352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Presentation Options Research

As discussed in my one-to-one session with Anthony (on 14th January 2015 and 11th February 2015), I will be splitting my research into five suggested research groups (and three groups I feel may be appropriate): Academic, Location, Photographic, Technical, Representation of the Land, Personal, Equipment and Editing Software, and Presentation Options. (Please note: some of the resources included within these research sections can link to more than one of the research categories stated above. In this case, I have simply included them in the research section that suits the aspect of the work that I am looking at for my FMP).

This blog post is therefore dedicated to the research that I have conducted into different photographers/artists that can offer me inspiration with regards to the presentation and installation of their pieces of work. Most of the artists that I look at within this section were given to me after I had started to discuss a couple of installation ideas, and were suggested as pieces of research due to their association with the incorporation of different objects. Within this research section you will find the name of the photographers/artists and the projects that I have researched, examples of their work (if applicable), a link to their website, and brief reflections on their work followed by how I may use them as inspiration for my FMP.

 



 

Daniel Campbell Blight (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 15th April 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 15th April 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Daniel Campbell Blight

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look into Blight’s work in relation to his fictional writings associated with photography, and a recent exhibition that he curated for the Royal Collage of Art’s Photo London event
  • After conducting some brief research into both Blight’s work and the curated exhibition, I personally feel that I have enough previous research relating to styles of text (in a general use, as well as accompanying photographic pieces), so I therefore decided to focus this particular piece of research on some of the installation displays curated in his exhibition, in order to try and gain inspiration in relation to my presentation options
  • When looking at the works of each of the individuals included within this exhibition, I therefore spent time pinpointing the pieces and installations that I feel greatly relate to my FMP, and, as you will see from my analysis, I decided to focus this research on the presentation of ideas, rather than the aesthetics of the images
  • As you will see below, I have therefore included some brief inspiration surrounding the exhibitions concept, before moving on to provide a brief analysis of some of the individuals work, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

 

The Photo London Exhibition:

  • The exhibition, “A Conversation at the Edge of an Object”, curated by Daniel Campbell Blight, is a small exhibition that is being held at Somerset House in May 2015
  • Although when reading up on this particular exhibition I was actually unable to find any accompanying text written by Blight, I came across a small, explanatory piece that was written by the Royal Collage of Art (which is the institution where each of the cooperating practitioners attended) – http://photolondon.org/gallery/royal-college-art/
    • This piece of text suggested that the Photo London exhibition curated by Blight would showcase works that are diverse but “share an interest in questions of meaning, spectatorship and representation”, including the acknowledgement of “the heterogeneous traditions of fine art and visual culture”
  • Bearing this piece of information in mind, however, when I looked at the title of the exhibition (“A Conversation at the Edge of an Object”), it suggests that the pieces of work curated for this particular event looks into the idea of objects that either tells a story or holds different memories – this therefore provides the main reason as to why Anthony told me to look at this piece of work because it relates to my FMP in the sense that I am looking at a range of objects/places (including found photographs, collected materials, a different landscapes), that trigger the recollection of my memories, thus “telling a story”

 

The Work:

  • As I was unable to attend the exhibition (due to the date of the opening in relation to my FMP deadline), as briefly mentioned above, I decided to conduct some brief, online research into the practitioners that were due to take part in the exhibition
    • (Including: Sidsel Christensen, Philipp Dorl, Dominic Hawgood, Eugenia Ivanissevich, Mandukhai Kaylin, Agata Madejska, Joanna Piotrowska, Thomas Popé and Tereza Zelenkova)
  • When looking through some of their previous exhibition displays/installations, I was therefore able to identify the pieces of work that I thought would relate more to my FMP (due to their specific use of objects and installations), and have thus decided to focus my analysis and research on two particular individuals: Eugenia Ivanssevich and Tereza Zelenkova
  • (Please note, as suggested above, for this particular piece of research I have decided to focus on the presentation of ideas, rather than the aesthetics of the images)

 

Eugenia Ivanssevich:

