewing photographic projects

 


 

Family Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory by Marianne Hirsch:

  • “In Camera Lucida, pictures and words come together to create prose pictures… Text and image, intricately entangled in a narrative web, work in collaboration to tell a complicated story of loss and longing that Barthes’s critical terminology can barely approximate.” – Page 4
    • This quote discusses ideas surrounding art/photos and text, and has given the name of a writing style that I may consider, and therefore use, within my FMP pieces: prose pictures
  • “This work of contestation appears not so much in actual family photographs as in meta-photographic texts which place family photographs into narrative contexts, either by reproducing them or by describing them…” – Page 8
    • This too links to the idea of art/photos and text and suggests that by describing images or creating a story behind some images is in fact creating meta-photographic texts (which I believe to be very similar to ‘prose pictures’)
  • “Memorial books… The memorial books are acts of witness and sites of memory…” – Page 246
    • As stated in my original proposal, I am planning on creating a book that includes some of my images, alongside pieces of creative writing in order to successfully recreate my memory for different viewers to understand – this book would therefore be called a memorial book (as suggested in this quote)

 


 

Memory, History, Forgetting by Paul Ricoeur:

  • “Testimony is by origin oral. It is listened to, heard. The archive is written. It is read, consulted.” – Page 166
    • This quote obviously links to the possible inclusion of an archival aspect within my FMP piece
    • It suggests that archives are used as a way of evidencing an idea or concept through the use of the term “consulted”, which therefore offers me a slightly wider understanding of the archives use
    • With this being said, when contemplating what materials are to be included in the possible archive aspect, I will therefore distinguish items that offer evidence for some of the concepts discussed within my other exhibition pieces

 


 

Memory: Documents of Contemporary Art edited by Ian Farr:

  • “Blurred out of focus or overexposed, or otherwise ‘flawed’ in innumerable ways, they evoke those memory-impressions we might at first want to recall as if in the bright focus of the present but learn to cherish more in the fragmentary and fragile way they are offered up to us.” – Page 12 (‘Introduction: Not Quite How I Remember’ It by Ian Farr)
    • This quote greatly relates to ideas of experimentation that I am considering in order to create an image that represents memories
    • By creating blurred, out of focus, and overexposed images for my FMP, this quote is suggesting that they will represent memories and memory-impressions more so than pristine images as this technique could be used to symbolize the fading and distancing of the memory

 



 ACADEMIC RESEARCH (FOR FMP):

 

Art and Text – (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 14th January 2015):

  • “The contradictions that exist between words and images, and thus between description and representation, energized artistic production and critical debate in successive decades of the century. Writers have used visual strategies to extend and disrupt the communicative values of words, while painters have used language to interrogate the conventions of representation.” – Page 10 (The Schwitters Legacy: Language and Art in the Early Twentieth Century by Will Hill)
    • As you have probably guessed from the title of this book, this quote (and every quote from this book) relates to my possible idea of incorporating text within my FMP
    • The first section of this quote suggests that words don’t simply need to be used to evidence what has already been stated, but they can also create contradictions within pieces which creates a more thought-provoking outcome for the audience
    • This quote then goes on to suggest that both writers and artists have embraced the use of visual and written aspects in order to further enhance the representation and meaning conveyed within their pieces of work – this supportive written strategy is the approach that I think I will be considering for my FMP exhibition piece due to the fact that, as stated before, I want to create a piece of work that provides the viewer with the best possible understanding of my project
  • “To give a text a pictorial form, reveals complex contradictions between visual representation and linguist description, and reminds us that language is a fragile and illogical construct, bound to its subject by cultural compact alone. While we take for granted the equivalence between the word and its subject, they are not linked by any actual resemblance, but only by the shared perception of meaning inherent in language.” – Page 11 (The Schwitters Legacy: Language and Art in the Early Twentieth Century by Will Hill)
    • This quote suggests that using written or oral language alone cannot encapsulate the whole of the story as, by pairing it with a visual form, we (the viewer/audience) begin to notice gaps in the provided language – and it is the same the other way round (text can be used to fill in the gaps of a singular visual aspect)
    • It discusses the fact that no piece of accompanying text can be created to encompass and resemble the whole story provided the visual form (and vice versa), as they simply share a perception and meaning of the same story
    • Although this is the case, however, using both text and visual aids creates a more in-depth narrative as both accompanying aspects fill in each others narrative gaps – it is therefore this relationship between text and visual aspects that I am considering looking at for my FMP
  • “Text art is an art in step with the linguist turn in philosophy that replaces speculations about the mind with an analysis of language use.” – Page 29 (Turning the Whole Thing Around: Text Art Today by Dave Beech)
    • In simple terms, what I took away from this quote is that text art (or art that uses accompanying text) creates a simplified understanding of the narrative and representation depicted by a particular piece
    • This is therefore what I am planning on looking at when considering the incorporation of text within my FMP

 

  • Doug Aitken “Disappear”, 2006 and Doug Aitken “West”, 2008 (Page 51 and 203)
    • (Below you will see the examples of his work that were given in the book, along with some examples I also found on his website)
    • The work of Doug Aitken caught my eye when flicking through this book as I thought it was a very unique way to display both photographs and text
    • As you can see, the images he has chosen to display in this text format usually contradict the word it’s presented as or seems to be completely unrelated
    • However, I feel that if the viewer spends enough time thinking about the piece, they will be able to find a connection between the photo and the word
    • This piece of work therefore truly challenges the viewer to consider every aspect of the work because, due to the sizing of the words, they feel that they have been confronted with meaning yet they still struggle to find the correlation
    • In relation to my own project, although I think this is a very interesting and unique project output to consider, I feel that it would take away from the underlying, meaningful context of my idea – I feel that this output style would work better for project that perhaps act as raising awareness campaigns as I feel that it has a very commercial sense to it

 

  • Susan Hiller “The J. Street Project (Index)”, 2002-2005 (Page 149)
    • What caught my attention from this project was the way that Susan Hiller indexed the places she took photographs of in the form of a map that was printed directly onto the wall
    • By doing this, I feel that the viewer is offered all the relevant information for the project’s photographs in such a way that it still provides them with a sense of mystery and unknowing – they know where the photographs were taken but they do not know which photographs where taken where
    • This allows the viewer to spend time contemplating the separate aspects of this project by drawing their own conclusions on the linkage between the map and the photographs
    • As I found out whilst researching into the Francis Frith Collection above, maps are a main resource that is associated with archives – I therefore feel that if I were to include this indexical technique within my project, it would not only provide the viewer with enough information to draw their on connection between this and the other exhibition pieces (including a possible memorial book), but that it would also suggest two of the main themes I am looking at throughout this project: archives and revisiting
    • I am therefore greatly considering using this technique within my FMP exhibition pieces but will still consider other forms of incorporated text before making my final decision (please not that the map I would use if I were to go down this visual route would be of the Lake District)

 

