352MC Fifth Trip to the Lake District (Friday 3rd April – Monday 6th April 2015)

On Friday 3rd April 2015, I travelled up to the Lake District with my Mum for our fifth and final weekend trip (as, unfortunately, my Dad was unable to make the sixth trip we had scheduled in). Similar to the previous two trips up to the Lake District (please see the blog posts entitled “325MC Fourth Trip to the Lake District (Thursday 12th March – Saturday 14th March 2015)” and “325MC Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), deviating away from my original plan of completing this project with my Dad he was unfortunately able to make this weekend which meant that, once again, Mum kindly decided to take me up so that I didn’t waste any precious time shooting on location. As with the previous trips, below you will be able to find information regarding the weather for the weekend (researched prior to departure), the original plan for the weekend (including a brief introduction to the plan, the equipment I took with me, the locations I wanted to visit, and a rough idea of the shots I wanted to take), whether the plan for the weekend changed (and the reasons why it changed), notes that I took about the project that I thought of during the weekend whilst also discussing them with my Mum (which have been split into “general” and “technical” notes), a contact sheet of the photographs that I took over the weekend (from both the Canon 5D Mk II and the Mamiya 7), and, finally, a reflection on the images and the trip:

 


 

Weather:

Trip 5 Weather

 


 

Plan for the Weekend:

The plan for this weekend was essentially exactly the same as the previous two trips up to the Lake District (as already stated, please see the blog posts entitled “325MC Fourth Trip to the Lake District (Thursday 12th March – Saturday 14th March 2015)” and “325MC Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”): where I wanted to create aesthetically pleasing landscape images (that also had a documentary aesthetic) of a number of different paths that I have walked with my Grandpa in the past (as a way of enhancing the reconnecting aspect of the project, as suggested by David Moore – please see blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 3 (Practitioner Talk and a Group Tutorial with David Moore, and a Self-Learning Workshop)”), through the use of a particular “middle-of-the-road” composition (for more information, please see “Planned Shots” below). However, as this was my last trip up to the Lake District, this obviously put quite a bit of pressure on me to achieve successful shots but, if I do not manage to achieve these, I feel that I have a number of strong images from my previous trips that I could use as back ups.

(Also, please note, the images that I created on this weekend were mainly shots that I had scouted for during previous trips up to the Lake District)

However, deviating away from the previous trip, I have decided to abandon the idea of experimenting with a “loosely controlled methodology” (as suggested by Anthony Luvera in a one-to-one session on 11th March – please blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”), as I personally feel that the use of a “middle-of-the-road” aesthetic not only documents the methodology behind the projects creation (walking down the paths that I walked with my Grandpa), but also holds a symbolic representation which could be used to reference the mnemonic pathway my mind undergoes when I recall these particular memories of my Grandpa. On the other hand, with this being said, I still decided continue with the capturing of video and audio of ambient noises in order to allow me to experiment with creating videos, cinemagraphs and immersive soundscapes later in my development (as it’s better to have too much data that I don’t want to use than not enough that I eventually do want to use!) – please note, all of these experimentations where either suggested in the varying proposals that I have written, or have been suggested in numerous feedback sessions (please see under the appropriate blog posts entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 6 (Practitioner Talk and a Group Tutorial with David Rule, and a One-to-One Tutorial with Caroline Molloy)”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”, or “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)” – these future experiments will be shown in a separate blog post under titles that include the word “Experiment”).