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  • http://www.eugeniaivanissevich.com/work.html#
  • When looking through Eugenia Ivanssevich’s work (including “On the Island”, “Histoires de Plis”, and “Alpine Urge”), as you will see from the photographs included above, I soon noticed that her pieces were actually photographs of different, conceptual installations that incorporated both objects (to accompany the photographs included within the installation), as well as a carefully composed space in which the photographed installation was exhibited (in order to fit in with the concept of her work – discussed in more detail below)
  • Although there was no accompanying text included within these particular projects, I soon found that the title she had used for these collections, along with the object and the background depicted within the image, provided the viewer with enough information to gain a contextualized understanding surrounding the project
    • What I mean by this is that each aspect included within these final installation photographs (including the printed photographs, the objects, the positioning of the installation, and the title) provide the viewer with tiny clues surrounding the concept of her work, which can be combined to create an individual, contextualized understanding of the piece
    • For example, when I look at Ivanssevich work, taking into account a wide number of variables and features, I personally think that each of the pieces have been creates as a conceptual response discussing her relationships with different landscapes – this therefore applies to my FMP, because I am creating conceptual landscape images in order to represent the locations that I hold a close relationship with in terms of their ability to trigger some of my past memories
    • Although I feel that the photographs provide the viewer with more information in association with the concept (discussed in more detail below), the title of these pieces are actually used as a tool for a theoretic grounding with regards to the viewers reading and understanding of the project and its concept
  • Moving on to look at the photographs included within these projects, although I am not going to analyse the aesthetics of the images, due to photography’s ability to represent reality within a frame, it is this aspect of the staged installation that provides the viewer with the most information regarding the concept of the project
    • The objects and the backgrounds included within these installation photographs, have therefore been used as accompanying aspects to further enhance the viewers engagement, immersion, and contextualized understanding of the concept
  • Looking primarily at the objects included within these projects, although they have obviously been staged in these still-life installation images, these (as well as the photographs) have been presented in a carefully considered but relaxed way (rather than framing them side-by side in a “professional” exhibition space, for example)
    • This obviously decreases the formalized aspect of the project, which (along with the carefully considered juxtaposition between the photographs and the objects) can be used by the viewer to represent the artists emotional attachment to the conceptual landscape depicted
  • As suggested above, another factor Ivanssevich carefully considered within these staged photographs was the background
    • The background that she uses tends to be consistent throughout each of the different collections (suggesting a signature aesthetic of her work), and symbolizes that of an industrial artist studio
      • This can therefore be used by the viewer to suggest the artistic methodology behind the creation of the pieces
      • It also holds a conceptual reference to the passing of time within each of the landscapes depicted, through the documentation of varying pieces in front of the same background/location, thus enhancing the possibility of my conceptual reading of the project, suggested above
  •  Finally, as this work is conceptual in nature, as suggested in numerous pieces of previous research (including Peter Watkins’ “The Unforgetting”), the inclusion of all of these varying features, when combined, has allowed Ivanssevich to create different projects that explore a personal narrative and concept, whilst also creating a more universal and accessible project through the enhancement of the viewers contextualized understanding

 

Tereza Zelenkova:

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  • http://www.terezazelenkova.com/Tereza_Zelenkova/Home.html
  • When looking through Tereza Zelenkova’s work, as you will be able to see from the link included above, differing from the work of Eugenia Ivanssevich, Zelenkova’s website not only offered digital versions of the photographs that she created, but she also included installation photos which provided me with more, visual information, resulting in a slightly easier and more successful analysis regarding her presentation strategies
  • Focusing on Zelenkova works “London Brick”, “The Other Night”, and “Index of Time” (as I felt that these particular collections related more to my FMP due to their incorporation of accompanying aspects and presentation styles), similar to the work of to Ivanssevich, Zelenkova tends to use photographs and objects (as well as text) in order to create a conceptualized representation of the narrative she wishes to explore
  • As briefly suggested above, although Zelenkova did occasionally incorporate text within her projects (that enhanced the viewers contextualization of the work, as well as their accessibility – as suggested in previous research surrounding the inclusion of accompanying text), most of her collections didn’t include accompanying text
    • Similar to the work of Ivanssevich, however, I soon found that the title she had used for these collections (along with the exhibition pieces, including the photographs and the objects), provided the viewer with enough information to gain a contextualized understanding surrounding the project
    • Similar to what I suggested above under Ivanssevich’s work, although I feel that the photographs tend to provide the viewer with more information in association with the concept, the title of these pieces are actually used as a tool for a theoretic grounding with regards to the viewers reading and understanding of the project and its concept
  • In relation to the variety of objects that Zelenkova incorporated within her exhibition installations, although I was obviously unable to attend these particular documented exhibitions (due to the fact that they were some of her less recent works), I personally feel that the physical incorporation of some of her objects could have been used to enhance the engaging aspect of the project, whilst also further increasing the viewers contextualized understanding
  • When looking through this work, another aspect that I noticed in relation to the exhibition outcomes/installations, was the final presentation of the project which included the type of output (for example, in a book or a wall-mounted exhibition piece), and how the output was displayed (in terms of positioning and aesthetics, like frames)
    • Although I could spend a large amount of time analyzing and discussing the presentation of each of her projects, suggesting a variety of different opinions surrounding her reasoning’s for using these methods, the key, generalized point that I noticed was how each of these features were carefully considered (no matter how small they were), in order to symbolize the overarching theme and narrative of the collection, thus enhancing the contextualized understanding gained by the viewer
  • Also, a more specific aspect that I noticed when looking through Zelenkova’s work (especially in her collaborative project “Index of Time” that was created with Peter Watkins – who I have also researched into for my FMP), was her creation of a documentarian still-life photograph to encapsulate the authenticity of the object she was documenting – because, as stated in the Formative Feedback Review session (please see “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”) Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the creation of still-life images (as I wanted to experiment with the incorporation of my collected materials in order to see if they enhanced the viewers immersion and engagement with the project)
    • This particular, documentarian, still-life technique was therefore used within this collection in order to further enhance the concept behind the project through it’s representation referencing that of an “explorative” and “survey-like” methodology – which was used throughout the creation of this piece of work
  • Finally, similar to the work of Ivanssevich, as these collections are conceptual in nature, the inclusion of all of these varying features, when combined, has allowed Zelenkova to create different projects that often explore a personal narrative and concept, whilst also creating a more universal and accessible project through the enhancement of the viewers contextualized understanding

 

FMP Inspiration:

  • After looking at some of Eugenia Ivanssevich’s and Tereza Zelenkova’s previous work (who, as mentioned above, have been invited to cooperate in the “A Conversation at the Edge of an Object” exhibition curated by Daniel Campbell Blight), I have been able to gain a variety of inspiration relevant for the development of my FMP
  • The first piece of inspiration I gained from both Ivanssevich and Zelenkova’s work was my increased understanding surrounding the importance of accompanying pieces of text (including titles), within conceptual photographic projects, in order to provide the viewer with a contextualized understanding of the project they are witnessing
    • Although as suggested above, a majority of the time both of these practitioners tended not to use accompanying text (except with the inclusion of their title that provided the main grounding of the projects concept), I personally feel that the inclusion of accompanying text would have enhanced the successfulness of their projects
      • This is because, as briefly mentioned in other pieces of research, accompanying text tends to provide viewers with a greater contextual understanding and increased accessibility to the project
      • Please note, I have conducted more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects through the use of textual techniques, which can be found under “Text” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post
  •  Another piece of inspiration that I gained (mainly from Zelenkova’s work, due to her helpful inclusion of installation images throughout her website) was the careful consideration of display options (no matter how big or small), in order to further enhance the overarching theme, narrative, and concept of the project
    • This therefore applies to my FMP as I will carefully consider different presentation option in order to try and enhance the viewers understanding regarding the theme, narrative and concept of my personal project, thus enhancing their accessibility
  • Finally, however, the main piece of inspiration I am planning on taking away from this section of research are the aspects related to the inclusion of objects within a final exhibition piece
    • As suggested when I was looking into Zelenkova’s work, within her exhibition installations she included a variety of physical objects that I thought could have enhanced the immersive and engaging aspects of the project, whilst also further increasing the viewers contextualized understanding
      • This is because, as you may have seen throughout the development of my project (particularly within each of my proposals – please see the blog posts “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Original Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Revised Proposal”, “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”, and “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Final Proposal”), I am considering the inclusion of physical materials that I have collected on the trips, and experiment with this in order to see if they enhance the viewers immersion, engagement and contextualized understanding of my project, thus increasing their accessibility
    • During my research into Ivanssevich’s work, another piece of inspiration that I gained regarding the use of objects is the fact that her objects have been presented in a carefully considered but relaxed way (rather than framing the side-by side in a “professional” exhibition space, for example), decreasing the formalized aspect of the project, which can be used by the viewer to represent the artists emotional attachment to the conceptual landscape depicted
      • I could therefore relate this more specific inspiration to my FMP as I could perhaps experiment with the more relaxed positioning of some of my exhibition pieces (including archival aspects such as found photos, collected materials, and polaroid’s that I may include – also suggested within my proposals) in order to try and represent my personal emotions attached to the project
    • The last piece of inspiration that I gained regarding the use of objects relates to Zelenkova’s work (especially in her collaborative project “Index of Time” that was created with Peter Watkins), where she created documentarian still-life photographs to encapsulate the authenticity of the object, as well as referencing that of an “explorative” and “survey-like” methodology
      • This could therefore relate to my FMP because, as stated above, in the Formative Feedback Review session (please see “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”) Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the creation of still-life images as I wanted to experiment with the incorporation of my collected materials in order to see if they enhanced the viewers immersion and engagement with the project), and I feel that the documentarian aesthetics of Zelenkova’s still-life images, could be used to enhance the documentary aesthetic captured within my landscape photo, whilst also referencing the exploration and “survey-like” methodology of the project
        • However, as my project is very personal, this particular documentary, still-life technique could possibly increase the literal side of the project, taking away from the conceptual aspect, meaning that this will therefore need to be tested