  • John Baldessari “Rolling: Tire”, 1972 (Page 172) and Robert Barry “Inert Gas Series: Neon”, 1969 (Page 235)
    • When I saw these two pieces of work within the book, I thought that they were very simple ways of displaying photos and text side-by-side
    • They made me consider that I didn’t necessarily need to create a book in order to connect text and images and that I could create detailed installations that include both
    • However, as I am planning on revisiting numerous places and creating images to represent a number of memories, as well as wanting to write incredibly detailed accounts of the memory I recall, I feel that displaying all of this as a small installation may seem overpowering and isn’t necessarily the best way of displaying such personal concepts
    • However, I could consider using this type of text and image layout in other ways, including within the possible memorial book, but feel that I can’t really decide whether or not to use it at this moment in time without having the resources (images and text) I will need to create it
    • I will, however, bear this idea in mind when I come to experimenting with my FMP exhibition pieces

 

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Robert Barry

Robert Barry

 

  • Svetlana Kopystiansky “Seascape”, 1989 (Page 267)
    • When I originally saw this image, I simply thought that it was a photo of a simple seascape, however, once I underwent close inspection, I soon realized that it was actually covered in lots of small, intricate text
    • As soon as I realized this, I felt that this technique encapsulated the whole overarching idea of my project – although others may simply see a picturesque landscape, I see a landscape that is covered in personal memories and family stories
    • However, as I want to create a piece that allows the viewer to understand, visualize, and immerse themselves in the personal memory that I am describing, I feel that the use of text in this particular manner doesn’t allow that, as it is too small to distinguish in comparison to the overall image
    • With this being said, however, I feel that it is a very interesting idea that I should consider experimenting with (along with text to accompany the image) once I have started choosing my final images for my FMP
    • This work also reminded me of a university project I created in my first year of my photography course (called “Encountering Culture” – https://hollyconstantinephotography.wordpress.com/2012/11/27/assignment-one-encountering-culture/) where I also overlaid text onto my images – this has therefore reminded me of the photographers and projects I researched for this particular technique, specifically Duane Michals
Svetlana Kopystiansky Seascape

Svetlana Kopystiansky Seascape

 


 

Getting into the Act: A History of Looking by Nichola Cecelia Bird – (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Caroline Molloy on the 11th February 2015):

  • An investigation of an original photograph can take two routes: one in which the camera documents the process or journey – collecting evidence of possible traces of places or people…” – Abstract
    • The main section that I took away from this quote is that it is simply suggesting that a function of a camera (and therefore the photograph it creates) is to “document the process or journey – collecting evidence of possible traces of places and people.”
    • This quote therefore links to my FMP as I am planning on capturing a photographic documentation of the landscapes I have revisited (linking to documenting “the process or journey”, as well as “places”) in order to create photographic representations (or “evidence”) of present traces of my now deceased Grandpa (which are the memories I recall of him – this links to the “traces of people”)
  • In this labyrinth of photographs and autobiography, the desire for a history of looking is driven by loss, the trauma of death.” – Page 2
    • This quote is essentially saying that the desire for looking back (at different photographs and autobiographies) is often “driven by loss, the trauma of death”
    • This therefore links to my FMP because, as a part of my methodology, I am planning on “looking back” at some of my Grandpa’s old photographs (as well as creating my own landscape images), which is driven by the idea of wanting to reconnect to my Grandpa after “loosing” him to the “trauma of death”
  • “Here the photograph throws me onto my own resources and I find myself speculating.” – Page 5
    • Although Bird suggests this idea after looking at a particular image she is analyzing for her PhD, I think that this quote can relate to almost any photograph, and can therefore be used within my FMP
    • Here, she is simply implying that photographs can allow the viewer to speculate the image through the use of their individual knowledge and past history (or “resources”)
    • This could therefore relate to my FMP as, like suggested above, I have received similar feedback from a number of my tutors suggesting that my project is “too personal” and needs to be made “more accessible to the viewer” (suggested by both Matt Johnston and Anthony Luvera in numerous one-to-one and formative feedback session – please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Getting the “Go Ahead” (One-to-One Tutorial with Matt Johnston)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 2 (One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)” blog posts)
    • I could therefore possibly use this quote as an argument against the feedback that I have gained by suggesting that individuals viewing my work will be able to use their own knowledge and past history (or “resources”) to gain an understanding of my work
  • Even your own photographs of distant relatives can seem remote, almost meaningless.” – Page 8
    • I feel that this quote can greatly relate to my FMP in terms of the archival aspect I am planning on using (by searching through photographs that belonged to my Grandpa), as well as the creation of my own landscape images
    • This is because it is suggesting that photographs of distant relatives can seem “remote, almost meaningless”, which I can apply to my Grandpa’s photographs
    • However, through the creation of my own images (in some cases through the response to these found photographs) it can be suggested that I am challenging this feeling of remote meaninglessness by creating images that not only have their own meaning, but that also enhance the meaning (and the context) surrounding the found photos
  • “This photograph holds two ways of looking back, both of which take a curious route outside of the photograph and are driven by absence.” – Page 9
    • When I first read this quote, I thought that it was essentially suggesting that a photograph is used by individuals to look back (into the past) by taking into account their own knowledge, histories and resources (the “route outside of the photograph” – which also links to the quote from Page 5 seen above), which is driven by the idea of what is absent (which can also relate to the quote from Page 2 that talks about “loss, the trauma of death”)
    • As it relates to the two quotes that I suggested (please see above) I therefore think that this quote can relate to my FMP as it can be used to suggest that “individuals viewing my work will be able to use their own knowledge and past history to gain an understanding of my work”, as well as the fact that “I am planning on looking back at some of my Grandpa’s old photographs (as well as creating my own landscape images), which is driven by the idea of wanting to reconnect to my “absent” Grandpa after loosing him to the trauma of death
  • “… A strange sense of history, memory shaped in someway by my own Mother and grandMother’s histories of shop work.” – Page 20
    • This quote is essentially suggesting that memory (which is “a strange sense of history”) can be shaped by the histories of our relatives and, although this quote is discussing a personal example of Bird’s, I feel that this quote could be adapted slightly to fit in with my FMP
    • Throughout my project, I am looking into the idea of reconnecting with my deceased Grandpa through the memories I shared with him – however, in the creation of this project, I will also be creating my own, new memories that have therefore been shaped by my Grandpa’s history (as I am revisiting locations that we both visited sometime in our past)
  • “This makes me aware once again of my own looking from a distance, one created by history, geographical location, processes of media and death.” – Page 28
    • This quote is looking into Bird as a viewer and how she calls on different “resources” such as “history, geographical location, processes of media and death”
    • This quote can therefore, once again, be used to link to my FMP through the idea of viewers, and how they could possibly relate to my work – as suggested above on a couple of occasions, I gained feedback suggesting that my project is “too personal” and that it needs to be made “more accessible to the viewer” (suggested by both Matt Johnston and Anthony Luvera in numerous one-to-one and formative feedback session – please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Getting the “Go Ahead” (One-to-One Tutorial with Matt Johnston)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 2 (One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)” blog posts)
    • This quote can be used as an argument against this feedback, as it is suggesting that “individuals viewing my work will be able to use their own resources (which include “history, geographical location, processes of media and death”) to gain an understanding of my work
  • “Perhaps if the building still existed, more would drop into place: I might be able to solve some of the spatial riddles this photograph presents; or retrieve other facts, such as who stood where.” – Page 30
    • Although this quote is essentially discussing the idea of returning to a place in order to gain a greater understanding of the “riddles” posed by the photograph, I feel that, once again, this quote can be adapted to fit in with my FMP
    • As it is essentially suggesting that returning to a place will provide an individual with more information, this idea can relate to my FMP as I am returning to different locations within the Lake District that either hold or trigger different memories I have with my Grandpa, providing me with more psychological information regarding the place, the person, and the past
  • “…The desire for a history of looking that finally includes touching.” – Page 40
    • As this quote can be used to provide a relationship between the idea of looking at a photograph (“a history of looking”) and “touching”, I therefore feel that this could greatly relate to the methodology behind my FMP
    • A part of my methodology involves looking at found images of my Grandpa (which links to “a history of looking”), whilst another section of my methodology includes returning to the landscapes within the photograph, walking along different paths and experiencing the landscape in general (which can be seen as a response to looking at the images – relating to the idea of “finally includes touching”)