 

Technical Equipment (and Methodology):

  • Canon 5D Mk II (with charger and 32GB Compact Flash Card)
  • Tamron SP10-24mm (wide angle) lens
  • Canon EF 24-105mm lens – to be used to capture the experimental video aspects of the trip (including cinemagraphs) as it is a slightly more appropriate lens and focal length for this particular (video) medium
  • Mamiya 7
  • Mamiya 7 80mm lens
  • Fuji Pro 400 H Colour Film (ISO 400)
  • 77mm Ultra-Violet Filter (for the Tamron SP10-24mm lens)
  • 58mm Ultra-Violet Filter (for the Mamiya 7 80mm lens)
  • Tripod
  • Edirol R09 (and Microphone) – in order to capture the ambient noises that I will consider using within future soundscape, video, and cinemagraph experimentations
  • Kenneth Cole Reaction Instant 600 Polaroid Camera – to be used to capture the collaborative methodology behind the project (as suggested in both versions of my proposal – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”)
  • PX680 Impossible Project 600 Colour Polaroid Film
  • Sekonic L-308S Flashmate (light meter) (with spare batteries)
  • Low-Pro Waterproof Camera Bag
  • Measuring Tape – in order to measure where the centre of the path is so that I can attempt to make sure that the lens of the Mamiya 7 (rather than the body) is situated in the correct position for the “middle-of-the-road” composition

Also in regards to the methodology behind the use of equipment, similar to the previous two trips up to the Lake District, I spent the majority of the weekend shooting on the Canon 5D Mk II in order to gain appropriate settings and compositions, as well as digital “back-ups” of my images before moving on to capturing a finalized “official” photograph on the Mamiya 7.

However, in regards to the experimental aspects of the weekend (including capturing data for video, cinemagraphs and ambient soundscapes), I obviously used the Canon 5D Mk II (and Edirol R09), due to the fact that it not only saved precious film, but also because videos, cinemagraphs and audio could only be recorded digitally. Also, in regards to the equipment methodology for capturing the experimental video and cinemagraph data, the use of a tripod was imperative in order to achieve the “static style” that was suggested by Anthony (please see in the blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”), as well as the fact that, in order to create a successful cinemagraph in postproduction, you need to capture both a video and a photograph in the exact same place (hence the major importance of using a tripod).

 

Locations:

Whilst considering the locations to visit on this trip up to the Lake District, similar to the previous two trips I embarked on with my Mum, I obviously had to take into account the fact that she was slightly less fit than my Dad. However, as I knew that this was the last weekend trip up to the Lake District that I would be able to go on, I also needed to fit in all of the finalized locations that I created on my third trip up to the Lakes (please see in the blog post entitled “325MC Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”). Fortunately though, as this weekend was comprised of four days (rather than the previous two or three days), this actually meant that I was able to plan the weekend so that I could fit in all of the locations without it being too strenuous for either my Mum or me.

The plan that I came up with for this weekend can therefore be found below underneath the day that I planned on visiting them, along with any notes that I feel are relevant to include:

 

Day One (Friday 3rd April 2015):

  • Similar to the previous two trips with my Mum, on the first day, we got up to the Lake District slightly later than I did on the first two trips, as Mum said that she didn’t really have the energy to go up to the Lake District ridiculously early like I did with my Dad
    • However, as we were essentially spending an extra couple of days in the Lake District, we thought that going up slightly later on the Friday wouldn’t be much of a problem (and we also hoped that we’d missed most of the Bank Holiday traffic!)
  • Buttermere

 

Day Two (Saturday 4th April 2015):

  • Haystacks OR The Langdales (up to Stickle Tarn) and Loughrigg Tarn
    • Dependent on the weather – we will need to wait and see how dense and high the clouds are on the day because, as Haystacks is higher, it is more likely to be covered than The Langdales

 

Day Three (Sunday 5th April 2015):

  • Haystacks OR The Langdales (up to Stickle Tarn) and Loughrigg Tarn
    • Dependent on the weather – we will need to wait and see how dense and high the clouds are on the day because, as Haystacks is higher, it is more likely to be covered than The Langdales

 

Day Four (Monday 6th April 2015):

  • Surprise View
  • Latrigg

 

Planned Shots:

As suggested in the fourth trip up to the Lake District (please see the blog post entitled “325MC Fourth Trip to the Lake District (Thursday 12th March – Saturday 14th March 2015)”), although I had previously tested the “middle-of-the-road” composition due to the fact that the paths were slightly off-centre due to the rangefinder aspect of the Mamiya 7 (please see blog post “352MC Test Shoot Two – “Middle-of-the-Road” Compositional Technique with the Mamiya 7”), although I thought that I had carefully positioned tripod and the Mamiya lens in the centre of the path, this problem was still evident throughout my final photographs. However, as suggested in the previous two trips, if I cannot achieve the central alignment of the path at the source (i.e. taking the image), I will consider using my scanned negatives to create (and crop) my final prints.

In regards to the methodology that I used over the weekend, as briefly stated above, the use of equipment remained practically the same (where I took the photographs on the Canon 5D Mk II first to gain the correct settings and “back-up” images, before finalizing “official” photographs on the Mamiya 7, as well as capturing general aesthetically pleasing landscape photographs on the Canon 5D Mk II to provide me with another form of “back-up” imagery in case the projects progression required it in the future).

However, as this weekend also provided me with the opportunity to experiment with video and cinemagraphs (both of which were shot on the Canon 5D Mk II in order to save film and the fact that they needed to be shot digitally, as suggested above), I obviously varied the photographic methodology depending on the technique I was using.

Please note, as I knew that they were only experiments, I obviously spent more time focusing on the main aspects of my project (the “middle-of-the-road” photographs) and therefore spent less time capturing these pieces of data.

In regards to the video experimentations I simply decided to capture a variety of aesthetically pleasing and interesting natural places, formations, and processes, using a “static style” (as suggested by Anthony – please see in the blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 8 (Practitioner Talk by John Blakemore and a One-to-One Tutorial with Anthony Luvera)”) through the use of a tripod, as well as excluding filming movement such as zooming and panning. (Please note, I decided to use this particular methodology as I was able to gain inspiration after researching into Patrick Keiller’s work, which was suggested in the same one-to-one with Anthony Luvera – in order to see more in-depth research surround this particular artist, please see my “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post). For the cinemagraph aspect of experimentation, I decided to choose aesthetically pleasing landscape locations (including some of the paths that I was photographing for my “official” shots) that provided me slight movement, which could be isolated within the final cinemagraph outcome that I create.

As for the audio, although they are not necessarily “shots” I decided to record ambient noises provided by all of the locations where I took the “official” Mamiya photographs (so that the audio could possibly be paired with the images to create a more immersive piece, as suggested in both versions of my proposal – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal” and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”), the locations used within the video and cinemagraph experimentations (so that the audio can be paired with the visual data collected), as well as general natural noises that I thought were beautiful and intriguing to listen to (as I thought it was better to collect more data than was required in case I decide to use it in the future progression of my project).

 


 

Changed Plan:

Unfortunately, for a number of different reasons, the plan for this weekend did end up changing. Below you will be able to find the changed plan along with reasons and information as to why it changed (which can be found in italics):

 

Technical Change of Plan for the Weekend:

  • On the Canon 5D Mk II I changed from shooting on the Tamron SP10-24mm (wide angle) lens to the Canon EF 24-105mm lens
    • When we arrived on the Friday, as it was pouring with rain (suggested below), I considered leaving behind one of the lenses for the Canon 5D Mk II so that it didn’t attain water damage like the previous trip
    • I therefore decided to leave behind my Tamron SP10-24mm (wide angle) lens, and use the Canon EF 24-105mm lens, as, like previously suggested, I was only using the digital camera for achieving the correct settings and “back-up” images, as well as recording the video data (as suggested under the “Technical Equipment (and Methodology)” section of both this and the previous trip, I also wanted to use this particular lens for the video as I thought it would be more appropriate for the experiment, but was unable to use it during the last trip due to its attained water damage)
      • When using the Canon lens, as I was shooting the “test” images to achieve the correct settings, I also realized that it had the same focal length to the Mamiya 7’s 80mm lens (which, admittedly, I hadn’t noticed before), which therefore created similar compositions of the images, thus an easier comparison between the captured shots on both of the cameras