 


 

Kate McMillan (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 15th April 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 15th April 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Kate McMillan

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look into McMillan’s work in relation to her incorporation of an “installation quality” (that includes natural, found materials) alongside her photographic pieces
  • I therefore decided to conduct some brief research into each of her collections and decided to focus my analysis on some of her projects that included the use of natural, collected materials as the installation feature
    • This is because I feel that these relate more to my FMP, (rather than installations that include more artificial materials that act as a screen for different projections, for example), due to the fact that I am thinking of incorporating natural, found materials from the numerous trips I have completed in the Lake District
  • Please note, similar to the research surrounding Eugenia Ivanissevich and Tereza Zelenkova seen above, I have also decided to focus this research on the installation pieces she has created (and the presentation of her ideas), rather than the aesthetics of the images
  • As you will see below, I have therefore included a brief, generalised reflection on some of her projects (that incorporate natural, collected materials within her installation), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

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  • http://www.katemcmillan.net
  • Please note, similar to the work of Tereza Zelenkova, McMillan’s website offered installation photos of each of the projects, which provided me with more visual information, resulting in a slightly easier and more successful analysis regarding her presentation strategies
  • When looking through Kate McMillan’s work, the main projects that incorporated natural materials within their exhibition installations were “Tidelands: The Sound of a Groundless Place”, “Undercurrent”, and “ Lapses in Judgement”
  • Looking into these particular projects, similar to both Eugenia Ivanssevich and Tereza Zelenkova, although McMillan didn’t include any accompanying text related to her different installations, I soon found that the title she had used for these collections, provided the viewer with enough information to ground the theoretical concept the viewers have gained from other features of her installation
  • However, focusing primarily on the inclusion of natural objects within her installations, once again similar to the work of both Ivanssevich and Zelenkova, the particular objects that McMillan used have been carefully chosen and positioned in order to provide the viewer with more visual information, creating a greater contextualized understanding from the audience
    • Within these particular installations, I also feel that the inclusion of different objects have been carefully considered (in terms of type and juxtaposition), in order to create a well balanced piece – this means that, instead of one particular feature overshadowing that of another, they work well together to create a more successful and understandable conceptual project
    • Also, in relation to the fact that the materials McMillan uses within these particular projects are natural, I personally feel that they not only enhance the viewers engagement with the project (as with most incorporated objects – discussed in previous research) but their natural form could be used to greatly enhance the immersive aspect of the project by providing a more realistic/authentic representation of the landscape depicted
    • Also, although this aspect may not greatly relate to my FMP, another observation I made when viewing these installations was the fact that some of the objects included within the collection actually contrasted from the photographic pieces
      • This choice was obviously carefully considered in order to enhance an underlying concept surrounding the work, but it also creates a more engaging and thought-provoking piece, enticing the interest of the viewer
  •  When looking through these particular collections, similar to the work of Zelenkova, another aspect that I noticed in relation to exhibition installations, was the final presentation of the project which included the type of output (for example, in a photographs, materials, etc.), and how the output was displayed (in terms of positioning and aesthetics, like frames)
    • Although I could spend a large amount of time analyzing and discussing the presentation of each of her projects, suggesting a variety of different opinions surrounding her reasoning’s for using these methods, the key, generalized point that I noticed was how each of these features were carefully considered (no matter how small they were), in order to symbolize the overarching theme and narrative of the collection, thus enhancing the contextualized understanding gained by the viewer
  • Finally, similar to the work of both Ivanssevich and Zelenkova, as these collections are conceptual in nature, the inclusion of all of these varying features, when combined, has allowed McMillan to create different projects that often explore a personal narrative and concept, whilst also creating a more universal and accessible project through the enhancement of the viewers contextualized understanding