 


 

Research into the Land Art Movement (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Caroline Molloy on the 11th February 2015):

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Caroline Molloy (on the 11th February 2015), she suggested that I look into the concept of the Land Art Movement (which includes the idea of cameraless photography) by exploring the work of Susan Derges and Jem Southam

  • Although these particular photographers will be using different techniques to what I am planning on using for my FMP, Caroline suggested to read interviews and written work that discuss the individuals and the collections they have created, in conjunction with the idea of the Land Art Movement, in order to “tighten my perspective” regarding relationships with the Land in both Art and Photography
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the overall research I conducted regarding the idea of the Land Art Movement, as well as the more specific research I underwent through reading interviews with the two suggested photographers, Susan Derges and Jem Southam, along with reflections on some of the ideas mentioned (the links to the websites I used for research and the interviews can also be found below):

Overall Land Art Movement Research:

  • http://www.tate.org.uk/learn/online-resources/glossary/l/land-art
  • “Land art is art made directly in the landscape, sculpting the land into earthworks or making structures using natural materials found in the landscape such as rocks or twigs.”
    • When I read this definition of land art, although I don’t think that I am necessarily sculpting land into earthworks or making structures using natural materials, I still feel that the term could apply to my FMP
    • This is because, through the methodology of my project (where I revisit different locations that are personally significant to me through the memories that they hold or trigger), I am essentially “sculpting” the land through treading down paths that have been walked numerous times in the past (by myself and others)
    • Also, as suggested in each of my proposals (please see in my please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”), I have decided to collect natural materials from the locations, to add an archival aspect to the project, which, although I am not making sculptures out of these items, relates to the “use of natural materials”
  • “Though some artists such as Smithson used mechanical earth-moving equipment to make their artworks, other artists made minimal and temporary interventions in the landscape such as Richard Long who simply walked up and down until he had made a mark in the earth.”
    • Although, once again, this quote discusses types of techniques that I probably won’t be experimenting with throughout my FMP, I decided to include it within my research as it mentions the artist Richard Long
    • In a one-to-one tutorial with David Rule (on the 11th February 2015) it was suggested that I should research into Richard Long’s methodology and work, and I therefore feel that this quote provides me with context surrounding the artist, allowing me to gain an understanding as to why it was suggested that I considered him within my research – for a more detailed reflection on Richard Long’s work, please see the blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research”
  • “Land art was usually documented in artworks using photographs and maps which the artist could exhibit in a gallery. Land artists also made land art in the gallery by bringing in material from the landscape and using it to create installations.”
    • When reading this particular section of the definition of “Land Art” I was drawn mainly to the first section where it says “Land art was usually documented in artworks using photographs and maps which the artist could exhibit in a gallery.”
    • This is because I feel that this section greatly relates to my FMP as, through briefly participating in the creation of “land art” (through the “sculpting” of the land by treading down paths that have been walked numerous times in the past – as stated above), my methodology not only involves me photographing these different locations that have been included in the “land art movement” (for example, photographing the paths that both me and my Grandpa have walked), but I am also using a map within my projects progression in order to highlight the locations that I have visited

 

Susan Derges (http://www.susanderges.com):

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  • http://www.vam.ac.uk/channel/people/photography/shadow_catchers_camera-less_photography_susan_derges/
  • “What brought me into making images like I do is very much to do with sense of place.”
    • The key phrase that I took away from this quote was the idea of “sense of place”
    • I feel that this terminology greatly relates to my FMP as I am looking into the psychological sense of places in the Lake District (in terms of the memories that they hold or trigger) in order to create visual representations of this personal, memorial sense
  •  “Water is absolutely key to everything that happens internally to us, and externally; and it is the most fantastic metaphor for how everything operates. It can stand for a stream of thoughts, cascades of neural activity in your mind; it can stand for the idea of a circulatory system in the landscape or in the body interchangeably; it seems to be something that connects everything.”
    • Although this quote from Derges is clearly focusing on the idea of “water” being used as numerous metaphors through the idea that “it seems to be something that connects everything”, I feel that with a slight adaptation to this quote, it could greatly relate to my FMP
    • Replacing the term “water” with “landscape”, within my FMP I am looking at how the landscape can not only connect me to (and trigger) my memories, but through this connection, can also reconnect me to my lost Grandpa – throughout the creation of this project “LANDSCAPE seems to be something that connects ME”
  •  “… The underlying desire to make images in the first place was to talk about what underlies the visible, rather than to just show the visible.”
    • Although Derges is obviously looking at her own work and how she wanted to create pieces that “talk about what underlies the visible”, I feel that this idea could also relate to my FMP
    • Through the creation of my landscape photographs that represent a particular location in which I remember personal memories regarding my relationship with my Grandpa, although I am photographing and displaying the “visible” landscape, by creating images of a place that symbolizes something that happened/existed in the past, I am also creating images that shows what “underlies the visible” landscape
  •  “Actually, a lot of the work that I have been dealing with in this place, over the last 5 years, has been to do with things dissolving, and dissolving out of a form in a way.”
    • When I first read this quote, I thought that the idea of things dissolving could greatly relate to the fading process that memories undergo over time
    • This quote therefore relates to my FMP as I am trying to reconnect to my deceased Grandpa through triggering personal fading (or “dissolving”) memories of him, by revisiting the landscape that the memory was acquired in
  •  “Photography is kind of tied up with death, in many respects, in terms of looking at absent moments that are no longer there – it’s quite a lot to do with loss and holding on…”
    • This quote largely relates to my FMP due to a number of different reasons
    • My project obviously looks into the ideas of “death” and “loss” as it is the death and loss of my Grandpa that has resulted in the creation of this project
    • It also relates to the idea of “holding on” through the fact that I want to try and reconnect with (or “hold on” to) my Grandpa by attempting to trigger the recollection of personal memories that contain his presence, through revisiting and photographing the landscapes that we experienced together – the idea of recalling these personal memories also shows that my project looks at the idea of “absent moments that are no longer there”, as memories are moments that have been encountered in the past which, obviously, are no longer experienced in the present except through our personal memories
  •  http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/the-secret-life-of-the-riverbed-1196767.html
    • “There was so much baggage and theory with camera-based photography, I wanted to simplify it and make the connection between image and subject as close as possible”
    • “It is “as close as you could get to lying under the water yourself”.”
      • Both of these quotes discuss ideas on how Derges wanted to create pieces of work that were in close connection to the landscape/place that she was basing her work on
      • Although, as previously stated, I will not be using the technique that Derges employs throughout her different collections, I feel that this idea of being close to the landscape through the creation of the project can greatly relate to my FMP, as I am planning on revisiting, encountering and experiencing the locations numerous times throughout the projects development