 

Day One (Friday 3rd April 2015):

  • Buttermere
    • Due to it being a Bank Holiday, our journey ended up taken two hours longer than normal (despite our thoughts that we would have missed the holiday traffic!) and so we didn’t end up getting to Buttermere until mid-afternoon
    • When we arrived, the weather was, once again, relatively poor which has most likely affected the quality of the images that I have captured
      • However, as this weekend was completely booked up with the other locations that I needed to shoot at (due to it being the last weekend), I was unable to return to the location to re-shoot but, thankfully, feel that I have a strong image that I could use from a previous trip for my final piece
      • With this being said though, as the weather was a lot better in this location compared to the previous trip (although it was still relatively poor), I actually ended up taking a variety of other “middle-of-the-road” shots that I hadn’t planned during my location scouting of the area
        • This is because, as the weather was so bad the previous weekend, I tended to keep my head down and focused on the protection of the equipment (which didn’t go as well as I had hoped if you recall!), and so I found that I had missed some photographic opportunities that I utilized in the slightly better weather this weekend
    •  On the other hand, due to the bad weather that we experienced, as a way of using my time productively, I decided to take this opportunity to capture video and audio data for future experimentations and possible use within my final piece
    • In relation to the Mamiya 7, on this particular day it is possible that I made a monumental mistake as, when I was changing one of my films, I realized that I hadn’t wound the film round enough, meaning that I am expecting the last shot (if not all of the film) to have been exposed, but we will obviously see the consequence of my mistake when my film gets developed
      • (However, if it is just the last couple of shots that have been affected, as you will see from the contact sheets, I usually take more than one shot in the same location and I also made sure that I re-shot the last photo on the film

 

  • Friday Evening
    • On Friday evening, I decided to look at the weather forecast (again) to see which of the days (out of Saturday and Sunday) would provide us with the better weather – this is because, as suggested above, as Haystacks is higher, it would need better weather so that the peaks weren’t covered by the clouds
    • When looking at this forecast, it appeared to suggest that the weather on the Sunday was due to be slightly better, which therefore meant that we decided to do Haystacks on the Sunday and The Langdales and Loughrigg Tarn on the Saturday
    • Whilst looking at the weather for Saturday and Sunday, I also looked at the weather for Monday and realized that it had changed from the previous forecast and that it was now due to have incredibly poor weather
      • We therefore decided that, if we had time, we would visit Latrigg on the Saturday after The Langdales and Loughrigg Tarn
      • (However, I wasn’t too fussed about trying to fit Surprise View in as well, as I personally feel that I have a successful shot, from this location, from the previous trip that I could use within my final piece)

 

Day Two (Saturday 4th April 2015):