 

FMP Inspiration

  • As you can see through the analysis that I have included above, when looking through Kate McMillan’s work, I soon found that a number of aspects (associated with the incorporation of objects within an installation) were very similar to the work of Eugenia Ivanssevich and Tereza Zelenkova, meaning that I have gained similar pieces of inspiration that is relevant for the development of my FMP
  • The first piece of inspiration I gained from McMillan’s work was my increased understanding surrounding the importance of accompanying pieces of text (including titles), within conceptual photographic projects, in order to provide the viewer with a contextualized understanding of the project they are witnessing
    • As suggested above, McMillan tended not to use accompanying text in association with her installations, and I personally feel that the inclusion of accompanying text would have enhanced the successfulness of her projects – this is because, as briefly mentioned in other pieces of research, accompanying text tends to provide viewers with a greater contextual understanding and increased accessibility to the project
    • Please note, I will be conducting more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects through the use of textual techniques, which can be found under “Text” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post)
  • Another piece of inspiration that I gained was the careful consideration of display options, in order to further enhance the overarching theme, narrative, and concept of the project
    • This therefore applies to my FMP as I will carefully consider different presentation option in order to try and enhance the viewers understanding regarding the theme, narrative and concept of my project, thus enhancing their accessibility
  • Finally, however, the main piece of inspiration I am planning on taking away from this section of research are the aspects related to the inclusion of objects within a final exhibition piece
    • As suggested above, within these particular exhibition installations, McMillan tended to incorporate natural materials and objects in order to further enhance the engaging aspect of the project, as well as further increasing the viewers contextualized understanding – however, due to the fact that these particular materials were in fact natural, I personally feel that this greatly enhances the immersive aspect of the project by providing a more realistic/authentic representation of the landscape depicted
      • I could therefore relate this piece of inspiration to my FMP because, as stated in the Formative Feedback Review session (please see “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”) Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the creation of still-life images as I wanted to experiment with the incorporation of my collected materials in order to see if they enhanced the viewers immersion, engagement, and contextualized understanding of my project, thus increasing their accessibility

 


 

Darren Harvey-Regan (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 15th April 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 15th April 2015), he suggested that I look into the work of Darren Harvey-Regan

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look into Harvey-Regan’s work in relation to his incorporation of objects within his photographic works
  • After conducting some brief research into his work, I soon found that all four of the projects/”chapters” that were included on his website could be used as relevant research to look into for this particular aspect
  • This therefore means that, similar to the research surrounding Eugenia Ivanissevich, Tereza Zelenkova, and Kate McMillan seen above, I have decided to focus this research on the incorporation of these varying features, rather than the aesthetics of the images he has created
  • As you will see below, I have therefore analyzed each of these projects (in relation to the incorporation of objects), followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