 

Jem Southam:

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  • http://www.seesawmagazine.com/southam_pages/southam_interview.html
    • “The idea [walking] was to experience the English landscape in a slow way, which I certainly did.”
      • This quote obviously suggests the methodology that Southam underwent throughout the creation of his projects, but, when reading this quote I thought that it could also relate to my FMP
      • This is because, through revisiting the locations that I am focusing on throughout my project, I will obviously be walking in the landscape which allows me to experience it in a “slow way”, enhancing the reconnection aspect of the project by enabling me to spend more time reminiscing about my Grandpa through the memories that are triggered into recollection
    • “I eschew grandeur for the sake of it, preferring to revel in a subtler scale and history. But there’s still an epic story to be told, which exists wherever humans have made their homes.”
      • When I first read this quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP
      • This is because, like Southam, instead of photographing sublime landscapes (the “grandeur”), I am instead going to be focusing my project on the “subtler scale” documentary of beautiful and aesthetically pleasing landscapes
      • With this being said, as suggested in this quote, these “subtler scaled” landscapes still hold “an epic story to be told”, which can relate to the idea that I am telling a personal story regarding my reconnection to my Grandpa through the memories I recall by photographing the subtle landscapes that represent them
    • “Furthermore, I have always worked with texts as well, and both the content and form of these need to be worked through, in relation to the pictures.”
      • When reading this quote, I obviously thought that it related to my FMP through my considerations of using text within my final exhibition piece in order to enhance the audiences accessibility (suggested in my original proposal – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”)
      • This therefore made me think about the fact that, as suggested by Southam, I will need to dedicate a similar amount of time to the creation of text that I will use to accompany my photographs
    • “My overall artistic intentions are to make work that explores how our histories, our memory, and our systems of knowledge combine to influence our responses to the places we inhabit, visit, create, and dream of.”
      • The main idea that I took away from this quote is the idea of making work that explores people’s “memory” (as well as “history” and “knowledge”) and how this influences an individuals response to a particular place
      • When looking at this simplified version of the quote, I therefore feel that it greatly relates to my FMP, as I am using my own personal memories to influence how I see and respond to the specific locations I have chosen within the Lake District
    • “Regarding my strategy, well it’s simple. Once fixed on a site, I revisit it regularly, and gradually assemble a body of work that is a response to a slow absorption of the site, through the making of photographs, as well as through discussions that I have with those who live nearby, the examination of maps and other documents that relate to it, and so on.”
      • When I read this quote, I realized that Southam’s strategy greatly related to the methodology I am undergoing throughout my FMP – where I am revisiting a location regularly to create my collection of photographs, whilst also having discussions with my Dad regarding the context of the project, and using maps (as well as other documents such as my Grandpa’s photographs) that also relate to the project
    • “I make work, and at the time I have absolutely no idea why anybody would be interested in my serial photographs of rockfalls – it baffles me. But they [curators and editors] help to put it into a form that might engage others. Over the years I have realized that no one is going to really comprehend exactly what it is that an artist has been thinking about throughout the production of work…”
      • When I read this quote I thought that it, too, could relate to the feedback I have received, suggesting that my project is “too personal” and that it needs to be made “more accessible to the viewer” (suggested by both Matt Johnston and Anthony Luvera in numerous one-to-one and formative feedback session – please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Getting the “Go Ahead” (One-to-One Tutorial with Matt Johnston)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 2 (One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)” blog posts)
      • This quote could therefore be used as an argument against this feedback, as it is suggesting that not all viewers will “comprehend exactly what it is that an artist has been thinking about throughout the production of work”, and that, although I may not know how viewers will perceive my project, I should still pursue the path that I wish to take my project down
      • However, the idea suggesting that it is the curators and editors thathelp to put it [the project] into a form that might engage others” could also be used to suggest that it is our tutors (including Matt and Anthony) that provide us with feedback to allow us to make the project more engaging and accessible to our viewers (as we don’t have access to curators and editors)

 

  •  http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/l/landscape-photography-jem-southam/
    • “He observes the balance between nature and man’s intervention and traces cycles of decay and renewal.”
      • Looking at this quote, I feel that these ideas (of the relationship between nature and man as well as looking at traces of decay and renewal) can relate to my FMP
      • This is because, throughout my project I am obviously looking into the relationship between myself (“man”) and the landscape (“nature”) through photographing places that I associate with some of my personal memories of my Grandpa
      • I also feel that this project can also relate to the idea of looking at traces of decay and renewal in a more metaphorical sense – what I mean by this, is that, throughout my project, I am looking into reconnecting with my fading (or “decaying”) memories of my Grandpa, and these particular memories will appear stronger (or “renewed”) through revisiting particular places in the Lake District that trigger the recollection of these memories
    • “His work combines topographical observation with other references: personal, cultural, political, scientific, literary and psychological.”
      • When I read this quote, I thought that it could relate to my FMP through the simple fact that I am, too, using “topographical observation” (through the photographic documentation of particular places within the Lake District), as well as referencing “personal” and “psychological” aspects within my project (by exploring the idea of reconnecting to my Grandpa through the triggered recollection of personal memories that these places provide)

 


 

Iain Sinclair (Psychogeography and Walking) (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015):

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I look into theories from Iain Sinclair regarding psychogeography.

  • Now, although he suggested that I should read some of his books, unfortunately, when looking at the books of his that I had access to, I couldn’t see the relevance in relation to my FMP
  • I therefore decided to find some video interviews with him where he discussed some of his theories, including the primary idea of psychogeography
  • Below you will therefore be able to find the title of the video that I watched (along with the link to the site that I got it from), an embedded copy of the video, along with reflections on some of the ideas mentioned:

 

Rachael Cooke Interviews Iain Sinclair”:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2009/feb/08/iain-sinclair-interview