  • The Langdales (Stickle Tarn)
    • As suggested above, as the Saturday was forecast to have (ever so slightly) poorer weather than the Sunday, we decided to do The Langdales as this was much lower down than Haystacks
    • On the day, the weather started out relatively well (cloudy with some sunshine, as forecast), so we decided to stop off at the scouted locations on the way up in order to take the “official” shots on the Mamiya, and that we would then re-take them on the way back down if the weather appeared better and therefore more aesthetically pleasing
    • However, the only problem with the nice weather (as well as the fact that it was a Bank Holiday weekend) was that everyone (and I mean everyone) was out on the mountains which made it very difficult to photograph the paths without any people on them
      • This therefore meant that each shot took a lot longer to capture than I had originally anticipated, so I either ended up compromising with having people in the distance of the photo (which, if I choose to use the scanned negatives to create my final piece, I can obviously easily edit out), or deciding to take the slightly riskier move of leaving the image until we came back down
      • Thankfully though, in regards to the images that I hadn’t successfully captured on the way up, I feel that I was very lucky on this particular occasion because, on the way back down, not only was the weather much better, but there were also points when there were no people in the photos that I wanted to capture
        • This also, therefore, affected my decision to actually re-shoot a number of my “successful” shots from the way up
  • Loughrigg Tarn
    • After a successful trip up to Stickle Tarn in The Langdales, we then went to Loughrigg Tarn as planned
    • Although a majority of the shots that I had planned to take around Loughrigg tarn appeared to have been captured relatively successfully, unfortunately, for one of my planned shots (looking down a path to the waters edge), I was actually unable to capture it – this is because there were a group of individuals that had set up for their fishing equipment for the day, right in the centre of the shot that I wanted to create, and, due to the amount of equipment that they had with them, I was therefore unable to ask them to move
      • We therefore decided that, if we had time (and the weather was okay) later in the weekend, we would try and return to Loughrigg Tarn in order to capture this one particular image
  •  Latrigg
    • As previously suggested, after looking at the forecast weather for the rest of the weekend on the Friday night, we decided to go to Latrigg on the Saturday if we had enough time after going to the two previously planned locations (due to the bad weather that was forecast on the Monday)
    • Unfortunately, at this point in the day (early evening), the weather had deteriorated (to relatively cloudy), which I feel may have affected the aesthetic quality of some of my images
      • However, the cloudy weather also created some dramatic spotlighting over a valley that was featured in one of my images, and I therefore think that this particular photograph should hopefully turn out successfully (but, once again, we will only really be able to tell once my film has been developed, scanned, and briefly edited!)

 

Day Three (Sunday 5th April 2015):

  • On the Sunday, I decided to stick with the plan that we had come up with on the Friday evening (that was dependent on the weather)
  • Haystacks
    • Thankfully the weather was glorious for the whole day that we were up Haystacks, but this obviously meant that, similar to the Saturday, we were expecting a lot of people to be up on the mountain
      • However, with this being said, at the beginning of the day I found that I was very lucky because, not only was the weather gorgeous, but there was also no one on the mountain which meant that I was able to capture the first couple of shots with ease
      • This therefore meant that I decided to try and get all of the shots, from each of the scouted locations, on the way up, as they would be easier to achieve with less people on the mountain and, with it being the Lakes, I knew that the weather could completely change within seconds
    • However, as the day went on, although the weather fortunately stayed the same, this obviously meant that more and more people started coming up the mountain
      • This therefore meant that, for my last couple of shots, I spent a lot more time trying to achieve people-less images (in some cases around an hour and a half) and, similar to the shoot up The Langdales the following day, meant that in some instances I decided to take some photographs wit individuals way in the distance
      • However, when I had set up all of my equipment, ready to take my shot, a number of people took an interest in what I was doing (so much so that one individual actually took away my business card!) and a couple of individuals even volunteered to walk down the path in order to kindly ask for some of the individuals that were in my shot to move round the corner and out of sight – and if those people are reading this, thank you ever so much!
    • As you will see from the contact sheet, after I had captured all of my images I then decided to head back down
      • On the way back down however, I decided to retake one of the shots I had previously captured on the way up as, on the previous occasion, I encountered trouble distinguishing the correct camera settings due to a problematic shadow in the foreground (which had obviously now moved round in the late afternoon sun)
  •  Sunday evening
    • On Sunday evening, we decided to discuss the plan for the following day and, as the weather is meant to be poor, we dicided to simply visit Surprise View as it was the last location on the list (and, as previously suggested, I thought I had captured a successful shot from this location on the previous trip)
      • However, if the weather turns out to be nice for the whole day, we decided that we would visit:
        • Surprise View
        • Latrigg (but only the most successful shot as I feel that the others are a lot less sticking, and we also want to try and fit in…)
        • Buttermere (as weather was poor on Friday)

 

Day Four (Monday 6th April 2015):