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  • http://www.harveyregan.com/fig%20home.html
  • Please note, similar to the work of Tereza Zelenkova and Kate McMillan, Harvey-Regan’s website offered installation photos of each of the projects, which provided me with more visual information, resulting in a slightly easier and more successful analysis regarding his presentation strategies
  • When looking through all four of his online projects/”chapters” similar to the previous three pieces of research (Eugenia Ivanissevich, Tereza Zelenkova, and Kate McMillan), although Harvey-Regan didn’t include any accompanying text related to his different projects, I soon found that he incorporated simplistic titles that could be used to provide the viewer with a slight clue regarding the concept behind the project
    • However, differing from the previous three pieces of work, Harvey-Regan included brief, simplistic sub-titles that used singular words to describe what was included within the collection, which, through the textual style and presentation used, also referenced the documentarian aesthetics and concepts he explores within the project, thus providing the viewer with a contextual clue as to what to expect from the project
  • Differing from the previous three individuals that I researched into (Ivanissevich, Zelenkova, and McMillan), whilst also providing a brief similarity to Zelenkova’s collaboration with Peter Watkins (discussed above), Harvey-Regan incorporates objects within his projects through the use of still-life photography
    • As you will see from the photographs included above, Harvey-Regan varies the aesthetic style of his still-life images
      • One of the reasons for doing this is to enhance the authenticity and documentarian representation of the object depicted, including experimenting with the positioning of the studio light in order to create deeper shadows to enhance the 3D aspect of the object, as well as increasing the photographic representation of the objects texture (which is also enhanced through the use of black and white colouration – as suggested in previous research regarding the landscape photographer Fay Godwin)
      • Harvey-Regan also experiments with the composition (and sometimes the colour) of his still-life images, in order to create a more conceptual and abstract image, enhancing the viewers engagement with the piece through its thought-provoking capability
  •  Bearing all of this in mind, Harvey-Regan carefully considers and experiments with the final exhibition displays in order to further enhance the textural aspect of the objects depicted (for example, the curvature of the print to enhance the 3D aspect of the object, or the use of an accompanying light, carefully placed to mirror the direction of the light that was used during the creation of the image)
    • Now, as there is no accompanying text, meaning that I am unable to grasp the full concept behind these particular projects, this means that I am also unsure as to the reasoning’s behind these particular, unique, display options
      • However, in relation to the textural aspects of the object (as suggested above), these particular display techniques enhance the documentarian and authentic aspect I previously suggested (when discussing the titles/sub-titles), which, similar to the physical natural materials that McMillan used within her installations, can be used to increase the viewers visual immersion with the project by providing a more realistic/authentic representation of the object depicted

 

FMP Inspiration

  • After looking through a range of Darren Harvey-Regan’s work I have been able to gain a variety of inspiration relevant for the development of my FMP
  • Similar to the previous three pieces of research that I conducted (Eugenia Ivanissevich, Tereza Zelenkova, and Kate McMillan) the first piece of inspiration I gained from Harvey-Regan’s work was my increased understanding surrounding the importance of accompanying pieces of text (including titles), within conceptual photographic projects, in order to provide the viewer with a contextualized understanding of the project they are witnessing
    • As suggested above, Harvey-Regan tended not to use accompanying text in association with his pieces, and I personally feel that the inclusion of accompanying text would have enhanced the successfulness of his projects – this is because, as briefly mentioned in other pieces of research, accompanying text tends to provide viewers with a greater contextual understanding and increased accessibility to the project
    • Please note, I will be conducting more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects through the use of textual techniques, which can be found under “Text” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post)
  • Another piece of inspiration that I gained, was actually in relation to his use of still-life images to depict physical objects
    • As briefly suggested above (similar to the research I conducted surrounding Zelenkova’s collaboration with Peter Watkins), Harvey-Regan created documentary still-life images hat incorporated the use of varying photographic techniques in order to enhance the authenticity of the object, thus increasing the viewers visual immersion with the project by providing a more realistic/authentic representation of the object depicted
      • This could therefore relate to my FMP, because as suggested above, in the Formative Feedback Review session (please see “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”) Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the creation of still-life images (as I wanted to experiment with the incorporation of my collected materials in order to see if they enhanced the viewers immersion and engagement with the project), and I feel that the documentarian aesthetics of Harvey-Regan’s still-life images, could be used to enhance the documentary aesthetic captured within my landscape photo
        • However, as my project is very personal, this particular documentary, still-life technique could possibly increase the literal side of the project, taking away from the conceptual aspect, meaning that this will therefore need to be tested
  • The final piece of inspiration that I will be taking away from Darren Harvey-Regan’s work is the careful consideration of display options, which, in this case, enhanced the aesthetic aspect of the displayed pieces (through the curvature of the print and the incorporation of an accompanying light)
    • Although I most likely won’t be sing this particular piece of inspiration to increase the physical techniques shown within the displayed pieces, similar to the three pieces of previous research, I will instead carefully consider different presentation options in order to try and enhance the viewers understanding regarding the theme, narrative and concept of my project, thus enhancing their accessibility

 


 

One and Three Chairs” by Joseph Kosuth (suggested in the one-to-one tutorial with Anthony Luvera on the 15th April 2015)

In a one-to-one tutorial that I had with Anthony Luvera (on the 15th April 2015), he suggested that I look into Joseph Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs” project

  • After the discussion that we had in the one-to-one tutorial, I knew that Anthony Luvera mainly wanted me to look into Kosuth’s work in relation to his incorporation of images, text and objects
  • This therefore means that, similar to the research surrounding Eugenia Ivanissevich, Tereza Zelenkova, Kate McMillan and Darren Harvey-Regan seen above, I have decided to focus this research on the incorporation of these varying features, rather than the aesthetics of the images he has created
  • As you will see below, I have therefore spent time analyzing his project in relation to the incorporation of the three aspects, followed by the inspiration that I gained for my FMP:

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  • http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/joseph-kosuth-one-and-three-chairs-1965
  • As you will see from the photographs included above, Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs” project was a collection of installations that represented that of a triptych through it’s incorporation of three different aspects: a still-life photograph of the object, the physical object itself, and an accompanying piece of text that presented the definition of the chosen object
  • Although when viewing each of these included aspects individually, they may appear simple and irrelevant, as you will see from the analysis I included below, when looking at them in a combined installation, they hold a very powerful concept
  • Starting with focusing on the still-life images that Kosuth created, offering a similarity to the work of Darren Harvey-Regan, Kosuth carefully considered the aesthetics of the images in order to enhance the authenticity and documentarian representation of the object depicted
    • Some of the photographic techniques that Kosuth employed for the documentation of these objects (once again very similar to the work of Harvey-Regan), included his positioning of the studio light in order to create shadows to enhance the 3D aspect of the object, as well as increasing the photographic representation of the objects texture (which is also enhanced through the use of black and white colouring – as suggested in previous research regarding the landscape photographer Fay Godwin)
  • Moving on to the object that Kosuth included, he carefully considered the positioning and lighting of the object in the exhibition space in order to precisely mirror the aesthetics of the object captured within the photograph, further enhancing the photographs authenticity (as briefly discussed above)
  • In relation to the accompanying text that has been included within the triptych, as briefly mentioned above, Kosuth decided to further enhance the authentic contextualization of the installation piece through the inclusion of an academic definition of the object shown
  • All three of these aspects therefore provide the viewer with varying types of information (including visual, physical, and academic) which, when viewed together can be used to suggest the overarching concept this project is exploring (the use of the photographic medium and the conceptual ability of the camera in terms of the authenticity), thus enhancing the viewers contextualized understanding of the project

 

FMP Inspiration

  • After looking at Joseph Kosuth’s “One and Three Chairs”, I have been able to gain a variety of inspiration relevant for the development of my FMP
  • Similar to the four previous pieces of research (Eugenia Ivanissevich, Tereza Zelenkova, Kate McMillan and Daren Harvey-Regan) the first piece of inspiration I gained from Kosuth’s work was my increased understanding surrounding the importance of accompanying pieces of text in order to provide the viewer with a contextualized understanding of the project they are witnessing
    • Please note, I will be conducting more in-depth research surrounding this idea of enhancing the contextualization of different projects through the use of textual techniques, which can be found under “Text” in the “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Technical Research” blog post)
  • Also similar to the previous research, the next piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from Kosuth’s work is his use of carefully considered aspects (both in terms of the aesthetics of the images and the display of the collection) in order to enhance the viewers understanding regarding the theme, narrative and concept of my project, thus enhancing their accessibility
  • The next piece of inspiration that I may apply to my FMP, is the use of a triptych that incorporates the combination of a photo, object, and text
    • This is because, as suggested in my second revised proposal (please see “352MC professional Photographic Practice – Second Revised Proposal”) I am considering this presentation method to create a more immersive and engaging piece through the incorporation of varying aspects, in order to enhance the viewers contextualized understanding surrounding the project
  • Finally, however, the main piece of inspiration that I am going to be taking away from Kosuth’s work (similar to the inspiration gained from both Zelenkova’s and Harvey-Regan’s work) was the considered aesthetics of the still-life images, in order to enhance the documentarian and authentic feel of the objects depicted, thus increasing the viewers visual immersion with the project by providing a more realistic/authentic representation of the object depicted
    • This is because, as stated in the Formative Feedback Review session (please see “352MC Professional Photographic Practice – Lecture 7 (Formative Feedback Review)”) Anthony Luvera suggested that I should experiment with the creation of still-life images (as I wanted to experiment with the incorporation of my collected materials in order to see if they enhanced the viewers immersion and engagement with the project), and I feel that the documentarian aesthetics of Kosuth’s still-life images, could be used to enhance the documentary aesthetic captured within my landscape photo, whilst also referencing the exploration and “survey-like” methodology of the project
    • However, as my project is very personal, this particular documentary, still-life technique could possibly increase the literal side of the project, taking away from the conceptual aspect, meaning that this will therefore need to be tested
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