  • Information Sourced from Accompanying Text:
    • “This is what I feel about this landscape. I’ve walked out into it so often that it accepts me. Bits of stone and river accept me, and I know myself by that. If the landscape changes, then I don’t know who I am either. The landscape is a refracted autobiography. As it disappears you lose your sense of self.”
      • When I read this particular section of the accompanying text, I automatically related it to my FMP as Sinclair is essentially discussing the idea of feeling like a part of a landscape and how landscapes can play a major role in our personal identity
      • This therefore links to my FMP, because the landscapes that I am exploring within the Lake District obviously hold a great sense of personal identity for me, as it is the place itself that acts as a trigger to my memories and therefore my past – I am a part of the landscape through the fact that it can hold my memories
      • In relation to the idea of the landscape changing/disappearing and how this can make you “lose your sense of self”, I also think this can relate to my FMP, because, if the landscapes that I use as memory triggers change, it therefore means that it is less likely to trigger my past memories, meaning that I cannot recall as much of my past as I initially could – I experience a sense of “loosing my [past] self”
  • Information Sourced from the Video:
    • “I kept an 8mm film diary for seven years, and what has it amount to? Strategies for avoiding engagement, elective amnesia, dream paths that keep me submerged in the dream.”
      • What I took away from this particular quote, is that photographs provide individuals with “elective amnesia” through only documenting one part of a memory (which allows other details associated with the past event to fade more so than those in the photograph), whilst also suggesting that these photographs can act as a path (“dream path”) to an individuals preconscious memories (“the dream”)
      • This can therefore relate to my FMP, because I am personally exploring the act of “elective amnesia” by choosing only one (present) landscape photograph to represent the whole of my personal memory – however, I am also planning on including accompanying text to enhance the details of the memory that the photograph may not symbolize
      • I am also looking into this idea of “dream paths” and remaining “submerged in the dream” as I am physically walking (and documenting) different paths that submerge me in my past through documenting different memories (or “dreams”)
    • “You were engaging with the landscape, you were walking through Hackney”
      • Although this particular quote is talking about Hackney specifically, the main section that I took away from this quote is that walking provides individuals with a way of engaging with the landscape
      • This is essentially what I am doing for my FMP, because I am walking down different paths (that have been walked by Grandpa and I) as a way of not only engaging with the present landscape, but as a way of engaging with my past memories
    • “Out of the shadows, creep people who take these sort of surviving walls and turn them into their independent galleries, which the most extraordinary forms of art start to appear… They just appear over night as a sort of window dressing of the city, and this is the kind of combination of fiction and documentation that I’ve tried to tap into in writing this book.”
      • Once again, although this quote is discussing graffiti in Hackney, the main section that I took away from it was the second part where Sinclair discusses the idea that it “is the kind of combination of fiction and documentation that I’ve tried to tap into in writing this book”
      • This is because I feel that this part of the quote could link to my FMP as, through both the photographs that I create and the text that I write, I too am experimenting with a combination of conceptual aspects (or “fiction” – i.e. my memories) and the documentation of the places that hold these conceptual ideologies
    • “Initially, I was simply going to call the book “Hackney: A Fiction”, because I think Hackney is a place of self-generating mythologies. Everybody has their own versions of what the story is.”
      • Again, although this quote focuses on Hackney itself, I was personally drawn to the concept he was insinuating regarding the fact that “everybody has their own versions of what the story is”
      • This section could obviously relate to my FMP because I could use it to represent the fact that I am using this project to share my personal versions of the events in the past through my memories that I recall, but I could also use it to relate to how the audience may react to my FMP piece and adapt it to say that everybody has their own versions of what the story is, meaning that they will interpret my work differently depending on their own personal background
    • “My method for writing, really, is to simply wander about, put yourself in the right place and wait for somebody to contact you, to give you the next chapter.”
      • When I heard this particular quote, I automatically thought that it could relate to my FMP as, although it is discussing the practice of writing, I feel that the methodology he described could relate to the photographic (and textual) aspect of my project
      • What I mean by this is that I could adapt the quote to say: “My method for photography, really, is to simply wander about, put yourself in the right place and wait for the landscape to contact you, to give you the next chapter.” – For my FMP, I am walking down paths in the Lake District that connect and “contact me” be triggering different memories surrounding my Grandpa, and it is this that I am basing the creation of my project on

 

“Iain Sinclair – Interview for London Perambulator (Hackney, Psychogeography, Walking)”:

  • “Yeah, I think the whole business of deep typography or post psychogeography, or whatever it’s called, this solitary wandering, or communal wandering at the edge of a city has become really a major practice.”
    • What I took away from this quote is that psychogeography (which was the theory that Anthony suggested I looked at) is the solitary or communal wandering in a particular place, which has become a major practice
    • I therefore think that this theory of psychogeography greatly relates to my FMP, as I am taking part in the “solitary wandering” of different paths within the Lake District that allow me to recall and reconnect to past memories of my Grandpa (relating to the “psycho” aspect of “psychogeography”)
  • “It’s like a strange millennial compulsion to be there and to make some kind of record or response to things that are on the edge of disappearance.”
    • When I listened to this particular quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP as it is basically discussing the idea of wanting to create (or “record” and “respond”) a piece of work of different things “that are on the edge of disappearance” – I am essentially creating a piece of work by “recording” and “responding” to different landscapes within the Lake District that trigger the fading (or “disappearing”) memories I have of my Grandpa
  • “Walking becomes a form of practice, becomes a form of breathing and memory, touching the ground. It’s the way that narrative presents itself – I don’t think any other form engenders narrative in quite the same way.”
    • The main thing that I took away from this particular quote is the idea that walking is very important in terms of presenting different narrative through the physical touching of the ground that allows individuals to experience “breathing” and “memory”
    • This therefore relates to my FMP, as I am physically walking around the landscape, touching the ground that my Grandpa experienced, which triggers personal, fading memories that I have of him – it presents me with a narrative
    • I could also use this piece of academic information as inspiration towards the actual creation of my FMP images by perhaps suggesting that walking particular paths can enhance the memory (and reconnection) aspect of my project –I could therefore consider photographing the paths in which both me and my Grandpa experienced as a way of enhancing the projects aspect of personal reconnection
  • “Walking becomes the most natural form for lifting your consciousness.”
    • When I listened to this quote, I automatically noticed a connection between my FMP and the ideas that it discussed
    • This is because it is suggesting that walking allows individuals to “lift their consciousness” which could relate to my FMP, as I am using different walks through a variety of landscapes/down different paths to trigger (or “lift”) some of my preconscious memories into my consciousness

 


 

“Spectral Soundscapes: Exploring Space of Remembrance through Sound” by Iain Foreman (found when looking for research on Iain Sinclaie):

When I was looking into resources for my research into Iain Sinclair, I soon came across this particular article by Iain Foreman that I thought could relate to my FMP

  • This is because it obviously looks into ideas regarding the exploration of space in connection to acts of rememberance, but it could also link to research that I have conducted surrounding the inclusion of audio in photographic projects (please see under “Audio” in the blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research”)
  • Please note, although this academic article does relate to ideas regarding audio, I thought that it was more appropriate to place it in the “Academic Research” section
  • Below you will therefore be able to find a link to the online article, particular sections of the article that I though were relevant to my FMP, along with reflections on some of these ideas mentioned:

 

http://www.interferencejournal.com/articles/sound-methods/spectral-soundscapes-exploring-spaces-of-remembrance-through-sound