  • On Monday, although we thought we had come up with a plan the following evening (please see above), due to the dramatic change in the weather throughout the day, we actually ended up having to create a more spontaneous plan in relation to this (the locations that we visited can therefore be found below with extended descriptions as to why we changed the plan from the Sunday)
  • When we got up to leave on the Monday morning, we found that it was incredibly foggy weather in Keswick (with little more than 200m visibility), which simply confirmed the fact that it was a good idea to fit Latrigg in on the Saturday evening (as we couldn’t even see Latrigg from Keswick!)
  • Surprise View
    • However, although, as suggested above, the weather was relatively bad, I decided that I still wanted to visit Surprise View (that was on the original plan) as, like previous stated, I feel that I already have a successful shot from this location from the previous trip
    • I also wanted to experiment with the misty conditions in this particular location as I thought that it would add an interesting (and slightly ironic, due to the name of the place) representational aesthetic
  • Loughrigg Tarn
    • As you can see from the contact sheet included below, we then decided to go to Loughrigg Tarn as I had luckily remembered that, on the Monday, I was unable to capture one of the specific shots that I required due to some awkwardly placed fishermen
    • When we arrived in this particular location, the weather was better than that which we experienced in Keswick the same morning, but slightly worse than the weather we had experienced at Loughrigg Tarn on the Saturday
      • As this was the case, I therefore decided to simply capture the shot that I was “missing”as I felt that the other images from the trip to Loughrigg Tarn on the Saturday would have been more aesthetically pleasing due to the slightly better weather conditions
  •  Second Trip to Loughrigg Tarn
    • After the first visit to Loughrigg Tarn on the Monday, we then went into Ambleside to get some lunch before heading back
    • However, whilst we were there, the weather in this area of the Lake District had brightened up dramatically so, after lunch, Mum kindly agreed to take me back to Loughrigg Tarn in order to allow me to capture all of the shots from this location in better weather than we had experienced on the Saturday
    • (However, please note, we decided not to drive back to the other areas of the Lake District that I had captured in poorer weather, including Latrigg and Surprise View, as, like previously suggested, I feel that I have now achieved successful shots from both of these location and also know that, as they are in a different valley, the weather could be the complete opposite)

 


 

Notes from the Weekend:

Technical

Ambient Noise Audio Recording

  • After conducting primary research into how best to use the Edirol for the capturing of ambient data that I required (by talking to our technician Paul Adkins – please see more information in the blog post entitled “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Equipment and Editing Software Research”), the audio data that I captured on the Edirol, throughout this weekend, was of a much better quality to those that I captured previously

32GB Memory Card

  • Over the weekend, as suggested above under the “Technical Equipment (and Methodology)” section, I used a 32GB Memory Card for the Canon 5D Mk II that I thought would have been enough to have lasted for the whole of the Bank Holiday weekend
    • However, I actually forgot to take into account that we were obviously staying in the Lake District for a couple of extra days, whilst also taking videos for future experimentations
    • This therefore meant that I soon started running out of card space and so, after each day, I decided to delete some of the multiple “settings” shots I had created, whilst still keeping enough of them to provide evidence as to my technical methodology and experiments, in order to free up some card space

General Technical Notes

  • Although you may not be able to identify this from the contact sheets that I have included below (due to the fact that I had to delete some of my images to save space on my memory card, as previously suggested), over this weekend I actually found that I was taking less digital images to check the settings – this is because, through my continuous use of the equipment, I realized that I had finally started to get used to the technical side of photography as well as the equipment that I was using (better late than never!)