  • “… As John Drever observes, a kind of ‘love of place’, topophonophilia: the rapport, or affective bond between place, space, sentiment and sound (2007).”
    • When I read this particular quote, I though that it related to my FMP as it is essentially talking about the emotional (or “affective”) bond between “place, space, sentiment and sound”, or topophonophilia
    • I therefore feel that I am investigating the idea of this particular term in my FMP, as I am exploring my personal emotional connection to particular locations (or “places”) in the Lake District, that hold “sentimental” value through the fact that they trigger personal memories
    • With this being said, I therefore feel that if I were to suggest that I am looking into topophonophilia that, although I am looking into “place, space and sentiment”, in order to create a clearer connection to this term and my project, I should also include accompanying “sound” through experimenting with recording ambient noises or oral interviews (which I am planning on doing as a part of my experimentation process anyway)
  • “As this absence and loss resonates, spatial horizons recede, and in their place emerges a different temporality in which the spectral disrupts our embodied presence and we become affected by distance.”
    • Relating to the idea of absence and loss (that are two underlying themes I am exploring within my FMP), what I took away from this quote is that, as we begin to understand “this absence and loss”, our presence is affected and “disrupted” by the haunting (or “spectral”) and distance that we associate with the lost ones we begin to recall
    • This therefore links to my FMP, because I am essentially exploring this idea of an altered (or “disrupted”), present self through the landscape that I visit triggering my memories which allows me to experience a “haunting” and appreciate the distance between me and my past (and my Grandpa)
  • “By exploring the ways in which remembrance is expressed in a soundscape, in this article I shall suggest that an insistence on our immersive relationship with sounds has been at the expense of a distancing perspective in which the phenomenological connection of self and world is severed.”
    • The main aspect that I took away from this particular quote (although it may not be 100% accurate) is its suggestion that “our immersive relationship with sounds” is associated with “the phenomenological connection of self and world [being] severed” – in other words, a (“phenomenological”) connection between an individual and the world has been cut, so the immersive characteristic of sound has been created by us to try and fix this broken connection between self and world
    • Bearing this in mind, I therefore feel that this could briefly relate to my FMP as it is suggesting that an individual is connected to the world through the “use” of immersive sounds – it therefore links in with my exploration of landscapes (that obviously include ambient sounds), and I could perhaps use this theory to suggest that the inclusion of audio in my FMP will not only make it a more immersive experience for the viewer, but it could also be used to symbolize my personal use of listening to “immersive sounds” in order to trigger some of my past memories
  • “… It has forced me to think about different ways of recording sound: ways of documenting or representing this fragmented, dislocated, uncanny, haunted experience.”
    • When I read this particular quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP in a number of different way
    • Firstly, it is suggesting that Foreman was thinking about “ways of documenting or representing this fragmented, dislocated, uncanny, haunted experience”, which relates to my FMP, as I am essentially documenting (in a conceptual and representative sense) my personal past memories of my Grandpa (which are “fragmented” and “haunted” experiences of the past)
    • Secondly, although it is focusing primarily on sound, I could use this quote as inspiration for my FMP as a way of “forcing” me to “think about different ways of recording” these personal memories of mine (in order to represent the “fragmented, dislocated, uncanny, haunted experience” of my memories) – for example, through the use of accompanying features or output considerations
    • Finally, as suggested above in the first quote taken from this article, I also think that the fact that it talks about sound in this representative way, could provide me with inspiration to experiment with accompanying “sound” through the recording of ambient noises or oral interviews (which I am planning on doing as a part of my experimentation process anyway)
  • “… Exploring landscape and memory in terms of “absence, distance, displacement and the non-coincidence of self and world” (Wylie 2009 p. 279).”
    • When reading this particular quote, the main section that I took away from it was the idea of “exploring landscape and memory in terms of ‘absence [and] distance’” (mainly because I couldn’t quite figure out what the second section meant!)
    • Taking this into account, I therefore feel that the first section greatly relates to my FMP as I am exploring both landscapes and memories through revisiting locations in the Lake District that trigger my personal memories of my now deceased Grandpa – which relates to the idea of “absence” and also “distance” (these particular memories of him are way back in my past which looks at the idea distance in terms of the distance between the past and the present)
  • “This power, it is argued, derives from an understanding that “senses make place” (Feld 2005 p. 179) and that memory and the senses are densely intertwined.”
    • When reading this quote I thought that it not only greatly related to my FMP, but that it also linked to ideas that I discussed within my Symposium essay for my 350MC Working with Photography in Context module (as it suggests that “memory and the senses our intertwined”, it relates to my Symposium because, in my essay, I discussed ideas about our mind storing and recalling a variety of senses that are associated with particular memory in order to allow an individual to recall a denser fragmented memory)
    • The main thing that I’m going to take away from this quote is the idea that “sense make place” (as well as the fact that “memory and senses are densely intertwined”) and I am planning on using this obvious knowledge to provide me with a valid reason as to why I want to experiment with the inclusion of different sensual aspects to perhaps accompany my FMP photographs (including, for example, ambient noises or collected natural materials)
  • “… Parallel to a spectral geography, attempt, through phonography, to “bring to light things previously hidden or lost” (Wylie 2009 p. 279).”
    • This quote is essentially suggesting that, in relation to “spectral geography”, “phonography” or the inclusion of sound “bring[s] to light things previously hidden or lost”
    • This could therefore be helpful to include within my FMP as it is not only suggesting that sounds can be used to symbolize “the hidden and the lost” (in this case, the memories of my deceased Grandpa), but, once again, I could use it to provide viewers with a reason as to why I have experimented with the use of sound in accompanying my landscape photographs
  • “… Each type of ‘memorial’, however, shares an ontological concern for ‘presenting’, for making present…”
    • This idea greatly relates to my FMP, as I am basically looking into the idea of creating a photographic piece that can act as a “type of ‘memorial’” (for both my deceased Grandpa, and my fading memories), and, through the visual representation (as well as the ultimate exhibition) of this work, I will be “presenting” this memorial piece in an exhibition and online setting

 


 

“Photographies” Journal: “Photography, Archive and Memory” by Karen Cross and Julia Peck (suggested in one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I look into the “Photography, Archive and Memory” Special Edition of the “Photographies” Journal

  • Within this journal, he suggested that I read the introductory editorial written by both Karen Cross and Julia Peck, and that I should also read the essay entitled “Mum’s Got to Move House” by Michael O’Brien
  • Unfortunately, however, I was able to gain access to the introductory essay, but not the essay written by Michael O’Brien
  • With this being said though, within Karen Cross and Julia Peck’s introductory essay, they briefly mentioned Michael O’Brien’s “Mum’s Got to Sell the House” essay, and so I have used this particular descriptive paragraph as an insight to this suggested piece of work
  • Below you will therefore be able to find a PDF of the “Photography, Archive and Memory” editorial, particular sections of the article that I though were relevant to my FMP, along with reflections on some of these ideas mentioned, as well as a section dedicated to Michael O’Brien and his “Mum’s Got to Sell the House” essay (including my reflection on the paragraph):

 

Photography, Archive and Memory by Karen Cross and Julia Peck

 

  • “Photography, archive and memory are intimately connected. Memory and photography both involve the process of recording images that may be used to recall the past.” – Page 127
    • When reading this quote I thought that it not only greatly related to my FMP, but that it also linked to ideas that I discussed within my Symposium essay for my 350MC Working with Photography in Context module (as it is discussing the connection between photography and memory through the fact that they both “record images that may be used to recall the past”, it relates to my Symspoium because, in my essay, I discussed ideas surrounding how individuals can use (landscape) photographs to trigger different memories in order to help them recall the past)
    • It therefore also greatly relates to my FMP, as I am essentially looking into this connection between “photography” and “memory” (as well as the “archive” through the inclusion of archival aspects such as my Grandpa’s photographs and collected materials) by “recording images” that not only visually represent some of my past memories, but “may [also] be used [sometime in the future] to recall the past”
  • “Memory itself is often characterized as an archive: a store house of things, meanings and images. This gives the impression that one can appeal to memory in order to recover the past.” – Page 127
    • This quote also relates to both my FMP and my Symposium (as, within my Symposium essay, I discussed the brains definition as a “storehouse” for memory (including “things, meanings and images”) that can later be called upon “in order to recover the past”)
    • In relation to my FMP, however, the main section that I am going to take away from this particular quote is this idea that “memory is often characterized as an archive” – This particular section could therefore be used to suggest a connection between memory and (photographic) archives and, when looking at my FMP, could be used to suggest that my project is looking into the creation and accumulation of a visual archive (including photographs I have made as well as my Grandpa’s photographs and collected materials), in order to symbolize the memories I recall: I am creating a visual memory archive
  • “Memory is, in a sense, designed and shaped by the laws and practices of the present, which provide the structures for remembrance to take place.” – Page 127
    • When I read this quote, I thought it greatly related to my FMP as it is talking about a connection between the past (or “memory”) and the present (including “laws and practices”) which provide individuals with appropriate information (or “structures”) “for remembrance to take place” – in other words, it is suggesting that aspects in the present relate to those that have been experienced in the past which can trigger the recollection or remembrance of particular memories (also discussed in my 350MC Working with Photography in Context module)
    • I therefore feel that this particular quote relates to my FMP as I am including aspects from the present (including created photographs and collected materials) that represent the memories I recall, which therefore allows me to not only communicate a personal memory to different viewers, but also allows me to personally undergo the process of “remembrance”
  • “… Photography works to both enact and destroy “mnemonic experience” (Buchloh).” – Page 127
    • When I read this particular quote, I thought that it related to my FMP as, although it is suggesting that photography can both “enact and destroy” an individuals memory (or “mnemonic experience”) – which is a major discussion surrounding photography and memory as it suggests that the photograph has the ability to replace the wider memory the individual holds to a narrowed version of the event that has been captured within frames of a photograph – I though that the term “mnemonic experience” and it’s connection to photography was relevant to discuss
    • The term “mnemonic experience” is simply suggesting the experience of the memory that the individual holds (including the creating, encoding, storing, and in particular, the recalling of the particular memory – also discussed in my Symposium essay for my 350MC Working with Photography in Context module) and its connection to photography relates to my FMP as I am essentially looking into photographic practice as a way of enhancing or representing the “mnemonic experience” I encounter that relates to my deceased Grandpa
  • “On the one hand, it [photography] promises to create the conditions for social consciousness and remembrance, furnishing us with a potentially indiscriminate store of images… On the other hand, photography filters and mediates what is preserved. Through its association with mass culture, photography has been viewed as a process that results in the devastation of memory.” – Page 127
    • I thought this quote would be relevant to discuss in conjunction with my FMP as, like briefly stated above, it not only discusses photography and its positive connection to memory (including the use of photographs to enhance an individuals memory, or the “creation of conditions for social consciousness and remembrance, furnishing us with a potentially indiscriminate store of images) but it also discusses the negative relationship between photography and memory (where photographs can be seen to replace a wider memory that the individual holds with a narrower version of the memory through the use of the photographic frame as a condensing tool, i.e. “photography has been viewed as a process that results in the devastation of memory”)
    • I therefore thought that it would be useful to know the two relationships (both positive and negative) between photography and memory when continuing with the development of my project, as I will need to understand both theories in order to allow me to create and contextualize my FMP (veering it closer to the positive connection but being able to knowledgably argue against suggestions made about my project in relation to the negative relationship with photographs and memory)
  • “… Memory appears to have been torn and as a result we busy ourselves with defining “sites of memory” and attributing objects of the past with symbolic significance. Modern memory, Nora claims, is “archival”: “It relies entirely on the materiality of the trace, the immediacy of the recording, the visibility of the image”.” – Page 131
    • When I read this quote I thought that it greatly related to my FMP for a number of different reasons
    • Looking at the beginning section of this quote where it discusses the idea that memory has been “torn” (relating to the ideas of fragmented recollection and how memories are only ever recollected in snippets) as well as the fact that it suggests individuals look for particular sites (“of memory”) or objects of the past in order to aid in the recollection of the memory though their “symbolic significance”, this clearly relates to my FMP as I am looking into the photographic documentation of particular landscapes that are associated with my memories (or “sites of memory”) and archives (or “objects of the past”, including my Grandpa’s old photographs and collected materials) in order to create a piece of work that attains “symbolic significance” in reference to my personal memories of my Grandpa
    • Now, when looking at the second section of this quote, where Nora suggests that modern memory is made up of the materiality of the trace, the immediacy of the recording, the visibility of the image” (i.e. it is “archival”), this too relates to my FMP as I am looking into the “materiality of the trace” through the revisiting of these particular significant locations and collecting varying materials as well as looking into my Grandpa’s old photographs, “the immediacy of the recording” by visiting these locations that trigger different memories and (“immediately”) recording visual representations of the memories that have just been triggered (through conceptual landscape photography), and also “the visibility of the image” through the simple creation of these representational conceptual landscape photographs
  • “… The past is secured through the solidity of the sites constituted as locations of memory.” – Page 131
    • This quote greatly relates to my FMP as it is suggesting that the “solidity” of the landscapes or “sites of memory” secure the past as they act as powerful memory triggers (also discussed within my Symposium essay in my 350MC Working with Photography in Context module)
    • It therefore relates to my FMP as it can be used provide further evidence as to my reasoning behind focusing primarily on my personal LANDSCAPE memory triggers rather than the inclusion of varying mnemonic triggers including different objects (as well as the fact that I wanted to focus on landscape photography as it was my Grandpa who introduced my passion to this particular photographic style)
  • “Through the use of images, the past can possibly be revealed in more accessible forms, but this changes the way in which we encounter stories and which aspects of the past get narrated.” – Page 131
    • When I read this quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP, especially the feedback that I have received suggesting that my project is “too personal” and needs to be made “more accessible to the viewer” (suggested by both Matt Johnston and Anthony Luvera in numerous one-to-one and formative feedback session – please see in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Getting the “Go Ahead” (One-to-One Tutorial with Matt Johnston)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 2 (One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)” blog posts)
    • This is because the beginning of this quote is simply suggesting that “through the use of images, the past can possibly be revealed in more accessible forms”
    • However, with this being said, when moving on to the second part of the quote, it is essentially suggesting that, through the use of images, the photographer or creator of the images (“the narrator”) has the ability to choose “which aspects of the past get narrated”, which therefore “changes the way in which we encounter stories”
    • This section therefore relates to my FMP as, due to the fact that I am the “narrator” of this particular project, I obviously get to choose which memories I want to share within my project, which will obviously change the way in which the viewers encounter my personal story as I can manipulate it to seem more positive or negative through the selective inclusion and exclusion of different memories – now, although I have already carefully considered the (locational) memories I wish to share with the audience (based on the strength of the memory that is recalled), I will use this new suggestion to continue my careful consideration in order to allow me to create a more “open” (rather than “closed” or “one-sided”) representation of my memories and the relationship I held with my Grandpa
  • “While the structures of memory lead us to the personal, images do not offer straightforward representations of history or subjectivity…” – Page 133
    • When I read this quote, I thought that it greatly related to my FMP as it not only (briefly) suggested ideas regarding personal memories, but it also talked about the idea that “images do not offer straightforward representations of history or subjectivity”
    • This therefore relates to my FMP as I am using landscape photography in a conceptual sense in order to create representations of my past memories, therefore meaning that they are not “straightforward representations of history or subjectivity” and that I am simply creating images that can symbolize the memory that I recall rather than trying to document it precisely

 

Michael O’Brien:

  • “The productive nature of reappropriating the past through a conscious and purposeful staging of “memory work” is undertaken by Michael O’Brien in his visual essay “Mum’s Got to Sell the House”. The collaborative action research project undertaken with his Mother focused on a dialogic renewal of the family. The family archive is utilized in the project to allow O’Brien to revisit the family’s former selves. The decaying home rendered in O’Brien’s photographs stands in stark contrast to the warm glow of stereotypical family albums, and his representations of home are far from idealized in this way. Maybe home is no longer the refuge it once used to be. The camera functions here to repeat, reinscribe and subsequently release the family into a new space of dialogue and in this process, a new family archive is reflexively and consciously constituted for the future. O’Brien demonstrates how the sometimes difficult process of negotiating memory with other family members can bring into relief differing versions of the past. It is the process of creating a space for a psychodynamic negotiation of making meaning that enables the idealized family album to become contested and for memory to be interrogated in the present. For O’Brien, photography becomes the vehicle for the critical examination of where and what “home” is, and, by extension, his identity and history.” – Page 134
    • After I had read this paragraph regarding Michael O’Brien’s “Mum’s Got to Sell the House” project, I soon realized why Anthony had suggested that I look at it for my FMP
    • As suggested in the paragraph above, this project looks into personal identity and history as O’Brien uses photography as a way to “critically examine” and represent his past history and memories – this greatly relates to my FMP as I am representing my past history and memories by creating conceptual landscape images of the places that trigger certain memories relating to my Grandpa
      • (Within this paragraph, it is also suggested that O’Brien uses “representational” photography throughout his project in order to create a piece of work that looks at the particular theories discussed above, which too relates to my FMP as I am using representational or conceptual landscape photography in order to capture the story and memories I wish to portray)
    • However, when looking at the more detail description and analysis of O’Brien’s work, I soon realized that his project related to my FMP through a number of different methodological techniques and mnemonic theories explored
      • Looking at the sections where it says: “the family archive is utilized in the project to allow O’Brien to revisit the family’s former selves” relates to my FMP as I am exploring my past self by creating representational landscape images of the locations (and collecting archival aspects such as Grandpa’s old photographs) that trigger the recollection of memories that include not only my Grandpa, but also my “past [younger] self”
      • Another section that I thought related to my FMP was where it said: “the camera functions here to repeat, reinscribe and subsequently release the family into a new space of dialogue and in this process, a new family archive is reflexively and consciously constituted for the future” – This is because I am repeating personal experiences through the recollection of past memories and I am using the camera as a tool to representationally document these areas of mnemonic repetition; through the creation of these new conceptual landscape photographs, I am also creating a “new family archive” that can be called upon in the future to trigger certain memories regarding the creation of this particular project
      • Finally, the last section that I though related to my FMP was where it suggested that “O’Brien demonstrates how the sometimes difficult process of negotiating memory with other family members can bring into relief differing versions of the past” as, like suggested by Caroline Molloy in a one-to-one session on 11th February 2015 (and discussed in my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Process and Development” blog post), I am planning on conducting an interview with my Dad regarding the places that I have chosen to document throughout my project and the difference in the personal memories that we both share of these particular places

 


 

Walking” by Henry David Thoreau (suggested in a on-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 11th March 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 11th March 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Henry David Thoreau

  • After doing some brief research into him, I soon found that he had written an essay called “Walking” and, from the title, I thought that this particular piece of work would be relatively beneficial to read for my FMP
  • However, after reading this essay, I soon realized that there weren’t actually any quotes that I could take from the piece to apply to my FMP, so, instead, I have decided to reflect upon the main themes discussed within the work and the particular writing style that Thoreau used, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP (these can be found below alongside the link that I used to read the “Walking” essay):

 

http://www.bartleby.com/28/15.html

 

Main Themes Discussed:

  • “Walking” was written by Henry David Thoreau in 1862 and explores philosophical ideologies associated with the overarching theme of “Walking”
  • Some of the main ideologies discussed within this essay include:
    • The “Art of Walking” including the joys of taking part in this particular physical activity, and the affect that the experience has on an individuals spirit
    • Walking and it’s relationship to thought, including how this physical act can enhance an individuals philosophizing tendency’s making it a productive and beneficial activity to be undertaken by individuals in creative industries (including writers and artists)
  • However, although some of the more specific themes discussed within this essay (under the overarching theme of “Walking”) seem as though they would be relatively helpful to discuss in relation to my FMP, due to the writing style undertaken by Thoreau, I found it rather difficult to understand the concepts and ideologies he discussed in full
  • This has therefore influenced my decision to focus this section of my research on the reflection of the style of writing and the essay itself (which can be found below)

 

Style of Writing and the Book Itself:

  • As suggested above, this particular essay by Thoreau was written in 1862 which meant that the writing style presented resembles that of Old English
    • Although this essay is clearly written in the English language (meaning that it should be easy for me to understand), the Old English that he uses is a very different style to what I am used to analyzing, which enhanced the challenge of understanding what has been discussed
  • However, with this being said, I was still able to gain an understanding of the structure of his writing and have managed to identify the fact that he writes about personal experiences before informing them with his contextual understanding of the history and philosophy surrounding the “Art of Walking” (making the personal experiences more accessible to the viewer)
    • Now, although this essay has been written in Old English, which, as stated above, enhances the challenge of analytical and critical understanding, this particular historical style has the capability to successfully balance the personal experiences with the academic philosophies discussed which creates an informed but poetic piece of work
    • At intervals within this particular essay, Thoreau also incorporates some of the poems he has written in association with the personal experience he is discussing at the time – this offers the reader evidence as to Thoreau’s personal writing skills (which have been identified as Harvard Classic’s), whilst also offering them a slight, poetic release from the more philosophical and academic ideologies he has suggested

 

FMP Inspiration

  • Looking back over Henry David Thoreau’s “Walking” essay, although some of the themes discussed within the article could briefly relate to my FMP, I soon found that the main inspiration I gained from reading this particular piece of work related to the style of writing that he used
    • This wasn’t the idea of using Old English language, or incorporating specific examples of poems within his writing, but was rather the more generalized idea of creating an informed piece of writing that includes both personal experiences and academic, philosophical ideologies – this is because, although Thoreau did this textually, I want to try and create a piece of work that balances the personal with the academic in order to, as stated above, create a more accessible project for the viewer through providing them with a contextualized understanding of the personal aspects within my project

 


 

“Where to? Steps Towards the Future of Walking Arts” Symposium (suggested by Anthony Luvera via email on the 24th March 2015)

On the 24th March 2014, I received an email from Anthony Luvera including information about this particular Walking Arts Symposium that was taking place on Thursday 16th April (9am-9pm) at Falmouth University

https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/whereto

Symposium Email

  • Unfortunately, although looking at the title of the Symposium I thought that it would be relatively helpful for research for my FMP, I made the conscious decision not to attend this particular event for a number of reasons:
    • Due to the date that this event is held on, in relation to my FMP module schedule, I personally feel that (as it is only a month before the deadline) this is too late to be conducting further research, and that I should have a finalized idea and concept at this particular point in time
    • I also feel that, after conducting the research into the 50+ academic and photographic resources I have been given by varying lecturers over the FMP module, that I have a sufficient amount of research in order to create a successful, contextualized piece of work that meets the modules learning objectives
    • Also, after looking into information regarding the address and travel arrangements that I would need to make to go to the event, even if I did decide to go, it would actually take me several hours to get from either Coventry or home, both there and back, meaning that I would only be able to attend for a couple of hours in the early afternoon due to the travel schedule – I therefore feel that the travelling time involved could be more usefully used in the finalization of my FMP

 

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