 


 

Photos – Contact Sheets (Canon 5D Mk II and Mamiya 7 (x16)):

Digital Contact Sheet:

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Canon 5D MK II Contact Sheet

 

Film Contact Sheets:

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 1

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 2

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 3

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 4

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 5

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 6

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 7

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 8

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 9

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 10

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 11

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 12

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 13

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 14

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 15

Fifth Trip to the Lake District – Mamiya 7 Contact Sheet 16

 

Please note, although I used this weekend to capture different experimental aspects, such as videos and ambient noises, these will be displayed below under the appropriate experimental sections that will discuss the methodology and output (including videos and cinemagraphs) that I created during the process of experimentation.

 

Developing and Editing:

In regards to the developing and editing of the images, this methodology remained exactly the same to the previous two weekends (please see the blog posts entitled “325MC Fourth Trip to the Lake District (Thursday 12th March – Saturday 14th March 2015)” and “325MC Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), and so, to jog your memory, I have therefore just included the key aspects below in a bullet point format (please note, any slight changes are represented in italics):

Canon 5D Mk II

  • Similar to the first trip (please see under the section “Photos”, “Editing” in the “352MC First Trip to the Lake District (Saturday18th – Sunday 19th October 2014)” blog post)
  • Shot in RAW format (as a way of capturing as much visual information as possible)
  • Didn’t edit them (or remove any photographs) and simply created a contact sheet from the original files

Mamiya 7

  • Shot on colour film – sent them off to a specialist company to be developed (as we don’t have colour processing equipment within the university)
  • Scanned them in university using the Hassleblad scanner (so that I could create a digital contact sheet of the photographs, allowing me to compare them to the digital contact sheets I created for the Canon 5D Mk II images)
  • Opened them in Photoshop for brief editing to create a relatively “correct” image, including:
    • Straightening
    • Cropping
    • Inverting (into a positive)
    • Automatically adjusting the:
      • Tone
      • Colour
      • Contrast
      • Levels
  • However, these edited images are still far from perfect (including the fact that the colour is still slightly off, the contrast is incredibly low, and the images appear overexposed) and so, if I decide that these images may be useful for my final exhibition piece in the future, I will take time looking through each of the images and selecting the stronger contenders, before appropriately editing them to a higher standard or sending them of for professional scanning and printing

 


 

Reflection – The Photographs and The Trip:

The Photographs:

As mentioned above, considering the fact that this was my last trip up to the Lake District, once the weekend was over, I soon started to feel the pressure regarding the required quality of the photographs that I needed in relation to each of the locations. However, luckily, similar to both the second and third trips up to the Lake District (please see the blog posts entitled “352MC Second Trip to the Lake District (Saturday 31st January – Sunday 1st February 2015)” and “352MC Third Trip to the Lake District (Friday 13th February – Sunday 15th February 2015)”), before I had my colour film developed from the Mamiya 7, when looking through my “back-up”, digital images, I thought that I had captured some strong, aesthetically pleasing shots. Once I had received my developed negatives, after scanning them in and editing them briefly in Photoshop, I then thought that the images I had captured were both strong in their aesthetic and conceptual quality (through their ability to reference the overarching themes and narrative of my project) and that I could easily use a selection of these within my FMP exhibition piece.

 

The Trip:

Looking back at the trip in general, although (as you will see from the contact sheet included above) I experienced a wide range of weather conditions that resulted in a altered plan for the weekend, as well as some slightly time consuming problems related to people in the shots, I personally feel that this trip was the most successful out of all of the trips that I have had up to the Lake District for this particular project. This is because, for around 70% of the time, the weather was the best we’ve experienced out of all of the trips and, although this was the reason for some of my people related problems, a majority of the individuals were incredibly understanding and willing to cooperate. This therefore resulted in me achieving most of the shots that I set out to achieve on this weekend (apart from Buttermere, but as previously suggested, I feel that I have already captured successful images that I could use for my final piece from this location).

This fifth and final trip up to the Lake District was easily the best one to end on, and, through the combination of images that I have achieved from this weekend, as well as some of the photographs that I have created from previous trips, I personally think that I have a selection of photographs that I can choose from in order to create a successful final piece that I will be proud of.

Advertisements